September 5, 2014 at 1:51AM

3

What is your favorite film making moment?

Throughout all the work you have done. What moment stands out to you the most? Not your best shot or greatest focus pull but, the moment you know you will have for the rest of your life

20 Comments

While shooting a short film a few years ago, we were in need of a reflector to provide some fill light but we didn't have one. Of course, what indie filmmaker is gonna let that stop them? Someone noticed that the pizza boxes from lunch were predominately white, and in one of those brilliantly simple moments of indie filmmaking genius we used a pizza box as a reflector. That was the moment I realized what indie filmmaking is all about, and I will never forget it!

September 5, 2014 at 3:22AM

2
Reply
avatar
Douglas Henderson
Director/Writer/Producer/Actor
949

The first short film I shot wasn't planned out like it should have been. Thus a lot of shots were run and gun and thought up on the fly. We had never used a Jib before but had one on hand from some friends and were shooting a scene where a car pulls up > Bring the arm down to another character > swing left to reveal both characters. We shot that and happened to have time to review the shot during lunch. The moment I played it back and saw how well we pulled it off, it made me realize that I wanted to be shooting for the rest of my life. To go from an idea in your head to watching it play back on a screen is absolutely incredible.

September 5, 2014 at 11:27AM

2
Reply
avatar
Alex Smith
Documentary/Cinematographer
1378

#Ifeelyou.

November 26, 2014 at 11:23AM

10
Reply
avatar
Tommy Plesky
Director / D.P / Editor
1934

We had to shoot a scene where a guy is running away from some dudes and the wewanted it to be as immersive as possible. One of my friends had this idea of the camera being one of the guys in the chase to which i responded: "That's a great idea, we are doing that."
So it came the time to shoot and it was just the most amazing thing I have done. I was in there with the camera, jumping over and off walls, running through people, pushing them away, going in between cars (we were shooting guerilla style so no one even knew that we were shooting a film, which made the scene even more amazing).
I remember that I wanted to get a in front of the runner and see his face, but there was a wall around 10 meters away, so what I did is I ran in front of him, jumped and while I was in the air turned around and kept running backwards and that moment alone is just amazing.
The film isn't finished yet, but when it gets finished I'll make sure you guys can see it :)

September 5, 2014 at 3:02PM, Edited September 5, 3:02PM

12
Reply
avatar
Dominik Belancic
Cinematographer/Director
261

Sounds awesome! Can't wait to see it!

September 5, 2014 at 4:28PM

0
Reply
avatar
David S.
2852

It will be loooong wait since we can only shoot every other weekend, but it will be worth it (I hope) :)

September 5, 2014 at 6:20PM

0
Reply
avatar
Dominik Belancic
Cinematographer/Director
261

have any teasers?

September 6, 2014 at 5:45PM

0
Reply
avatar
Alex Smith
Documentary/Cinematographer
1378

The short film I just finished was one of the most stressful yet rewarding experiences of my life. I had to film a daylight scene and only had my actor for one more day. We had maybe an hour of optimal daylight left and I had no cinematographer that day. I wanted to film myself in the mirror with my actor over my shoulder sitting on a bed behind me. However, standing up would cut my actor out and block him from view. So we had my boom mic on a stand and my camera off to the side of the mirror. We decided to put the mirror on a small night stand and I got on my knees in front of the mirror.

This was going to be the final scene of the movie, and had to be absolutely perfect. There I was, on my knees having to lean ridiculously to get to the record button and somehow get back into frame and deliver the closing lines of the film, as well as pay attention to my actor to give him any direction. We managed to do the scene in two takes, and had daylight left over. Playing it back on the camera, I could not have been more happy with this ridiculous situation, the look was exactly what I was going for and you have no idea I'm on my knees in front of this mirror sitting on a night stand propped up against a door. Watching that scene at the end of the finished film, it's hard not to tear up.

Ingenuity and resourcefulness is the bread and butter of an independent filmmaker and I was proud of myself for pulling something like that off. I won't forget that moment for a long time.

September 10, 2014 at 3:34PM

0
Reply
avatar
Kenny Harris
Writer/Director/Editor
154

For me, i was shooting a scene before and it was very sunny outside and then the rain came (Thunder and lightning).. and i had to recreate the sunlight scene in the house as best as i could... thats the hardest lighting setup i've ever done with the types of lights i had but i was proud of myself that i could actually pull it off with a set of softbox . a LED light panel and a Scarf lol

September 11, 2014 at 8:48PM, Edited September 11, 8:48PM

0
Reply
avatar
Wentworth Kelly
DP/Colorist/Drone Op
2356

I don't know if this counts since I wasn't actually shooting anything...

Anyway, I was in the 48 Hr. Film Project this year in Chicago. I hadn't really done much in terms of filmmaking. I'm the kind of guy who always has the greatest ideas for a film (just like you), but never really does anything about it. So I figured this would be a great opportunity to do something about it. It was a wild 48 Hrs and I ended up being relatively proud of the outcome for only having a 3 person crew and 1 actress.

But the thing that'll stand out in my mind for a long time was at the screening, after my film had played, I heard someone a few rows away say, "That was my favorite one." Accomplishment!

September 17, 2014 at 8:33PM, Edited September 17, 8:33PM

0
Reply
avatar
Paul Gall
Writer / Director / Editor
175

This one’s a little strange as it happened so long ago, and it didn’t launch me into a filmmaking career at the time, but whenever I look back on it I just love it so much.

Sixteen years ago, when I was 18, some friends and I decided one Saturday afternoon that I was borrowing my parent’s Hi8 camcorder and we were going to make a short film. We’d fooled around with recording sports and goofy stuff before, but this time we wanted to make an actual story and have it look like a real movie.

One problem: we didn’t have any editing equipment and so the only way we could make clean cuts was in the camcorder. I felt I’d seen enough movies that I knew what to do and could just edit in the camera while we were shooting. I’d simply start and stop at the right times, and it would hopefully turn out okay. We decided to do an action movie, which required some quick match-cuts (though I didn’t know of that term at the time). I just went for it, and my friends, hearing the “beep … beep beep” for each shot thought I wasn’t recording enough action, but my gut told me it was working. We couldn’t review the footage, as that would mess up the clean cuts in the camcorder, so we kept going, making up the story as we went along, me continuing to “cut” with my gut, and after an hour or so we went back into the house to see what we had.

When we played back the footage on the TV, we were so excited. It had turned out even better than I thought! It looked like a real action movie. I mean it had an awful plot, lack of soundtrack, cheesy acting and shaky camerawork, but to us, it was golden. It was at that moment I knew I not only loved moviemaking, but also had a natural knack for it. (Although ironically, it was only a hobby for me for the next ten years and only now am I getting into it.)

Years later, I dug up that footage and added a soundtrack, which amazingly lined up perfectly with the original footage, cuts still exactly as I recorded them in-camera. I also removed some scenes from the end where our story direction really fell apart and added some cheesy credits to it. I was actually just watching it yesterday and it brought back some great memories. I uploaded it to Vimeo just now if any of you are interested in seeing it: https://vimeo.com/107406961

I’ve watched it probably five times in the past two days and I still find it very affirming and inspiring. It makes me want to go out and film something again. Something other than documentaries, which is what I’m primarily doing right now.

Thanks for the great question. I look forward to seeing the scenes each of you are talking about. :)

September 28, 2014 at 3:59PM

0
Reply
avatar
Ryan Toyota
Graphic Designer / Typographer / Video Editor
1236

Really inspiring! One thing: The video seems to be private, can you unlock it? I'm curious.

November 26, 2014 at 9:51AM

4
Reply
avatar
Samuel Zerbato
Aspiring Filmmaker / DP
8

Whoops, sorry about that. I was cleaning up my profile a bit since I’m applying for jobs and didn’t want this to be one of my most recent videos. I’ve made it password protected instead, so it won’t show up on my profile but you can still watch it. The password is “nofilmschool” :)

November 28, 2014 at 11:21AM

0
Reply
avatar
Ryan Toyota
Graphic Designer / Typographer / Video Editor
1236

It says it's private.

November 26, 2014 at 11:22AM

5
Reply
avatar
Tommy Plesky
Director / D.P / Editor
1934

The intro of Jurassic Park

September 30, 2014 at 7:56AM

0
Reply
avatar
Ragüel Cremades
Film producer and director
7594

You were involved in making Jurassic Park?

October 1, 2014 at 3:56AM

6
Reply
avatar
Ryan Toyota
Graphic Designer / Typographer / Video Editor
1236

As an observer/audience:
Watching Apocalypse Now for the first time. Such an unreal experience. Little did I know at that time that I'd end up in filmmaking, it just seemed unattainable at that time (I'm from a country with very little in terms of a film scene and come from a rather blue collar background).
Then again watching Tree of Life. The non-linear narrative (or absence of narrative) felt so freeing to me, paired with utterly fantastic images..

As a filmmaker:
The first directing gig I had. We shot over three nights in the summer in the southern Alps, big cranes, 35mm with the then newly released Vision3 stock. I dreamt up this project and was at the steering wheel seeing it unfold in front of my eyes with all these experienced heavyweights in all the departments pushing for my vision. It was an unreal experience and it launched my career (as tough as it still is).
And the last shoot I was on, just last week, when we recreated a fantastic light setup that would make Haneke and Ulrich Seidl more than proud. With the actors delivering on every single take and the first rough cut making eyes wet a little.
I love filmmaking, man...

November 26, 2014 at 9:46AM

0
Reply
Elias Ressegatti
Director
277

I once started producing a video mostly for myself, It was a reminder of why do I do what I do. I kept on making the video, selecting the videos I wanted, adding some of my own footage and making it perfect so whenever I felt uninspired I could sit down, watch that video and get back on track.
When I finished that video, my brother was the only one to see it, he inmediately said, you should share this, more people like you can get inspired by this. I thought that wasn't a bad idea, after all, the video was made to inspire the "artist" the "creative people" to don't stop, to forget the status quo we live in, to forget about what society thinks and more than anything to follow their intuition.
So I did, I shared it, 1 week later my video had more than 1,500 shares in Facebook (I know that is not that much but for my first video I thought that was huge.) But the part that made me feel really good was the following;
I got a call from a friend who's studying in one of the best universities in México (TEC de Monterrey) and all of a sudden he tells me: "Dude, they are playing your video for all the students starting the arts faculties (Film production, design, music, etc)" And he sent me a picture of a huge hall full of people watching my video. I think it was back then when I realized I could touch people with my sensitivity.

Here's the video in case some of you are interested: https://vimeo.com/90714491

November 26, 2014 at 11:19AM, Edited November 26, 11:19AM

0
Reply
avatar
Tommy Plesky
Director / D.P / Editor
1934

That time when I see all the different pieces of my film fit together in a rough-edit. That's my favorite.

Either that, or when I begin coloring in post and my clips turn from dull to dynamic.

November 26, 2014 at 2:20PM

1
Reply
avatar
Brandon Neubert
Color Artist / Writer / Director
728

We had worked a few weeks, actually months on a intro short for a TV show in Norway. But we started to get really tired of trying to put this together the right way. The problem was that we lacked a really great soundtrack. We had testet out like 8 or 9 different versions from our musiccomposer. But it just did not give us the kick we wanted.

We told each other to NOT give up. After better communication and some more of NOT giving up, we finally got it. AND it was perfect!

November 27, 2014 at 5:38AM

2
Reply
avatar
Arvid André Knutsen
DP, Director, Writer, VFX Artist
75

Your Comment