December 11, 2016 at 10:07PM

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Confused to choose a camera

Hello. Im new here. Im so confused to choose those cameras :
Panasonic : g7 or gx8 or gx85
Sony : a6300

Which is best for cinema making low budget?
I heard panasonic doesnt have cine like picture style, than sony has slog.

But, gx85 has dual is, meanwhile a6300 has superfast focus.

Im looking forward for slowmotion videos too, i heard sony a6300 has 120fps recording.

Also, when i buy a camera, should i buy with it's standard kit lens or body only?

3 Comments

Image stabilization will be a detriment to your development as a cinematographer. It makes stable shots easier to novices, but real cinema cameras (and most pro video cameras) don't have that feature, so you won't learn how to handle them properly. You also won't care about auto-focus. AF is great for casual shooting, quick & dirty image gathering etc. but in cinema, you pull focus and set it manually so there's no possibility of error.

Between those choices, I'd probably go with the Sony. It has larger pixels and a better CODEC for HD capture (though you can always tack on an external recorder later). I know everybody is obsessed with useless marketing pixels, but UHD is stupid at this point and being able to get the cleanest HD capture possible is in your best interest. You'll have less rolling shutter and post-production will be a lot easier.

As for which kit to buy, I myself would get the body only and a set of prime lenses. We're talking cinema, where image quality is more important than convenience. I'd get 3-4 prime lenses: 50mm for sure (the main lens), 85mm, 25mm and possibly a 16mm if you like shooting in tight spaces. If you can only afford two lenses, make it the 50 and 25. While hit movies have been made only with 50mm lenses, having a 25 is really important when shooting on-location.

December 12, 2016 at 4:49AM, Edited December 12, 4:52AM

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People have shot feature films with far less capable cameras than the ones you are looking at, so any of the cameras on your list are good choices. Here are the cameras in your price range that I would check out...

Blackmagic Pocket Cine Camera
- produces a gorgeous looking image
- can shoot RAW footage
- very compact
- eats batteries for breakfast ( 20 minutes of shooting per battery )
- not great for audio
- low resolution lcd display that is hard to see in bright light
- very small sensor with 2.88x crop factor ( requires very short focal length lenses )

Blackmagic Micro Cine Camera
- produces a gorgeous looking image
- can shoot RAW footage
- very compact
- 90 minutes of shooting per battery
- no built-in display so you must use an external monitor
- very small sensor with 2.88x crop factor ( requires very short focal length lenses )

Panasonic G85
- weather-proof body ( shoot in rain or snow )
- shoots 4K and 1080 footage
- has Cine-D profile mode ( wider contrast range than normal shooting modes )
- built-in 5-axis stabilizer ( also dual-stabilizer mode with the right lens )
- battery lasts 90 minutes
- bright and detailed EVF ( works well in bright light )
- microphone input

Panasonic GX85
- very compact body
- shoots 4K and 1080 footage
- built-in 5-axis stabilizer ( also dual-stabilizer mode with the right lens )

Sony A6300
- weather-proof body ( shoot in rain or snow )
- shoots 4K and 1080 footage
- has log image profiles ( 13+ stops of dynamic range )
- APS-C sensor ( larger and better in low-light )
- battery lasts 60+ minutes
- bright and detailed EVF ( works well in bright light )
- optional XLR mic input accessory

To get a better idea about the image each of these cameras produces I would check out the camera groups on Vimeo to see what videos people have made with them. The Panasonic G85 is brand new so you won't find much on Vimeo, but you can assume that it can do anything the GX85 camera can.

I am a big fan of both 4K and 5-axis image stabilization. 4K gives you a lot more options in post and the stabilization produces a very smooth hand-held image. You can always turn these features off if you want to see what it's like to shoot without them, but they are very handy to have when you need them.

December 12, 2016 at 7:09AM

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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
31831

Very Objective Response.. Always look forward to your responses.. You said a lot of what i would.

Wentworth Kelly

December 14, 2016 at 4:37PM

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