July 19, 2015 at 2:23AM

4

Upgrading from D600, need suggestions

Currently I have been using a combination of Fuji X-T1 and Nikon D600. I shoot 90% of my stills with the fuji as I love the way the camera handles, the quality of the lenses, the look of the images, and manageable file sizes. The only drawbacks of the camera are the relatively low resolution (usually not an issue) and it's useless for video. I've held on to the Nikon for the occasional video work I have a bunch of lenses.

Now that I'm doing more video projects I feel the need to replace the D600 with something more suitable to my needs.

I need a real workhorse. I work a lot in the field, traveling and shooting a wide range of subject matter. I would really like to keep things simple and light and not lug around two separate systems. I want one camera for both high quality stills and HD video which rules out the GH4 (not good enough for stills). The Nikon D810 appeals to me for stills due to it's 36mp (i frequently make large prints), high FPS and 16mp in crop mode making it very versatile. However the D750 has a lot going for it too... Lighter weight, SD cards, and tilt screen. I can make do with 24mp.

Even though I said I want to stick with one camera, I am also drawn to some of the new compact hybrid 4k cameras that are coming out like the Sony RX100ii and the Panasonic GX8. seems like they could easily fit into my bag and they offer in camera stabilization which makes handheld work so so much easier.

So my question is, does the D750 offer a lot more in terms of video capabilities (tilt screen can be so useful sometimes) to warrant choosing it over a the D810 which ultimately shoots higher quality stills? Or should I be looking at something else entirely? What would you get if you were in my position?

6 Comments

Both the Nikon D750 and D810 shoot good quality 1080HD video, and are excellent still-photo cameras. The Nikon D600 has aliasing and moire issues when shooting video, so simply upgrading to the D750 or D810 will produce a better video image.

If you want to get into an affordable compact 4K video camera, the new Sony RX10 Mk2 looks like it might fit the bill for you.

Andrew Reid at EOSHD Reviews the Sony RX10 Mk2
http://goo.gl/ijGqXD

July 19, 2015 at 12:04PM

3
Reply
Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
30531

yeah, i meant the rx10ii, not rx100. it seems like a really well featured camera.

July 20, 2015 at 6:37PM

0
Reply
Marc Gabor
Photographer, videograpehr
88

Hi there,
Both Nikons are excellent. But also consider Sony A7 Mk2. It has a throughput of around 50mbps and addition to it is the hybrid focusing system. Just check it out.

July 20, 2015 at 6:09AM

0
Reply
avatar
Dibyendu Joardar
Director of Photography
692

Way off topic, kind of. So you prefer image quality better on XT-1 compare to D600?(talking about stills =) BTW). I would think opposite, very interesting. I mean minus the file size and all. So does the XT-1 focus faster and more accurate including low light situation and back lit situation that is? Please LMK I am thinking about getting a D600 used for stills and really interested to hear what you have to say. Thank you.

July 21, 2015 at 7:55PM

8
Reply
Keith Kim
Photographer
1510

It's not a clear cut answer and my preference for x-t1 is not based on technical image quality alone. The D600 when paired with sharp lens and focused properly will ultimately deliver images with higher resolution, more dynamic range, better high ISO, etc... It has a more capable and advanced focusing system as well..

However, i just find that the X-T1 is an easier camera to work with for the way I shoot. The lenses are all very sharp and have a very consistent look from one to another. This is huge. You need really good Nikon/Zeiss glass to match the Fuji's lenses. Also the colors from the Fuji are great, not that the Nikon's are bad, but the Fuji just seems to excel in this area. I think there might be less dynamic range and there for the RAW files look a little punchier out of camera. The Nikon files definitely have more latitude and more recoverability in post.

The EVF allows me to easily punch in and make sure the focus is perfect with out removing my eye from the viewfinder. I use manual focus a lot and it works great this way.

The battery on the Nikon lasts way longer too.

The nikon will appeal to you if you want a camera that does what a FF DSLR is supposed to do - hi res RAW files with lots of information, a lens mount that has been standard for over 50 years, more control over DOF, long battery life, optical viewfinder, etc...
The X-T1 is a different shooting experience. Coming from rangefinders, I find the X-T1 gives me the small form factor, simple manual controls and sharp optics I'm used to while being a much more flexible and useful camera than a Leica.

July 22, 2015 at 11:12AM

4
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Marc Gabor
Photographer, videograpehr
88

After much deliberation I've decided that I'm gonna make the fuji work for stills and use a GH4 for video. The logic is that the GH4 will make a versatile, compact camera that I can grow with. All my Nikon glass will work great on the GH4. I see how I could have replaced everything with a Sony A7RII but that would mean much much bulkier lenses to cover the long end and poor battery life. Being light means I can get a lighter tripod as well. Trying to factor in my back!
16mp from the Fuji will limit how much I can crop but other than that I'm extremely pleased with the image quality and the compact nature of the body and lenses means I can easily pack the GH4 and the Fuji into one kit. Kind of nice to have video and stills capture on separate cards.

July 23, 2015 at 1:34PM

0
Reply
Marc Gabor
Photographer, videograpehr
88

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