September 9, 2014 at 4:16PM

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Sony a7s lens mount choice - E to E or F to E with adapter for greater future camera versatility.

Having a Pre-buying concern.

Considering the new Sony a7s camera for video and the new Rokinon DS Cine lenses. I'd like to avoid any adapter issues and have a choice of lens mounts for Rokinon lenses. I could buy the E mount and have a secure "proper" fit, but that apparently locks me into Sony (for life) only with the lenses. I may want to use the lenses on second camera or possibly switch brands in the future (though currently have only 1 full rig set up for a single camera now). For reasons I imagine are mechanical there are no E mount lens adapters to F mount (for instance).

I could go with the Rokinon F mount, use an F to E mount adapter and secure future options, but my gut tells me a straight E to E mount would insure no lens wiggle and "better" performance. It would be my first Sony camera so my brain is screaming "don't get lenses that lock me into only one brand of camera".

Can anyone please offer some insight into this delima?

4 Comments

Haven't used it with the A7 - but when I was shooting with the FS700 (also E mount) I used the Novoflex Nikon to Sony adapter. Its a "dumb" adapter, meaning no autofocus but if you're using Cine lenses its not an issue obviously. It also has a "declicking" feature, meaning if you use manual lenses that are non-cine it gives the ability to do smooth aperture adjustments. It was rock solid, no lens movement at all. You can buy the cheap small adapters and you will have nothing but headaches with them. You're best bet is to really look at what other kinds of lenses you might want to purchase down the line and go that route. I own Nikon lenses so it made sense for me - and Nikon has never changed their mount ever, so I can use any lens ever made - whereas Canon has their newer EF mount, and their older glass is a different mount.

Think about what your future might hold but also remember that if down the line you are able to buy big expensive glass- then chances are if you need to buy a new adapter, you'll probably be ok!

http://www.adorama.com/NVNEXNIK.html?cvosrc=cse.google.NVNEXNIK&cvo_cid=...

September 9, 2014 at 5:56PM

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Scott Selman
Content Creator | Filmmaker | Producer
1035

Thank you. I have the Novaflex adapter set as my choice if I go F mount. I shoot stills with Nikon and know down the road I may be using a Nikon for a B video camera (who knows with tech upgrades - maybe A?). I'd hate to be stuck with a lens that can't adapt. Great to hear about the solid mount with that adapter. Down the road I'd like see about getting Zeiss ZF.2 glass, but for now spent quite a bit on computer work station, lights, audio, rig, on camera monitor and next big bite of starter camera and Cine lenses. Not to mention the (if it is tested to be as advertised) the Atomos Shogun. No wonder a friend of mine in the industry laughed when I told him I was going to buy the gear for film making. Of couse he said just rent gear, but I want to learn and produce work on my (non rented) time and own gear. That was my approach to my now professional photography business and it has served me well.

September 9, 2014 at 6:23PM

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Mark Mecalis
Beginning Film Maker
28

With you 100% - I also own the Rokinon 85mm Cine and I really think they are solid lenses. My DP owns the 35 and we used them with all of my Nikon glass on my last piece- shot on the Blackmagic Production 4k - and all of the lenses worked really well together, and the quality held up really well on the 4k sensor.

September 9, 2014 at 6:36PM

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Scott Selman
Content Creator | Filmmaker | Producer
1035

Check this out:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flange_focal_distance

It basically tells you the distance from the front of the mount to the sensor.

If you're moving a lens from a longer one to a shorter one, then it is usually possible to make an adapter. The reverse however would generally be a physical impossibility. This is a big benefit of mirrorless cameras, as they lack the mirror DSLRs have, their mounts are much more shallow which gives you a wider range of lenses which can be adapted to them.

This is a reason why I prefer Nikon F mount, because I feel it is hard to predict into the future what camera I might get next (be it Panasonic, Nikon, Sony, Canon, Blackmagic, who knows....) and lenses can last many many years longer than a camera will. Nikon F mount gives me the maximum options open for the future, while it is also a very popular mount that has been production the longest out of all the stills mounts so there is more lenses made for Nikon F mount than anything else. Thus many affordable vintage lenses can be picked up for a bargain! Great if you're on a frugal budget like myself.

However I can also see some value in having a few native mount lenses occasionally for certain purposes. Thus the bulk of my lens collection is primarily built around the Nikon F mount (only some are actually Nikon branded however, I've got ones from Tokina, Tamron, Sigma, Vivitar, etc) but will be supplemented with just a few Micro Four Thirds lenses too (and if I ever get a Sony E mount camera one day, which I might, then I'll probably get one or three E mount lenses too).

September 10, 2014 at 5:51AM

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David Peterson
Wedding Cinematographer
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