November 7, 2016 at 1:37AM

5

AVID vs Premier Pro

I Have Experience in Premier Pro , But a lots of people say AVID is Professional Video editing software used in hollywood movies , i am confused should i completely stick with
Premier Pro or AVID , can a feature film be edited completely with premier pro and after effect ( or Nuke ) ...

16 Comments

If you find yourself in a shop that has already standardized on AVID, then you have to learn AVID in order to work with others. If you are doing you own film, you can absolutely finish a feature film in Premiere Pro, FCPX, or even Davinci Resolve. After Effects, Nuke, etc., are just icing on the cake. And if you are doing a film with friends, and they, too, know Premiere Pro, FCPX, After Effects, Nuke, etc., that's cool too. The only time you really need AVID is when it's already installed and already standard in the work environment you seek to join.

November 7, 2016 at 5:36AM

4
Reply

i see my future in Full Feature Movie Maker , So that's why i was asking that i am already familiar with premier pro should i go for AVID or a feature film can be edited and produced with premier pro and after effects , obviously they play 4K videos in cinema , as far as i know , i guess ... THANKS FOR YOUR REPLY

Arsh DSJ

November 11, 2016 at 5:54AM

Avid is a great editor, but that's about all it does. That's why they use it in Hollywood; they have a dedicated editor, a dedicated compositor (or 500 compositors these days), dedicated colorist etc. Premiere does a bit more but isn't as intuitive or efficient IMO. I've used probably a dozen different editors and at my day job, they do everything with Premiere. At home, I use Vegas because I can do 98% of what I need with it and it has a super efficient work-flow.

November 7, 2016 at 9:10AM, Edited November 7, 9:10AM

1
Reply

Intuivity is for a great part what you are used to.
To me Premiere Pro feels intuitive, but hey, I've been using it since 2000.

WalterBrokx

November 9, 2016 at 7:16AM, Edited November 9, 7:16AM

i was asking that i am already familiar with premier pro should i go for AVID or a feature film can be edited and produced with premier pro and after effects , obviously they play 4K videos in cinema , as far as i know , i guess ... THANKS FOR YOUR REPLY

Arsh DSJ

November 11, 2016 at 5:52AM

The question is: do you want to work in Hollywood?
If yes: you should probably learn AVID.

AVID is used a lot for features for several reasons:
- 'tradition': some houses have been using AVID since the 90s. If it ain't broken...
- the ability to have a server with all footage of a feature and letting dozens of people work on it at the same time (still the main difference with Premiere Pro, but they are working on closing that gap in CC for Enterprises)

November 9, 2016 at 7:21AM

1
Reply
avatar
WalterBrokx
Director, DOP, Writer, Editor, Producer
9100

Not exactly Hollywood but BOLLYWOOD , i will definitely start with youtube short films , but i see my future in Full Feature Movie Maker , So that's why i was asking that i am already familiar with premier pro should i go for AVID or a feature film can be edited and produced with premier pro and after effects , obviously they play 4K videos in cinema , as far as i know , i guess ... THANKS FOR YOUR REPLY

Arsh DSJ

November 11, 2016 at 5:51AM, Edited November 11, 5:51AM

For what it's worth I have edited a feature film on Premiere. It's entirely possible and anyone that says it's not doesn't really understand or like premiere because they're probably used to something else.

I work at a place that's 100% Premiere, which is great for me because that's what I use for my own projects as well. I know it and I like how much you can throw at it (codecs, effects, etc) and it just works.

Avid is great if you really know how to use Avid. And hollywood is changing and there are many places using Premiere. My advice? Learn both.

November 9, 2016 at 12:31PM

2
Reply

I have been editing for over 15 years and am currently editing a film in Premiere. So yes, it is totally possible and will not be a problem. The reason why Avid is used so much in the industry is its already in place. Most studios/larger post houses have built their complete workflow around it and if it ain't broke don't fix it. Also they have invested tons of money and time into building their internal workflow, they don't want to spend more. It works great with large shared projects and is, IMO, the best at asset management. Premiere is quickly catching up in these areas so its positive you will see it a lot more in the post workflow. Right now they are are close enough in terms of power to just pick the one you want. Its like picking a BMW or Mercedes, they are both good, just a matter of opinion. My advice as an editor is be able to use any system.

November 9, 2016 at 5:05PM, Edited November 9, 5:05PM

2
Reply
avatar
Alex Gans
Director/Editor
151

Its A choice... There were Studios in Hollywood who were bent on the Final Cut system being the Best and They switched to Adobe. Some Avid Post Houses have made the switch as well to Premiere Because Adobe is a full suite that can get you from point a To Point B. Now Davinci is pretty much a full scale suite and i know Blackmagic working on making Both Davinci and Fusion work with each other (may have even happened already). What you want to learn are the tools and that knowledge is easy to migrate to different platforms.

November 9, 2016 at 8:08PM

2
Reply
avatar
Wentworth Kelly
Director/DP/Colorist/Drone Op
1997

Like others said, post houses and long time hollywood editors are invested in AVID and when you're dealing with massive amounts of footage, where stability is key, AVID does really shine. AVID workstations are built from the ground up as dedicated PCs. Custom drivers. Custom accelerator add-ons and specific EVERYTHING. An AVID workstation doesn't talk nicely with Adobe products actually, besides maybe PS. Something always suffers. We've gone many years trying to have both work efficiently on a single PC and it's ALWAYS been a headache in one way or another. We still have 1 AVID system, strictly for some legacy projects.

But AdobeCC is gold when you don't have dedicated jobs and everyone has to do a little of everything. We've found paying so much more for AVID and getting essentially a whole lot less, wasn't a good road to stay on.

But yeah, it's best to know both if you're bouncing around. And frankly, it doesn't take long to learn. A rolling edit or a ripple is what it is on any software;) The buttons and shortcuts are just different, which can be customized anyway.

November 10, 2016 at 9:41AM

2
Reply
avatar
Josh.R
Motion Designer/Predator
775

So Can A Feature Film Be Done Using Premier Pro With No Problem Like AVID ... Thanks For Your Answers :)

November 11, 2016 at 6:00AM

1
Reply
avatar
Arsh DSJ
Director Editor Producer
306

Features can be cut on both. And FCPX. Which is why you should learn both. Don't limit yourself. I teach Avid, Premiere, and FCPX. My students leave my school knowing them all. So any job they look for, they never have to worry about software holding them back.

I've been using AVID for 20 years, but FCPX is my go to. BUT if the film requires FX, I go with Premiere because of its integration with After Effects and Photoshop.

Knowing them all allows you to decided which to use based on project needs, not your own technical limitations.

Also, Michael Tiemann's comment is right on the money-- you should learn ALL the programs you can Nuke, Resolve, Motion, etc.

As I tell my students: some kid in middle school is already learning it, they are your competition.

November 11, 2016 at 11:03AM, Edited November 11, 11:03AM

0
Reply
Chriss Williams
Film Professor
81

Also, I would like to add that based on my experience with Avid at my current job (we use Macs), it is by no means a no problems ever piece of software. We've had many crashes and funny error messages. I'm not saying it's better or worse than anything else, it's just I would never describe Avid as "no problem". Nothing is. Backup and duplicate. :D

November 11, 2016 at 12:02PM

0
Reply

Some really good answers here. One key thing though — don't put too much stock in "what people say" or their opinion that a tool is or is not "professional". Far too many decisions are made on hearsay based on more hearsay, and apps evolve faster than old workflows do.

Edit in whatever you like, learn them all if you can. If you are being paid to get the finished edit into the format you need to deliver, it's "professional".

November 11, 2016 at 8:05PM

5
Reply

I agree with Iain Anderson. He left nothing for me.

November 12, 2016 at 7:16AM, Edited November 12, 7:16AM

0
Reply
avatar
Dibyendu Joardar
Director of Photography
597

Your Comment