October 22, 2014 at 12:34AM

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How I went from a Canon Rebel T1i to directing a $1M project

Hey NoFilmSchoolers! I’ve been coming here for years now and was stoked to see the site turn into more of an open community.
I have been looking through the discussion boards from time to time and noticed several threads popping up about, “Advice for newbies!” or “Things you would tell someone just getting started.” So I thought I’d share my own experience. This is how I got started with just a Canon Rebel T1i all the way to how I landed my top job of choice directing video for a multi-million dollar project. But even if you’re already a pretty well established video/filmmaker be sure to skip down to #4 for something I’m deciding to give away for everyone, I think you’ll find it really helpful.
So I’m no Christopher Nolan by any stretch of the imagination, but I have had some pretty great experiences that hopefully you will find helpful.
1.) Getting Started
You want to get started, but don’t know how to get in? You’ve probably heard this one before because this is the one I heard all the time too. Get a camera and then make stuff. When I got started all I could afford was a Canon Rebel t1i with an 18-35mm kit lens. I think it cost about $500 and had no manual exposure controls. It couldn’t even shoot usable frame rates at 1080 resolution. But it didn’t matter, I owned it and was able to use it to learn and experiment. One of the films I’m most proud of (and now most embarrassed of) was a film I shot on my Rebel t1i. Check it out! (But don’t judge me too hard! That was over 5 years ago!) Either way, I do think it goes to show that even with an entry level camera you can make some good stuff happen. Don’t be too embarrassed to start. The kind of gear that is available now is a million times better than what was around just 5 years ago.
http://youtu.be/NmA4XPx9Q9M

2.) Push yourself
It wasn’t too long after finishing “Who is Jacob Stills” that I discovered Poptent.net. These crowdsourcing video sites are pretty popular now, and there are a lot of them. (Tongal, Zoopa, MoFilm etc) The idea is that the sites set up sponsored video contests by big name brands. Anyone can enter and read the assignment’s creative brief, and then produce a commercial to compete against other creators for a grand prize. I kind of have a love-hate relationship with spec work like this because it always ends up in somebody who made a good video not making any money. But when I was first getting started this was an AWESOME opportunity. Just think of it as insanely good practice. You can accept any assignment for free and see the REAL creative brief for that brand’s assignment. The fact that you can get that kind of insight into the agency world for FREE is just crazy to me. This gave me free opportunities to practice being a commercial director. My first commercial I shot on my Rebel was competing for a $10K prize! I was so close to winning, but in the end I got 2nd place and was beat out by a guy with a RED ONE out there somewhere :(
Here’s the commercial:
http://youtu.be/rZIEI1Endx0
It was a little frustrating to make what I thought was a good video, get so close, but then in the end lose and receive nothing. But again, even though I didn’t win any money, I knew I would gain some really good experience which I could then use to try to improve my next project.
I kept competing and on my third or fourth try I won a contest for Dish Network. I shot it in a day on my Rebel t1i and it made me $5,000!
Here’s the commercial: (Don’t judge!)
http://youtu.be/GBMkmZOYZ6c
Pretty embarrassing right? I bet you could make something MUCH better, but you can’t argue with $5K! After putting yourself to work for a little while you’ll start to see the fruits of your efforts. It will only get better, especially if you can understand and apply this next principle.
3.) Iteration and Evolution
Iteration and evolution is a principle that shows up in the success of all things everywhere. EVERYWHERE. Think about how the theory of evolution applies in the animal kingdom. Somewhere out there millions of years ago a rodent critter emerged from a hole somewhere and decided it was a good idea to eat some ants. It spent its life eating ants and competing against other critters who ate ants as well. The offspring from that rodent that had features that allowed them to eat ants just a ‘little’ better than other critters went on to pass those traits to their offspring. On and on through multiple ‘iterations’ and over the course of millions of years each of those iterations eventually lead to the evolution of what we now know today as an anteater. Just take a second and look at this picture of an anteater.
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-pC3q-7Lhc8s/UfjmQTaCsNI/AAAAAAAAJmc/F26bUOjK-q...
These guys are just ridiculously good at eating ants. Everything from the length of their tongue, to their ant-mound crushing claws. Even their saliva has developed to have a sticky consistency making it easier to snatch up all the little ant people from outta their beds. You pit any other critter out there in a competition to eat ants these days, and an anteater will absolutely pummel it. It’s gotten so good at eating ants in fact that its effin name is ANTEATER! That’s a pretty powerful evolution.
Effective iterations are what power evolution. You want to evolve from where you are now, to a state where you pummel your competition and get what you want! The faster you can effectively iterate, the quicker you will evolve into something that will just DOMINATE. Here is how you effectively iterate.
Act - Observe - Iterate - Repeat
ACT – This means make stuff. Find projects to work on and then do work son. Watching YouTube tutorials is good, but making something after you watch those videos is 1000x better. Complete a project doing the best you know how, and then get it delivered.
OBSERVE – After the dust has settled on your project and you’ve seen its results. Take a close look at it. Be objective about it. What did you do poorly? What went well? Looking at it now how could you have done it better?
ITERATE – Decide specifically what you WILL do better next time. Do you need to learn a new technique in After Effects? Go learn it. Did someone beat you because they understood advertising theory better then you? Go learn it! Did you get too crammed in the final hours of your project? Learn some project management yo! By making small but significant advances in your abilities you complete the iteration cycle and are ready for the next run.
REPEAT – Find another project, and go at it again! After all, you are constantly becoming more qualified to absolutely crush it!
After I had one success in Poptent, I hit the iteration cycles super hard. I would constantly be looking for projects to work on. Anytime a project showed up on my radar I would take it on, submit my best work, learn from it, and repeat. This led to several more successes. In 4 days I made 45 seconds of video that won me $15,000. That was awesome. Two months before I was wanting to buy a car, but instead I found a video contest by Dairy Queen where they were giving away 6 Mini Cooper Countrymans. I analyzed the brief, created a strategy, developed a 30 second video that I shot in 3 days and won myself a car!
http://static.squarespace.com/static/50ac4a5be4b079767f996281/t/5112c82d...
The better you can get at quickly and effectively iterating, the faster you will overcome your competition and become a dominant force in your industry of choice. If this iterations stuff sounds interesting you should check out ‘The Lean Start-up’ By Eric Reis.
Here’s another important point to remember about iteration and evolution. As you develop through your evolution phases, take particular care to look for opportunities to ‘jump markets.’ If you’re a small fish out in the ocean and you want to eat big tuna, you get there by starting with eating shrimp, and then incrementally increasing the size of fish you can swallow whole until you are eating BIG fish like tuna. If you’ve ever played Hungry Shark on your phone then you definitely know what I’m talking about.
When I had video successes I would take money I earned from contests and clients and reinvest it somehow into increasing my abilities. I would upgrade my gear or buy something that allowed me to serve other clients I didn’t have access to before. I bought a wide angle lens so I could serve local real estate companies making housing videos. My car had cool drop down seats which let me toss all my gear in and easily serve clients further away. I bought the Adobe Creative Suite and learned After Effects which let me experiment with motion graphics, this in particular landed me a gig with a software company in California doing motion graphic work remotely etc. By reinvesting in my abilities I was able to ‘jump into markets’ that I previously didn’t have access to. This gave me the ability to land bigger gigs and make more money which gave me access to better opportunities.
From there it was just a continuation of the iteration process. While I was at school I had the opportunity to re-boot the student advertising agency. This gave me experience running a start-up and managing multiple accounts as a Creative Director. Tons of iterations in there! By the time I was graduating I had three job offers. One from an Agency in Salt Lake City as a Creative Director, one from Lockheed Martin doing corporate training videos (yuck) and one really unique offer to run the video team for a start-up-within-a-company from a Software Company in Seattle called Construx. The Construx offer was definitely the best offer and my top choice. The work I’m doing is a little corporate-video-esque, but the biggest reason I took the job is because of the experience its giving me access too. I work directly with the CEO and see firsthand what kinds of logic, decisions and management principles go into a launching a multi-million dollar project. This is the biggest iteration opportunity I’ve had so far, and I’m excited to complete my best work and launch it out to millions of people! Yikes!
So I may not be exactly where you want to be, but I think the principles of iteration and evolution apply to anyone regardless of where you want to be. Once you identify where exactly that is, take the time to identify the milestones you’d need to hit along the way, and then work in iteration cycles until you get there!
4.) The Video Production Industry needs to Iterate
The video production industry is going through some really interesting phases right now. The democratization of film has made video production more accessible than ever before, and this is both an opportunity and a danger for everyone involved. One trend in particular that I’ve been observing, is that the roles between the people who are making the videos, and the people who are running the strategy behind the videos are being combined into the same person. In the past, being a successful filmmaker or videographer meant being able to technically execute a video. You knew how to operate a camera, frame and light a scene, run good audio etc. But today it’s becoming increasingly more important to also know the WHY behind the video, especially the kinds of videos that we have clients paying us to make. These days a videographer also needs to understand marketing and business principles, you need to know how to identify and target a market. How to get inside their heads and communicate to them. How to produce a video that you know will actually get results. In short it’s not only important to know how to make the video right (proper techniques, equipment, cinematography etc) but even more important to learn how to make the RIGHT video. The video that will get results!
So with these thoughts in mind, for the last year I’ve been developing a course that effectively teaches those principles. It’s called the “Make The Right Video Process.” Up until now I was selling it at full price ($500) and have had some great success among agencies and production houses around the world. (Over 1,000 students!) But now that I’ve funded my next project with it I’m deciding to essentially give it away to the people who are trying to teach themselves. (Ok, so I’m still charging $2 to help keep the lights on over there. But what’s $2 these days for something that used to cost $500 bones amirite?)
All the principles are distilled down to a very simple and effective way to be learned, making this course a quick study, but an extremely powerful one.
Here’s the explainer video that I would run when I was more serious about trying to make sales.
http://youtu.be/ejmr4h6SSb8
And one of the most recent comments from one of my students:
“You weren't kidding in your introduction and statement that you have condensed whats needed to Make The RIGHT Video. Any student of this course that really applies and masters what you teach here will certainly go onto incredible success. You have condensed the most important processes that many experts WISH they could teach into simple to understand steps that are actionable, repeatable and scale-able. Nice work Logan. You've certainly demonstrated what happens when you make every word count.”
Is this sounding spammy? What I’m trying to say is it’s a great resource! One that I used to charge a lot of money for but for you guys it’s practically free! If you’re serious about making videos professionally please take advantage of that discount and learn yerself some education!
https://www.udemy.com/maketherightvideo/?couponCode=NFSinsider
Was any of this helpful? I’d love to keep this conversation going and talk more about the implications of the democratization of film and how anyone can get started in the industry. What do you think is next for the video production industry? What other principles did you find vital in your process?

42 Comments

Thanks for the tips man, really aprecciate it. Would've loved if you didn't advertise your "course" at the end. I don't know, for a second I thought someone was being honest and real, and then when I saw that, I got confused. But oh well, I'll keep the rest of the comment to myself.

October 23, 2014 at 12:02AM

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Tommy Plesky
Director / D.P / Editor
1964

Sorry it came across as an advertisement man, Id really like to hear the rest of your comment though. The truth is it was sincere. I was able to sell the course for a while and make what I was hoping to start my next project. And now I just wanted to release it to people who are learning in as accessible of a way as possible (while still maintaining the respect of the information.) In my experience people just don't seem to respect or value information that is free. I guess what I was thinking was, "Heck, $2 is still practically free right? I lose that much money when I sneeze the wrong way. But this way people will still respect the time it took to develop the information and take the commitment to digest and apply it." More than anything else I just want to see more people learn these principles, and seriously apply them in their work. What do you think? Sorry again that it seemed spammy, I guess I just think it'd be funny for someone to go through all that work just to sell a course for 2 bucks.

October 23, 2014 at 1:53AM, Edited October 23, 1:53AM

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Logan Bean
Video Director / Colorist / Entrepreneur
588

Don't worry about it, nothing that bad, it's just that nowadays it is hard to trust that people do something for the "good of society" you know? 2 dollar is not much for a detailed course, so thanks again for your helping NoFilmSchool community.

October 25, 2014 at 2:27AM

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Tommy Plesky
Director / D.P / Editor
1964

Well said Tommy - it doth give that appearance. Love the article Logan - very inspirational.

October 26, 2014 at 3:33AM

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Great article, was I the only one who was amazed by the news of the likes of Poptent. Think its a great opportunity for people, very tempted to find some time to submit.

October 23, 2014 at 1:26AM, Edited October 23, 1:26AM

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Dale Leszczynski
Shooter Editor VFX
290

Yea they really are a great opportunity! After you submit a couple to the public assignments they will actually start inviting you to private assignments which are even better. (They'll pay you a little up front to submit, and there are less entries in those assignments) In fact a few months ago they actually contacted me exclusively to make a commercial for the Whisper App, so that kind of stuff can happen too which is pretty cool :)

October 23, 2014 at 1:58AM

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Logan Bean
Video Director / Colorist / Entrepreneur
588

Great article, yes indeed. ;D

October 23, 2014 at 2:38AM, Edited October 23, 2:38AM

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Ragüel Cremades
Film producer and director
7588

congrats! not same but similar road here too. i started this website from a t2i to a carbon dragon ;)

October 23, 2014 at 3:57PM

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Kazu Okuda
Filmmaker
1186

Nice man! I am still yet to even touch a RED yet, so I'm super jealous :P

October 23, 2014 at 9:53PM

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Logan Bean
Video Director / Colorist / Entrepreneur
588

Dear Logal,

Please kindly share with us the actual links to your Poptent work.

October 23, 2014 at 8:29PM, Edited October 23, 8:29PM

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Alex Zakrividoroga
Director
3841

Sure man, you can check out my Poptent profile here https://www.poptent.com/user/bea06009 and then all of the public submissions that I've made clicking on the media tab in the top left.
Here for example is the Sniagrab commercial I mentioned in the post: https://www.poptent.com/media/19342
Cheers!

October 23, 2014 at 9:37PM

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Logan Bean
Video Director / Colorist / Entrepreneur
588

I sure hope that you don't get money from Poptent to post this. Your post does sound similar to a paid advertisement.

And I won't go into how exploitative businesses like Poptent are. That's a discussion for another day.

October 24, 2014 at 8:13AM

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Elias Ressegatti
Director
263

haha wow ... I didn't realize how strong the distrust would be. No Poptent is NOT paying me to say any of this. I got started with Poptent because they were one of the first companies out there to start doing that kind of thing, but personally I'm not a huge fan of their model. Most of the time there is too much risk, you could spend a significant amount of time with lots of people producing a great commercial, and in the end still have no idea whether you're going to get paid for it ... that sucks. Tongal seems to have a better model going on with a lot more payouts along the way as well as ways to reduce risk for the creators. (And no ... Tongal is NOT paying me to say that either)
All I was trying to say is that as someone getting started needing an opportunity to sharpen their skills any of those places could be a good place to start, they worked great for me, gave me opportunities to practice and sometimes even paid off in a big way.

October 24, 2014 at 11:58AM

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Logan Bean
Video Director / Colorist / Entrepreneur
588

Glad to hear.
Yes, it is exploitative exactly for those reasons you mentioned. And, the pay-off is just not close to enough in case you do win to actually make this worth it. Unless you've done all the work by yourself (but you'll still have to pay everyone involved: crew, actors, etc.).
Glad to hear it's working for some. Go get it!

October 24, 2014 at 3:58PM

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Elias Ressegatti
Director
263

You're exactly right man. I don't do too much with Poptent these days. If a private assignment comes along with multiple payouts sometimes I'll look it over with my team and decide to take it on, but beyond that theres just too much risk involved to try and realistically run a business competing for spec-work projects. Good luck to you!

October 24, 2014 at 6:15PM

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Logan Bean
Video Director / Colorist / Entrepreneur
588

I didn't take your article as an advertisement. Far from it. Know there are people out here who thrive on your great info and many successes.

December 14, 2014 at 2:19AM

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After reading through the negative comments on here I wanted to give my opinion. People thought this post was Spammy? They need a little Gary Vaynerchuck in their lives. You provided value up front in that you told your personal story & gave 4 pieces of advice. Only then did you mention the course that you had created. I say well done.

Now if you had lead with your course & followed with the rest of your post, that would be a different story. I think that haters hate because they are not where they want to be and don't want to take responsibility for that. It is easier to just try & bring someone else down to their level.

Thanks for providing value and not forgetting where you came from!

March 23, 2016 at 9:38AM

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Derek Armitage
Filmmaker & Vlogger
535

What's your favorite part of making film? Considering you sound like many of us here, wearing all the hats. What part do you enjoy the most?

October 24, 2014 at 11:33AM, Edited October 24, 11:33AM

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Alex Smith
Documentary/Cinematographer
1384

For me that would easily be Color Grading. After I had discovered Resolve I seriously considered pursuing being a Colorist exclusively as my career ... but as awesome as that would be, I just keep getting the general feeling that those super specialized career paths are a thing of the past :/
But thats ok too, because there are enough of all the other parts of filmmaking that I enjoy enough (Lighting and cinematography, special fx etc) that I think I would miss them if I decided to take a more narrow/focused career path.

October 24, 2014 at 12:04PM, Edited October 24, 12:04PM

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Logan Bean
Video Director / Colorist / Entrepreneur
588

AHHH, that pumped me up so much. I am trying to do exactly that. I went through a tough time earlier this year and in order to get out of the funk i dove head first into film. Since March I have made 5 shorts, won second place at a local contest, had 3 of my older shorts shown in a theater, working on a few scripts, shot my first documentary, entered 5 contest (one that won me my first lavalier mic, and two I'm currently in), and just been contacted to do a few PAYING jobs locally.

You are completely right. You basically just gotta do it, learn from it, and do it again. Write, film, edit, repeat. I still consider myself an "aspiring filmmaker" because I do not believe I deserve the title of filmmaker just yet, but I am getting there.

I am excited to be in this community of film and video lovers, I hope to meet and work with some of you in the future! Congrats on your success and I'll see you at the top!

October 24, 2014 at 2:49PM

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Franklin Carpio
Filmmaker/Director/Editor
390

Awesome man, it sounds like you're already doing some really great stuff! Good for you, I'm really glad to hear that :)

October 24, 2014 at 6:11PM

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Logan Bean
Video Director / Colorist / Entrepreneur
588

I've got some news for you Franklin, you are definitely a Filmmaker. No doubt. You absolutely deserve the title and NEED to start referring to yourself as such. So many people out there do so much less and pass themselves off as professional Filmmakers.

You are putting in the hard work, it's a done deal. You are a Filmmaker.

February 6, 2015 at 12:38PM, Edited February 6, 12:38PM

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Andrew Lewis
Writer/Director/Producer
178

Awesome man, it sounds like you're already doing some really great stuff! Good for you, I'm really glad to hear that :)

October 24, 2014 at 6:11PM

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Logan Bean
Video Director / Colorist / Entrepreneur
588

This is the first Discussion Board I've ever bothered to read... incredibly happy that I did. Thank you for posting this, really inspired by your words!

October 25, 2014 at 12:32AM

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Mariah Harrison
Editor
98

Great, great write up. I love these types of stories.
I'm a working filmmaker in LA and have shot features, pilots, etc., but articles like this- pulling up your bootstraps in order to grow as an artist and entrepreneur- fire me up. Happily handing over $2.
Thanks to you, sir, for firing me up this late morning.
- Andrew

October 25, 2014 at 2:44PM

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Andrew Rydzewski
Director & DP
86

Awesome man! Go dominate!

October 25, 2014 at 3:54PM

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Logan Bean
Video Director / Colorist / Entrepreneur
588

I'm glad you've had success on Poptent and other sites like it. I have as well, and though it's good for me and you, I wouldn't say Poptent, Zooppa, Mofilm, etc. are really a good thing. Someone said "exploitative" and I think that's dead on, and maybe there should be a discussion about it, but that's not where I'm going with this.
You gave us your story, you gave some advice, and you pedaled your wares, but you tease us with a title, "How I went from a Canon Rebel T1i to directing a $1M project" but you never mention anything about this $1M project.
How 'bout finishing your post?

October 26, 2014 at 5:51PM

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Sean Tracy
Filmmaker/Photographer
148

Hey Sean, sorry you missed it. The $1M project in question here is the product I'm directing video for at Construx. Here's a draft of a video to give you a better idea of what Im actually doing.
(Don't mind the audio hiss! Just a draft.)
https://vimeo.com/108820360

Also, I completely agree with your position on these crowd-funded spec work sites. If you're getting started and want a sandbox-like environment to hone your skills in, I think they can be pretty great for that. But if you're an experienced professional, the idea of creating work for potentially no pay not only sucks for you, but doesn't do the industry any favors either. It just continues to encourage the idea that creative professionals are ok to work for free.

October 27, 2014 at 12:29PM

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Logan Bean
Video Director / Colorist / Entrepreneur
588

Poptent and sites like it are problematic for a numbers of reasons including your points. I think it's a good opportunity for anyone who wants to try and make some extra cash but it's dangerous to dangle lines like, "in 4 days I made 45 seconds of video that won me $15,000." I could also make similar statements but the truth is I may have gotten paid $7500 for a 15 second spot, but in reality that $7500 is really payment for all the other spots I've made that didn't get purchased. Between Poptent, Zooppa, and Mofilm I've submitted more than 40 commercials this year with earnings of just under $20,000. That doesn't take into account the money and time that went into all those productions. So while it's a good opportunity to sharpen your video, audio, and copyrighting skills, I wouldn't want anyone to have a false notion that you could earn a serious living on specs.
https://www.poptent.com/user/propagandablack
And thanks for the clarity on the $1M project. Good luck with it.

October 27, 2014 at 2:16PM

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Sean Tracy
Filmmaker/Photographer
148

I see what you're saying, and I think that's a fair point.

October 28, 2014 at 1:53AM

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Logan Bean
Video Director / Colorist / Entrepreneur
588

Oh wait: the project is a $1Mproject, but the video isn't a $1M production?
In that case I worked on a few multimillion €-projects as well. Too bad most of the budget didn't go to the production of the video ;-)

Creative use of a title if this is the case :-p

December 12, 2014 at 9:14AM

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WalterBrokx
Director, DOP, Writer, Editor, Producer
8954

BTW, the lean startup method is indeed an inspiring method which canbe applied to filmmaking. I tell 'newbies' to make smal stuff first, so they can fail fast and learn even faster. Because in your first projects you will make mistakes and the quicker you can finish a project, the faster you learned not to make them again.

December 12, 2014 at 9:20AM

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WalterBrokx
Director, DOP, Writer, Editor, Producer
8954

I think I could write a book responding to this post.
First off, Logan sounds the way I would be talking to my friends 20 years ago sharing some genuine excitement and because our friends tend to think we are full of crap, adding some real examples in the equation (like logan did with links to his work).
Now because Industry types have copied that enthusiasm and that style of "down to earth" talk (complete with links to show off their "examples") millions of times over the years it makes most of us doubt Logan's sincerity and authenticity. Which sucks but that's life. Anyone posting a video nowadays of something funny or amusing that accidentally happened will first be faced with doubters (me included) to whether the video was authentic or not because so many marketers have tried to dupe us in the past. (again, I could go on how this sucks).
2. Contests and Spec work. This is also a never ending discussion but also very interesting. I think Logan nails it though that the companies "exploiting" unemployed or new or wannabe film makers for possible prizes in exchange for thousands of hours of non-paid work DO GIVE you an opportunity to learn something. Are they taking away work from the industry and from "professionals"? I think they might be in a small way but nothing that will have any long term impact. Companies who have budgets and who don't have time to spend hoping that they will be able to get a great video when they apply this fishing style approach to video procurement, will still use the professional video producer who will work closely with their team to understand their needs, provide them a script they can customize and then develop a video whose results are UNDER THEIR CONTROL. This is huge for most properly paying companies.
3 (and this is the last point despite the fact there are many more) - Selling your book for 2 bucks I think is below the threshold of making Logan's piece a hidden advertisement and reflects the "if I give it to you for free you won't respect it, mentality." Personally I would put selling the book at 5 bucks or more, even though still cheap, as a potential to making his article an advertorial contender .... I think for a lot of start up film makers, the advice that Logan put up is already worth at least 3.50, hehehe.
4 (and this is not a point, this is for @Sean Tracy) - I agree that the title could seem misleading but Logan actually mentions that he went from his consumer level camera to getting a job at Construx (Wait!! This is not an ad for construx is it ... more of my paranoia sets in) .... And through his job at Construx he is now responsible for making videos valued at millions of dollars .... At least that is what I understood. Logan says "I work directly with the CEO and see firsthand what kinds of logic, decisions and management principles go into a launching a multi-million dollar project."

Okay NFS, I have posted before under Jakartaguy (mainly complaining about how my country has banned Vimeo) but I look forward to contributing further as an "out in the open" member! Cheers from Jakarata, edwinp

October 27, 2014 at 12:07AM

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Edwin Pieroelie
Managing Director
29

This is a great story. Congrats on your success and sharing. We have started our first film production company a year ago. We have just wrapped up our 1 first web series. We have made several music videos and short documentaries.
Example - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TWDrJXtzkiQ
I look at these websites and submitted a couple to the briefs that I think is our style. Im excited to try several that may be out of our scope to keep learning and growing as a film maker. On the local side I believe that small business need professional short commercials for their business.
Example of something we did 9 months ago - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=alaoAY-rc70

I look forward to learning more from your course.

October 28, 2014 at 5:25PM, Edited October 28, 5:25PM

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Carl Busch
Film Maker
164

Very good article! I thought the same thing as everyone else when I got to the part of the $500 course now being offered for $2.... but after reading how you respond to each of the comments I can see that your article was genuine. I dont blame you for plugging in your stuff, hey we gotta eat somehow. 2 bucks isnt bad when we spend way more on junk anyways. At any rate, thanks for sharing your experience. Success whether it be our own or someone else's, is still motivating!

October 29, 2014 at 10:05AM, Edited October 29, 10:05AM

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Luis Garcia
Director/Editor
359

Thanks Luis, best of luck to you on your next projects!

October 29, 2014 at 12:49PM

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Logan Bean
Video Director / Colorist / Entrepreneur
588

Hi Logan - Thanks for the article. I'm just starting out in filmmaking and already find myself commiting the worst of crimes; looking at gear, trawling through NFS and watching YouTube instructionals rather than getting out there and making more things - something I plan on rectifying immediately. It's really good to see some solid advice for newbies, and for a few pointers at opportunities to cut your teeth on. Much appreciated.

November 19, 2014 at 1:56PM

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Tim Ryan
Film Production Newbie
81

Dear Logan! Thanks for a great read, it really inspired to me actually get out there and try and actually film things instead of looking online on trying to be a better filmmaker. I was also wondering if you could give me a bit of advice? I'm currently 10 weeks into my first year at university studying psychology but I'm really starting to feel that its not what I want to be doing any more. Ive always kind of wanted to get into the film industry somehow but had kind of been given the advice of doing a more 'credited' subject and psychology did and still does interest me. However I feel now I really know what I want to do and that is to get into film which I was always going to do after I graduated anyway. I've really been considering dropping out and getting an apprenticeship (I have an interview with a smallish company that makes corporate videos for businesses). Do you think getting an apprenticeship is a better route into the film industry? Or should I graduate with a Psychology degree, making films and being a Runner etc in the times I have off?
Thank you,
Silas

December 7, 2015 at 8:58AM, Edited December 7, 8:58AM

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Why do you ask a random guy about how you should live YOUR life? Psychology is really useful in filmmaking, so it's not like your learning sth totally not related to it. You need to be the one to make a decision or else you might regret it in the future if you let someone else to take it for you.

December 15, 2015 at 6:17PM

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Andy Tokarski
Director, Editor, Colorist
1332

I can't help but think that it sounded like Silas was asking for some advice, not for someone to make a decision for him.

Personally I would say if he is going to have a bunch of debt from college, that is only going to complicate what he can and can't do in the future. Psychology just like anything can be learned online today between videos, blogs, etc...

Just my opinion.

March 23, 2016 at 9:33AM

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Derek Armitage
Filmmaker & Vlogger
535

Why did Poptent go broke?

February 2, 2016 at 11:09PM

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Milan Schere
Director
196

Yeah? ^

May 30, 2016 at 2:06PM, Edited May 30, 2:06PM

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Clark McCauley
Spaceman
2061

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