August 12, 2016 at 11:14PM

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Does picture profile (i.e S-Log 2) matter for shooting indoors?

Hey all,
I'm fairly new to colour grading, and only recently picked up LUTs and such. The Sony A7r ii I currently use has picture profile options, of which I assume I use the input LUT colour correction tools in Premiere Pro CC for. I've been doing test shots using profiles such as S-Log 2, but don't fully understand the uses of these profiles, or if I should use them at all.

My question is: what is the purpose of these picture profiles, and if I am shooting a promotional video indoors for a client, how can these profiles and LUTs affect the video.

Many thanks!

4 Comments

The purpose of a picture profile is to make it easier to grade in post-production, furthermore most LUTs are designed for a specific picture profile (E.g. S-log2, S-log3), so you have to be careful which LUTs you get since they will look horrible if they are designed for a different camera/picture profile.

LUTs and Colour grading is a must, it helps to add style, theme and mood to your film. (Even for corporate) Finally it doesn't matter where you're filming if you use a picture profile then should continue using it for the rest of the filming, if you don't then things will get messy I.e colour of shots etc.

Here is a great video on Colour Grading.
https://vimeo.com/116019668

August 13, 2016 at 3:56AM

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Toby Garside
Writer, Director, Director of Photography, Indie Filmmaker
293

>> "LUTs and Colour grading is a must, it helps to add style, theme and mood to your film. (Even for corporate)"

Nonsense!
It is a choice, not a must.

Some color grading can be useful but nowadays I see many films where LUTs are applied indiscriminately to result in absurd and unnatural colors, at least in my opinion.

http://www.doblu.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/bigbang10201.jpg

August 13, 2016 at 9:17AM, Edited August 13, 9:37AM

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Cary Knoop
Member
2000

1) Every professional film has some form of Colour grading.
2) If the movie has a bad colour grading then they probably had a bad colourist, or they were aiming for that style. Just because some films have bad colour doesn't mean they all are.
3) If you don't colour grade then you're missing out on one of the best ways to easily portray emotions.

All in all I believe Colour grading is worth the time.

August 13, 2016 at 3:04PM

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Toby Garside
Writer, Director, Director of Photography, Indie Filmmaker
293

If you're not sure how to use it, don't use s-log until you are comfortable with it. If used incorrectly, you can really set yourself up for failure—especially since the a7s/r cameras offer very little to help you shoot log well.

In my experience, if you're shooting with an a7s/r camera indoors, you're better off with one of the Cine profiles. If you have a high dynamic range scene, s-log can be really helpful—the rest of the time, it's not buying you much.

When I shoot s-log indoors, it's almost always overkill and I end up having to work to get it to a look I could have had in-camera before grading.

xdcam-user is a great resource for learning more about the picture profile options on the Sony cameras.

August 17, 2016 at 1:48PM

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David S.
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