April 28, 2015 at 4:37AM

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should I Shoot myself?!

Hi everybody,
I have just finished writing the script for my short film and the pre-production is almost done.
I have made some shorts before, and most of the time I myself shoot and edit my own films.

this time a friend suggested me if she can do the camera work for my short. but I am a bit reluctant! I like it to shoot my own films and that is because when I write I have a clear vision of the film and during the shooting I go for that vision!
besides, I like the credit to be the cinematographer too :D

is this the time that I let it go and trust some one else to do it ?!

14 Comments

Filmmaking is all about working with other people as a team. Don't let your ego get in the way, so have your friend do the camera work.

April 28, 2015 at 8:15AM

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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
32734

I agree with Guy, it's meant to collaborative.
Even find an editor for the project, get a whole team, it's a very different experience than wearing all the hats. You even may enjoy the smaller workload

April 28, 2015 at 10:32AM

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Greg
Editor / Assistant Editor
148

I agree with the statements made by the folks above. If you are to direct the film, spend more time communicating your ideas to your team, and get them excited about it! If you can get your team to love your ideas then they will work synergistically and maybe come up with things that are better than the original idea! Not saying you don't have a good idea to start, but film is collaborative. There's no way around that.

April 28, 2015 at 3:46PM, Edited April 28, 3:45PM

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Grace Pisula
Director of Photography
93

You guys are right. The more I think about it, the more I see that it is better to see the big picture which lays in the team work. fingers crossed!

April 28, 2015 at 3:46PM

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Aslan
Director
157

You can still have great input on how the shots should be composed and look. You can certainly be behind the monitor and make sure it is how you want it to look, but it's always nice to have a second (or third, or fourth!) set of eyes on things to potentially give you ideas you wouldn't have had before, or find new ways to do something.

Ben Meredith

April 28, 2015 at 5:20PM

yup, thank you. I see the point : )

April 29, 2015 at 4:36AM, Edited April 29, 4:36AM

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Aslan
Director
157

I advise you to never shoot yourself, that usually kills the man.

Jokes aside, I can encourage you to try the non-shooting director's hat at least once. I love to shoot and have influence on the camerawork. But working with a DoP or camerateam often results in even nicer results! And your actor value the time with the director when setting up shots. This way they can be instructed better.

April 29, 2015 at 1:13PM

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Kasper Mols
Writer/Director
1

Well, I'm going to disagree with the above comments. If you have a clear vision, shoot it yourself. IMO, it's never really "YOUR" film unless you're doing the "big-three"... directing, DP, and editor.

Just remember when taking advice... people who work as DP's are ALWAYS going to tell you to hire a DP... because that means money and work for them. But the future really is directors shooting their own material as everything becomes easier with technology. Embrace the change. Learn to be self-sufficient in as many areas as possible!

April 29, 2015 at 3:41PM, Edited April 29, 3:45PM

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wow, this is a bit radical now ! I had the same mindset toward film making, regarding that I am an independent filmmaker. but I think as a director you must have the ability to lead a larger group, a team. My long time vision is to finally direct feature films and there would be much larger number of people to deal with.

so, although I love cinematography as well, I think some times sharing the part would be a good practice of communicating with the team.

Aslan

April 29, 2015 at 4:19PM

Chet may think DP's only want 'more money and work' (Although, don't we all?), but the truth is we more than anyone else know how much work goes into it. If you as a director is afraid of losing control of the image by hiring a DP, there is an even simpler solution than doing the work yourself: Work on your directing skills.
Directing is all about having that vision and knowing how to direct people towards it. If you have to do everything yourself in order to get your vision across, you may be a good filmmaker, but you're not a good director.

Tobias N

May 1, 2015 at 5:13PM

wow, this is a bit radical now ! I had the same mindset toward film making, regarding that I am an independent filmmaker. but I think as a director you must have the ability to lead a larger group, a team. My long time vision is to finally direct feature films and there would be much larger number of people to deal with.
so, although I love cinematography as well, I think some times sharing the part would be a good practice of communicating with the team.

April 29, 2015 at 4:24PM

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Aslan
Director
157

This is something i've struggled with a lot, and actually ended up being a cinematographer. I think it kinda falls under the "learn the rules before you break them" mentality, which i'm a big proponent of. Learn how to work on set, collaborating with the rest of your crew and conveying your ideas, and it will make you a much better filmmaker.
Then after you continually do that, you can sometimes go back to directing and DPing your film with all the more experience (Like Reed Morano with her film Meadowlands)

April 29, 2015 at 8:06PM, Edited April 29, 8:06PM

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Derek Mindler
Cinematographer
246

@Tobias Nilsson, that's a good point. I agree that there exists a difference between a good director and a good filmmaker. Well said, thank you : )

May 3, 2015 at 6:56AM, Edited May 3, 6:58AM

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Aslan
Director
157

I think learning to collaborate is a great idea. However, there are people such as Steven Soderbergh who are the director, cinematographer, and editor of their films (although he uses pseudonyms for editor and dp). I think it all depends on where your passion is.

February 22, 2016 at 2:09PM, Edited February 22, 2:09PM

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David Summers
VFX Supervisor/Artist and Filmmaker
282

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