June 4, 2015 at 7:50PM

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Shooting and Editing 60 fps vs 24 fps

I am going to a music festival and want to shoot a video while I am there. The end result will be in 24 fps, however, I want to be able to use some shots as slow motion or speed ramping effects. If I were to shoot the entire festival in 60fps 120 shutter, what would the footage look like when I put it in the 24 fps timeline then sped it up for play back at normal speed (200-250% I believe?)

Am I better off only shooting some shots in slomo?

10 Comments

The problem using 60 is not just that... you will have a lot darker the image. If is in the night I don't recommend you use 60.

June 4, 2015 at 9:02PM

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Ragüel Cremades
Film producer and director
7569

it will be shot mostly during the day, but yeah I get that the shutter will be a lot higher for the 60 fps. How will it affect the editing process though?

June 5, 2015 at 9:01AM

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You're better off using 24p for the stuff you want at regular speed and 60 for slow motion. Depending on how you compress it, you might get some weird frame interpolation stuff going on. 24p looks better in a 24p timeline. Good luck!

June 5, 2015 at 11:37AM

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Avery Maycock
Writer, Director
164

60 fps footage in a 24 fps timeline (but not slowed down) tends to look a little funky in my experience. For one thing there can be some stuttering/strangeness on big, fluid motions because of the inherent limitations of a method that involves chopping out frames. For another, the shutter is slightly fast which changes the look of the motion blur at full speed. You can use a (not free) plugin called Reelsmart Motion Blur (RSMB) to restore the motion blur and it generally works pretty well. In general, though, you'd almost surely be better off shooting only the clips you want to be slow-mo in 60p if that's possible.

June 6, 2015 at 4:05PM

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Philip Heinrich
Director, Producer
926

As Philip mentioned the best way to go is to shoot the stuff you want in slow motion at 60 fps, and the rest in 24 since the motion blur won't match when converting down. Although, it is fully possible to get good results using tools such as the one Philip suggested to add motion blur in post. Most professional editing softwares today have one of these.

June 7, 2015 at 6:49AM

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Tobias N
1022

Good advice above and it's certainly important to experiment with this stuff and understand the impact on your shots.

However, it could be that you want to stray from the traditional frame rate and motion blur 'look'? I've had fun shooting at very high shutter speeds or messing with things on the timeline. It isn't 'correct' but often produces interesting results and, since there are gazillions of music videos out there, perhaps an unusual approach to shooting would help make yours a little different?

June 8, 2015 at 4:13AM

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I really don't have an exact idea for what I want the footage to look like. This is the kind of thing I will just get to the festival and see whats happening and shoot what I see. I know I will want some slow motion footage, but have a hard time deciding if I should shoot something slow vs regular speed. I also really like time ramping effects and think that would be a cool effect when I cut the video to music.

Pretty much I need to watch other successful aftermovies and see what they do to be successful.

June 8, 2015 at 11:37AM

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I would shoot the things you want in slomo in 60 p in adobe you can interpret footage at 24 fps and you have a real slomo more than half the speed. In daylight you lose a stop or of light which isn't bad at al.
I shot recently 50 fps in cinema tools batch conformed it to 25 fps and edited in fcp7 looks great.

June 9, 2015 at 9:59AM

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50 fps converting to 25 fps is ideal, because it works out to be chopping out every other frame. This avoids the stuttering motion issues that sometimes arise when changing 60 fps to 24 fps.

June 11, 2015 at 5:00AM

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Philip Heinrich
Director, Producer
926

I love 24p. I always shoot 24p no matter the project. Make sure you understand the post workflow with what ever frame rate you choose. Check this out: How a Post Production Supervisor Can Save Your Butt! - http://bit.ly/1TNL6XE

December 15, 2015 at 12:18PM

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Alex Ferrari
Director / Producer
863

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