March 13, 2016 at 11:08AM

2

Camera settings help.

Hi,

Basically, I have a question regarding the settings of my camera - and working with different resolutions.

So, I have started filming my teammates at their Jiu Jitsu competitions; however, I would like to start incorporating more slow motion into my videos. Anyway, to do this I know that its is better to fail at 50fps (I use a Canon 70D, and mostly a Sigma 17-55 lens, and sometimes my Canon 50mm prime lens), but my Canon only films 50fps and 720p.

Anyway, my question. If you were to fit the competition would you film the whole day in the 720/50fps settings? Or would you switch between those setting (for slow motion) and the regular 1080p/24fps settings for everything else - if you only had one camera that is. And if the latter is the case, how would one deal with that in post production (Final Cut Pro)? Would you render the whole video in 720p because the slow motion parts are 720p?

Here is a link to one of my videos so that you can see what type of stuff I am filming - so that you can give me more specific advice. Please remember though that I have only had my Camera for one month and am brand new to all this so the video will not be of the standard you are accustomed too. Also, the whole thing was filmed in 1090p/24fps, however, the slow motion parts look extra crappy. Here you go:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s3oieEB45_o

Any advice or tips will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks, and best wishes.

6 Comments

Since your final film is going to be 24fps, I would film the regular ( non-slow-motion ) scenes at 1080 24p.

If you want your slow-motion shots to match with your 1080 24p regular shots, you are going to have to figure out how to down-res and degrade your 1080p shots to match the look of your 720p slow-motion shots.

Otherwise you just live with the softer look of the 720p slow-motion shots and mix them in with your 1080p regular footage.

I would do some image tests of the 1080p down-res and degrade technique to see how close you can match your 720p shots. The final look might be pretty good.

March 13, 2016 at 12:20PM

9
Reply
Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
32994

Thank you.

So you definitely wouldn't just shoot the whole day in 720/60 then? You would indeed switch between settings? :)

March 14, 2016 at 6:39AM

0
Reply
Sam
student
15

If you're exporting to 720 in the end, whats the advantage of switching resolutions? This only works with REDs which use different portions of the sensor based off of the resolution you choose, where it's best to capture with the most sensor as possible and down sample later. With a Canon DSLR it's still using the full sensor area (as far as I know). Might as well shoot everything at your deliverable resolution and then have the flexibility of everything being in high frame rate.

Clark McCauley

March 14, 2016 at 9:21AM

>>>So you definitely wouldn't just shoot the whole day in 720/60 then? You would indeed switch between settings? :)

Your slow-motion shots will easily conform to your 24p playback speed, but conforming 60p footage into a 24p timeline could make for odd looking motion. I know that I would rather play it safe and shoot at the same frame-rate that my final footage is going to be.

You also get one bonus: By shooting your regular footage as 1080p you can always crop or "re-frame" your shots in post, or create simulated camera pans/tilts in post the same way you can when shooting 4K footage for a 1080p final image size.

March 14, 2016 at 10:19AM

0
Reply
Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
32994

Or just shoot 1080p @ 30fps. I would never use 24fps for covering events, especially sports events. I use it mostly for cinematic stuff.

Clark McCauley

March 15, 2016 at 8:42AM

Hi,

I`ve done in the past using the Canon 60D, recording everything in 1080p24, (NTSC here) and 720p60 only for the slow motion segments. During post, I used Red Giant's Instant HD (now Instant 4K) to upscale the 720p footage and it did a wonderful job. As other people suggested, the inverse could be done to, downscaling 1080p footage to 720p or cropping it while working in a 720p project timeline. As you are shooting sports, perhaps shooting 30p is a better idea, and leave 24p only for more filmic/cinematic stuff.

March 15, 2016 at 9:55AM, Edited March 15, 9:56AM

3
Reply
Ulises Bravo
Filmmaker, DP
191

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