April 1, 2016 at 2:11PM, Edited October 30, 11:59AM

0

Best lightweight steadicam with Canon C100 mark 11

I am a petit woman and will be shooting wedding films using the canon c100 11. I hate the idea of wearing a vest and spending alot of time balancing the camera. I tried the glidecam HD2000 which was too heavy and a pain to balance. I like the idea of the tool-less steadicams. All the ones that look attractive won't handle the weight. Anyone have any suggestions for a small shooter? B&H recommended the steadicam solo or the Came H4. Budget is a concern.

19 Comments

How do you think you can do weddings with a steadycam if you do not want to wear a vest?

I would suggest a Panasonic GH4 or G7 or a Sony A7s on a gimbal mounted on a monopod!

April 1, 2016 at 11:13PM

0
Reply
avatar
Cary Knoop
Member
2278

That was my first instinct, but is the rolling shutter a problem? Also the full sensor in the canon c 100 ii is nice. Are you saying for a small person as a one woman shooter it's worth the compromise?

Beth Cramer

April 2, 2016 at 11:35AM

Rolling shutter a problem? Conceivably you want a stabilizer to get stable shots not for fast pans. You comment about 'woman shooter' is uncalled for.

Cary Knoop

April 2, 2016 at 12:32PM

Are you serious? I merely meant my size (which I guess I already specified). As a feminist I didn't think that would get a reaction. To set the record straight I am a person. Regardless I'm sorry my thread offended you.

April 2, 2016 at 1:46PM, Edited April 2, 1:46PM

0
Reply
Beth Cramer
director/editor
81

Nothing to do with your size but everything with you hating to wear a vest and not wanting to spend time balancing. In that case a steady cam is simply not meant for you. Being small and/or a woman has nothing to do with it. It is an excuse, because I think that both small people and women can perfectly well operate a steadycam but you need a vest and you do have to spend time balancing.

Cary Knoop

April 2, 2016 at 10:05PM

She was Bringing up her size only to try and get people to exclude suggestions of bigger rigs. Her saying "I hate the idea of wearing a vest and spending alot of time balancing the camera" is just stating a fact, I am a man and I hate vests and balancing too. It had nothing to do with her being a woman. So instead of her saying sorry to you it should be you who says sorry.

Michael Militscher

April 4, 2016 at 6:14PM

Your Canon C100 Mk2 has a Super35 size sensor which is about half the size of a Full Frame sensor and about the same size as an APS-C sensor.

As for rolling-shutter, the Canon C300 Mk1 has a rolling shutter read speed of about 16 milliseconds, and I would expect your C100 to have a similar rolling shutter read speed. There are several compact cameras that have a sensor read speeds that is as fast or faster than 16 milliseconds:

Sony A7R II 1080p APS-C Mode : 10.5 milliseconds
Panasonic GH4 1080p : 13.7 milliseconds
Nikon D750 1080p : 14.5 milliseconds
Sony RX10 1080p : 14.8 milliseconds
Sony A6300 1080p24 : 15.2 milliseconds
Panasonic GH3 1080p : 15.5 milliseconds

So rolling shutter should not be a problem with any of the cameras in the above list, as long as you are shooting in 1080p mode. ( just like the C100 )

Your Canon C100 Mk2 with it's grip, battery, and a typical lens is going to weigh about 4 lbs, and pretty much any camera stabilizer that can handle this weight is going to weigh another 4 lbs with weights, so you are looking at a total weight of 8+ lbs that you are going to have to carry in your arms as you make your shots. This is heavy for pretty much anyone, and will quickly tire you out the longer you shoot.

The only way to get around the weight issue is to either wear a vest with a stedicam-like arm, or shoot with a lighter camera like the Panasonic GH4 which will cut the total weight in half, so you have to carry 4 lbs total instead of 8 lbs total.

As far as having a stabilizer that will set-up quickly and require little training, then you need to look at an electronic 3-axis gimbal, especially the models which feature "encoded motors". Take a look at the CheesyCam.com website for reviews on smaller camera gimbals. Also Dave Dugdale has been reviewing smaller gimbals for the past year on his YouTube channel. ( he's currently testing the brand new PilotFly H2 pistol-grip style 3-axis gimbal )

April 2, 2016 at 4:38PM, Edited April 2, 4:46PM

0
Reply
Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
30378

Guy, where are you getting that sensor read-out speed data from?

(I ask because my understanding is that the rolling shutter on the C-line from Canon is generally considered superior to most dslr's/mirrorless photo/video hybrids).

Einar Bjarni Davidsson

April 3, 2016 at 3:25PM

*moved to reply

April 3, 2016 at 3:24PM, Edited April 3, 3:25PM

0
Reply

>>>Guy, where are you getting that sensor read-out speed data from?

There's a well known member on the DvxUser website, Samuel Hurtado that's been calculating / collecting camera rolling-shutter data for the past three years. So far Samuel's numbers have held up quite well ( Blackmagic recently published official rolling shutter numbers for a bunch of their cameras and Samuel's un-official numbers were a close match )

DvxUser Forum Thread with Samuel's Collection of Rolling-Shutter Numbers
http://goo.gl/roXVzC

>>>I ask because my understanding is that the rolling shutter on the C-line from Canon is generally considered superior to most dslr's/mirrorless photo/video hybrids.

This entirely depends on the DSLR or mirror-less camera. There are some cameras like the ones I listed that are able to equal or out-perform many cine cameras when shooting 1080p footage, including the Canon C300 Mk1. I don't know if anyone has tested the newer Canon C-line cameras, but I would be very curious to see how the new C300 Mk2 numbers for 4K footage compares to the 1080p numbers.

DSLRs and Mirrorless cameras have had a bad rap when it comes to rolling-shutter skew because people have been assuming that all cameras perform the same, or that all cameras perform the same in different shooting modes. Right now the real cine cameras out-perform DSLR / Mirror-less cameras when shooting 4K footage, which I suspect is largely due to the amount of processing power required when shooting 4K. This might change completely with the next generation of DSLR / Mirror-less cameras that have more powerful image processors.

April 3, 2016 at 8:08PM, Edited April 3, 8:11PM

9
Reply
Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
30378

Thank you, very useful resource, that thread on dvxuser!

I see that mirrorless/DSLR's with 4K capabilities have very reasonable image skew in 1080p, even if their 4K leaves one wanting - makes sense. Then again, the 1080p on a primarily 4K camera often has other image trouble; crop, pixel binning, moire, aliasing etc.

But, when you say "So rolling shutter should not be a problem with any of the cameras in the above list, as long as you are shooting in 1080p mode. ( just like the C100 )", one should be aware that the Canon C-line (old sensor) is a 4K sensor with full read out, internally down-sampled to 1080p. Not all 1080p is created equal.

Einar Bjarni Davidsson

April 4, 2016 at 12:14PM

>>>Not all 1080p is created equal

Yes definitely. The Canon cine line of cameras produce an extremely sharp 1080p image that can only be equaled with DSLR / Mirror-less cameras by shooting 4K footage and down-rezzing this to 1080p. With my GH4 I always shoot 4K to get rid of any sign of moire, but this increases the sensor read-speed ( more rolling-shutter distortion ) to 22.5ms which I can live with.

April 4, 2016 at 2:22PM

0
Reply
Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
30378

Sorry for sort of derailing the thread, original poster!

My 2 cents are that if you want to be stabilized throughout the recording of a wedding there is no escaping a vest (or some Easyrig-type of setup if you go with a 3-axis gimbal) - human forearms are just too feeble! Second in shittiness only to the T-Rex... The vest-arm is also just an important part in fully stabilizing a steadicam-like rig.

As far as I'm concerned movement is overrated (and composition underrated) -I'd try to shoot a wedding with a super light tripod, plan my shots ahead and get that locked-off elegance.

April 4, 2016 at 9:42PM

0
Reply

I love my Came H4, but it's probably too small for the Canon C100. The H4 really works well for smaller cameras which is mentioned above. I also use the Devin Graham Glidecam, it's way faster to balance than the HD2000 as it's completely tool less like the H4. Only two knobs just like the H4. It's built like a tank, comes with a nice case. Though, it might still be a little heavy depending on your set up and it is quite pricey but I think well worth it. There's marking to remember where you balanced it at. The Devin Graham glide cam works for cameras 2lbs to 12lbs so it's more convenient. But I would say the cons are it's quite pricey, and you can probably get used to the weight if you just practice a lot.

April 5, 2016 at 10:27AM

4
You voted '-1'.
Reply

Oh, was reading back on some of the comments. I don't use a vest so if you get any of these you can fly without a vest. If you use the H4 you will have the smallest footprint for flying your camera but it's really only limited to small cameras mentioned above. The DG Glidecam is bigger, but the pole is telescoping so you can probably have a small footprint if needed.

Tony Adalbert

April 5, 2016 at 10:33AM

Take this with a grain of salt: Ive shoot plenty of weddings with steadycams. Not everyone in the world who operates a steady cam is Devin Graham. The heavier the camera the heavier the steadycam becomes. once you get into cinema line cameras the weight gets to a point where most people (including me) cant handle the weight with just the steady cam. I typically have a c100 set up as an a cam that i can cut back to but if im flying a camera i try to go light weight like a 5dm3 or a gh4. also you may want to reconsider using a steadycam purely because it takes alot of practice to get usable footage sometimes out of it just because you need to know the right pacing to walk, and how to control it. its not so easy to pick up and go. if your set on using a c100 on a steady cam i would go with the devin graham signature series glidecam. its really worth the price. I went from using a flycam junior which is good and all not great, but using the Devin graham signature series is so much better than anything i've ever worked with

April 5, 2016 at 11:07AM

0
Reply
avatar
Carsten Weizer
Independent swiss army knife of a film maker
308

I second:) I really love the DG glidecam.

Tony Adalbert

April 5, 2016 at 11:16AM

*shot

Carsten Weizer

April 5, 2016 at 2:52PM

I recently got a C100 mk2 and i would like to try it with an older stabilizer Blackbird...I would remove the top handle on the C100 mk2 if necessary and I will use a Canon 10-18mm STM lens (as opposed to the Tokina I have...) or maybe the 18-135mm STM lens..has anyone tried this combination...it would be for short segments...I sure hit the gym once in a while to strengthen my arms and back but trying to do steadicam-like work with anything over 5lbs will be tiring after a while...of course some videographers are stronger than others!
in any case, has anyone tried the C100 mk2 with the blackbird...? I can't afford the really expensive ones..
thanks

April 5, 2016 at 3:24PM

1
Reply
erick perdomo
videographer/editor
86

Your Comment