May 19, 2015 at 8:26PM

9

Beefed up desktop or go for a Workstation?

My Samsung (8gb ram, less than adequate gpu, i7) laptop is ready to be laid to rest, and since I recently bought a GH4, it can't handle the 4k. What are my options as far as computers?

Most of my work will be 4K with either the GH4 and the a7s. Some RED, some FS7 work.

Some swear by Mac, I would prefer PC , what computer could handle, and then some, of my work? I obviously want this machine to last me a good while as this will be a large investment for me. Id rather not build but have something ready soon! I'd really appreciate the help!

12 Comments

The cheapest high power Windows PC for video editing is going to be a custom gaming rig, as both video gaming and video editing have similar hardware needs.

Best Gaming Desktops 2015
http://www.tomsguide.com/us/best-gaming-pc,review-2219.html

May 19, 2015 at 10:34PM

2
You voted '+1'.
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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
30892

I have to disagree with you on this one guy. I have built about 10 computers over the years. Gaming video cards are usually not very good for video editing. My suggestion is to go find an online community for your NLE and ask what type of cards play nice with it.
I used a card that is oriented for CAD and graphics for use with Sony Vegas Pro 13.
One thing that mfgs go cheap on is power supply. I buy the best I can and usually used. Last time I got a pc power and cooling silencer power supply used off amazon.com. They are pricy, but pwr supplies are where everybody goes cheap, but if reliability is important and it is important, buy the best possible. Toms hardware online is a good place to go to get reviews. I will go cheap on lots of parts, but not power supply, I learned the hard way.

May 24, 2015 at 1:12PM, Edited May 24, 1:12PM

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>>>Gaming video cards are usually not very good for video editing

...And I am going to completely disagree with you on this.

Here is the list of Adobe recommended video cards for Premiere Pro CC, and you will notice that close to half of the cards on this list are GAMING cards.

https://helpx.adobe.com/premiere-pro/system-requirements.html

The same goes for Sony Vegas, though Vegas works better with OpenCL on AMD video gaming cards than CUDA on nVidia cards.

Guy McLoughlin

May 24, 2015 at 3:28PM, Edited May 24, 3:28PM

another point is that often you can find someone to assemble your computer for $50 or less, there are just a few parts and cable routing is the difficult part and knowing where to hook up what, most shops will do it for under $100 and test your computer too.

May 24, 2015 at 1:14PM

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If you are a tech head then you can save a little money building your own rig ( or having someone assemble it for you ), but if you need support when your computer is acting up then you might want the comfort of buying from a well supported brand.

Guy McLoughlin

May 24, 2015 at 3:35PM

Hi,
I went the PC desktop route and couldn't be happier. Sure it can't play some Mac-only ProRes BUT it cost me around $1300 for 32GB ram, a couple of solid states for the OS and project cache, the case, motherboard, power supply, etc etc. It's a pretty beefy machine. The graphics card is not a super high-end Nvidia (only about 512 CUDA cores and 2GB Ram) but it can nearly play RED 4k raw files in real-time and handle most anything else I throw at it. And that was nearly a year ago now, so you can get something even better for around that price.

Check out ibuypower.com (silly name) or a similar gaming site and select a pre-built unit and then customize it to your heart's desire. Find the best graphics card, motherboard, etc. And they'll put it all together for you and make sure all the parts are compatible. Or, if you want so save some money and are down to build it yourself (which was what I did for my current computer) just build it on one of those sites and then find each of those components on Amazon and order them all that way. They'll come faster and you'll save a few hundred bucks.

May 24, 2015 at 3:27PM, Edited May 24, 3:33PM

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Still disagree with you Guy about gaming cards, I think it is bad advice, Sony themselves don't recommend them, but I would assume that any video card that is recommended for your NLE by the mfg and that is my advice and I took that advice with my last build.
The needs of games and the needs of an NLE are far different.

May 25, 2015 at 3:42PM

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>>>Still disagree with you Guy about gaming cards, I think it is bad advice, Sony themselves don't recommend them

Actually if you go on the Sony Vegas Pro forums you will see that many working professionals that are using GAMING cards and getting significant performance increases.

I recently added a $300 AMD R9 280X card to my main i7 system and was able to cut my Vegas Pro 13 rendering times in HALF just by adding this card to my system.

So again, I disagree that you need to add an expensive CAD card when a high performance gaming card can achieve essentially the same performance at a much lower price.

May 25, 2015 at 4:10PM

0
Reply
Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
30892

I run Vegas Pro 12/13; Resolve 11; Premiere Pro cc and started with 1 Quadro 4000 on a x58 board and an i7-930 cpu. Upgraded to a dual quadro 4000 and then a hex core xenon with the same x58 chipset motherboard and added dual gtx-980 gpu cards. I am getting decent playback performance with Resolve and rendering times, at this point the bottleneck is the MB, but for my work real time performance is just fine. There will be no more upgrades to this system, I will build a new PC with a z97 chipset, an 8 core cpu, will reuse the gtx-980's and have a thunderbolt connection for my external storage. Perhaps a year or two from now as my system is doing everthing I need now, no need for further upgrades till something chages or need to work in 4k natively.

May 25, 2015 at 4:35PM

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Malcolm Matusky
Producer
169

I think if I build another computer this year it's going to be on a X99 platform.

May 26, 2015 at 7:48AM

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I went PC route.....and ending up changing weeks after, it wasn't me, but my clients and the people i often work with, that couldn't get past not using Pro Res( i know there is software you can use to get pro res on PC) . it was just a matter of ease having it natively
luckily the system was built with the possibility of turning into a Hackintosh. So i did, and haven't looked back

May 26, 2015 at 8:22PM, Edited May 26, 8:23PM

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Have you noticed any Lags or issues with the change to Hackintosh?
what hardware do you have working on it?

Aaron Miller

May 28, 2015 at 11:51AM

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