October 22, 2014 at 11:40PM

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Film on 60 fps, then convert to 24fps in Post? or film directly on 24fps?

This has been a doubt for me lately, I don't like the 60fps look, and I doubt people shooting a short film would use it, so, what's the use of it then? I know it's used for slow motion shots sometimes, so, my question is: Film on 60 fps, then convert to 24fps in Post? or film directly on 24fps?

-Thanks!

15 Comments

Depends what do you want. IF is a fiction movie, and in the final release will be 24 and don't want a slow motion, pick 24 from the start. Less cost in capacity of memories, hard drives, speed computer. Other think is if you want make slow motion. I will try only pick more the 24 if you wanna use the extra fps.

October 23, 2014 at 3:46AM

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Ragüel Cremades
Film producer and director
7785

If your end goal is to have 24fps footage, then I would shoot at 24fps. ( 60fps conformed to 24fps at normal speed is going to be a kludge as frames are either going to be thrown out or morphed into new frames that didn't exist when you shot, and your shutter speed can never be lower than 1/60th of a second, instead of the normal 1/48th of a second )

October 23, 2014 at 11:46AM

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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
31588

Thanks!

Tommy Plesky

October 25, 2014 at 2:22AM

Yup, what Guy said. Shoot in the frame rate you want to export in. You don’t want to be throwing out and morphing frames. Reserve 60fps for if you want to slow down some footage.

October 24, 2014 at 4:55AM

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Ryan Toyota
Graphic Designer / Typographer / Video Editor
1143

If you're shooting a short video for something sports-related (softball skills video, football practice, etc), then you'll want a high shutter speed anyways to capture the action. In that case, shoot at 60fps so you can operate in a 24 fps timeline with the optional slomo shots.

October 26, 2014 at 3:19AM

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How about 30 FPS to 24. I've found that 30 FPS helps eliminate most of the "jutter" when panning. It's amazing that we are so locked into 24 FPS when almost all media is digital including an increasing number of theaters. The argument about achieving the "film look" is confusing to me. Depth of field, low contrast and a slow shutter speed are all that is needed. At 60 FPS 1/60th of a sec. is going to give a slight motion blur.

October 27, 2014 at 6:34AM, Edited October 27, 6:34AM

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Jerry Roe
Indie filmmaker
1019

I shoot 30fps for projects that are going to be delivered via the web, which is about 3/4 of the work I do now.

Guy McLoughlin

October 27, 2014 at 4:58PM

Late in the game here.. But there seems to be some confusion. 60fps should be shot using 1/120th if you want to get the natural 'film look'. The rule of thumb is double the frame rate.

1/60th is just the minimum shutter speed for 60fps that a camera will let you select. It might be too blurry at that setting.

Rupert S

September 30, 2015 at 8:37AM

"Depth of field, low contrast and a slow shutter speed are all that is needed"
No, you're missing the cadence that 24 fps provides. I used to be in the same camp as you, but I've since learned there is a stark difference between 24 and 30.

Chris Tempel

November 21, 2016 at 12:43PM

yes you should have an idea of how to context you are shooting will be used in the end. if there is even a remote possibility of using the slow mo then shoot high speed

October 27, 2014 at 3:39PM, Edited October 27, 3:39PM

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Kazu Okuda
Filmmaker
1438

If the job requires VFX it can be better to shoot in high speed just to reduce the motion blur and get more frames to work with even if the scene isn't supposed to be overcranked. Some jobs with sync sound will still require you to shoot higher than 24 if there is extensive VFX.

November 12, 2014 at 6:49PM

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Minh Bui
Editor
13

If the job requires VFX it can be better to shoot in high speed just to reduce the motion blur and get more frames to work with even if the scene isn't supposed to be overcranked. Some jobs with sync sound will still require you to shoot higher than 24 if there is extensive VFX.

November 12, 2014 at 6:49PM

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Minh Bui
Editor
13

Probably a bit late in the day but a lot of searches on this topic lead here.

I don't agree with anything I've read here.

If you have 60p or 60i or 59.94 fps or 59.94i or 50i or 50p or 30p there is only really a couple of ways to convert to 24fps successfully and create a reasonable approximation of film look.

With interlaced footage you deinterlace it to turn it into progressive frames , with 60i for example you can do it a number of ways and end up with either 30p or 60p depending on the deinterlace type. You then feed the progressive footage through a vector based (oprtical flow) based retimer and it will reinterpolate the entire sequence to your desired timebase.

Some will also allow you to add intraframe motionblur , for example a 60fps sequence is going to be exposed for 60/shutter speed . What you need to approximate a film look is 1/48th exposure time per frame, you need to add enough motionblur to compensate. For example if you shot at 120th sec at 60fps you would need to add the equivalent motionblur per frame of 1/48th exposure time to the interpolated 24fps.

To be honest 120th would give so little motionblur at 60fps that you may as well specify a full 180 degree shutter angle type motionblur for 24fps interpolation.

Packages which will allow this are Kronos/Furnace ( Foundry) and Twixtor and the Oflow tools that come in Nuke.

The process will leave artifacts , how noticable they are depends on how well you tune the interpolation , the activity in the footage and how well you do any resulting cleanup of the artifacts.

And the comment on VFX preferring higher speed is only relevant for a few given situatons such as technical plate shoots . Do not prioritise your shooting speed just for VFX , they can cope with everything just fine.

June 23, 2016 at 8:44AM, Edited June 23, 8:50AM

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I agree that one should shoot at their target frame rate most of the time. However, a lot of CMOS cameras have less rolling shutter artifact at 60 than 24 (less than half). So, if you have a lot of fast camera movement, it might actually be better to shoot at 60FPS, interpolate (morph new frames in between) to 120FPS and down convert to 24FPS. I discovered this on accident in a multi-cam shoot where three cameras ran at 24FPS but one was mistakenly set for 60. It took a LONG TIME to rerender the video (using AVI Synth) and the interpolation isn't perfect, but camera movement wasn't as nauseating.

October 24, 2016 at 7:34AM

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You should shoot as maximum fps as your camera can , so you can slow down some scenes where needed ( in post ) , and export whole movie in 24 fps , that's how i do it :)

November 19, 2016 at 1:59AM

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Arsh DSJ
Director Editor Producer
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