Veydra 1.2 PL to PL Adapter Gives Old Lenses New Life

Veydra 1.2 Adapter
Veydra 1.2 PL to PL adapterCredit: Courtesy of Veydra
Veydra's new expander adapts older Super35mm lens designs to larger sensors like the Red Epic Dragon, and is available for a deep discount during introductory month.

Digital sensors are getting larger and larger, and some of the incremental changes are making it so even recently designed lenses aren't compatible with modern cameras. Veydra is aiming to overcome that situation with a 1.2x PL-Mount to PL-Mount Expander that lets lenses designed for the Super35mm format work with with the larger sensors we're seeing more of in the digital realm. For instance, even the Angenieux Optimo 24-290, which came out less than 20 years ago and is still a mainstay of production, doesn't cover the Dragon sensor fully.

Optimo
Optimo 24-290 12x zoom.Credit: Courtesy of Angeniuex

This is a bigger deal with zoom lenses than primes: a zoom lens has a much more complicated design to facilitate changing the field of view. Mount a 24-290 on the Dragon and you'll see a hard cut at the edge of the image. You’ll also run into issues with some very wide angle primes, since the wider the field of view in front of the lens, the narrower the imager circle behind. However, that tends to show up more as heavy vignetting and less as a hard crop.  This has always meant discussions with rental houses about what format you were shooting, and a more limited pool of lens options available the bigger your sensor.

If the lens you want to shoot hasn't covered your full imager, the best solution in the past has been a tele converter, which will increase the image circle, but tele converters change the field of view more dramatically (1.4-2x) and usually eat a lot more light (a stop or more). The Veydra eats 1/2 a stop, only changes the field of view slightly, and is something that rental houses that purchase to help bring older lenses into the playing field for modern camera’s. It’ll give cinematographers and filmmakers more choices at the rental house, and perhaps (though maybe I’m being optimistic), lower prices on cine-zooms rental slightly by increasing the pool of lenses available.

Duclos lenses has tested a variety of Super35mm zooms and found a lot of great options for covering a sensor up to 34mm diagonally, but personally I’m most excited by the Cooke 25-250, a nice long cine zoom with a great personality that generally rents at a significant discount over the 24-290.  

The 1.2x will ship with an introductory price of $2150, which will go up to a regular price of $3495 once the introductory period is over at the end of this month.

Are there any older lenses you can’t wait to mount up on a bigger sensor?     

Your Comment

10 Comments

Hmm, on a Red you'd just shoot at a resolution that doesn't vignette with those lenses. This mount might be applicable for current model Alexas and other less than 4K cinema cameras.
The 1/2 stop loss is an irritation though.
With Arri's upcoming 6K Alexa I would say this is irrelevant.

August 2, 2016 at 8:50AM

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Richard L
Camera assistant, DIT, DOP
242

Well, the Alexa is S35 so there would be boil need for something like this. 6k Alexa? You know something the rest of the world doesn't?

August 2, 2016 at 10:14AM

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Oscar Stegland
DP/Steadicam
1247

Heavily invested industry folk are talking bout Alexa 6k as a certainty. Even it it doesn't end up being 6k exactly there'll most likely be a higher res sensor in the next 2-4 years. Especially as some broadcasters are starting to insist the master format is 4k or better. Netflix in particular are pushing this.

August 2, 2016 at 11:47AM

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Richard L
Camera assistant, DIT, DOP
242

I don't really see much need for development beyond 4K delivery. Practical returns on resolution increases are diminishing rapidly. 35mm film doesn't generally resolve better than 4K once it's printed, and people weren't clamoring for feature films in IMAX.

August 2, 2016 at 12:02PM

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And lose 8K?! The horror!
*rolls eyes*

August 2, 2016 at 11:42AM

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someone has to be hell bent for no reason to want to shoot on the RED 6k or 8k frame area to use this for their $30,000-$80,000 lenses. Most guys try to limit the amount of filters on top of the lens. And putting glass between the lens and sensor is also an issue that most professionals will not want to do. Look at the RED motion mount, you get gross flares, odd light bouncing, lost of clarity, a weird shift of colors, and increase in shadow noise. It would just be smarter to shoot at 5k. I feel like this site is pushing RED for some reason. Like there's always great articles posted, but there's an increase in promoting RED

August 2, 2016 at 4:32PM

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Promoting red? Not NFS fault red is making so much noise..
The beauty of the 6k Dragons is shooting in 6k. Cropping the sensor down to 4K, or even 5k just doesn't look right to me. Having used a 24-290 angenieux with a dragon I can honestly say this adapter is welcome. (Even tho I kinda like the vignette at wider focal ranges)
Also I think it's fair to mention the new s35 8k sensor should not need this adapter.
Looks very cool

August 3, 2016 at 3:08AM, Edited August 3, 3:08AM

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yeah, not sure about that. NFS has to make money some way (I don't blame them, just wish it wasn't so constant) and RED knows nofilmschool is a good place to promote their stuff, since you got folks trying to learn about industry stuff. Also not sure why shooting in the 5k area on the 6k sensor doesn't look right to you. Social Network and the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo shot at that or 4.5k and they are still probably the best stuff shot with REDs. 5k is more than enough. I can guarantee you that no one is going to want to put this between an s4 or master prime. I've also shot with the angenieux, the fujinons, the arri zooms.... you name it; putting this between the glass and sensor is definitely not a good alternative when you can just crop to the appropriate framing

August 3, 2016 at 10:42AM

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would rather shoot 6k and create guides for a 4k slice. Here is a very helpful video for those who are not familiar with red work flow

https://vimeo.com/78581143

August 4, 2016 at 7:25AM, Edited August 4, 8:05AM

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Are there any other sensors aside from the Dragon sensor in RED cameras that exist is a strange realm somewhere between S35 and the full 35mm film frame?

The Blackmagic Ursa's sensor is slightly bigger but I haven't heard of any S35 glass coming up short.

This adapter-- even if it's optically excellent-- would soften the image slightly, thus negating the extra "sharpness" you'd theoretically get from down sampling 6K to 4K (instead of just shooting in the cropped area of the RED sensor).

Since 4K on the Dragon sensor is often called "soft," meaning that to get HQ 4K you need 6K, I wonder what RED's logic was behind defying standard film frame conventions? Or is that exactly the point?

August 4, 2016 at 5:36PM, Edited August 4, 5:42PM

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