» Posts Tagged ‘amazonvod’

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vimeo-logoEveryone and their mother is getting in on the VOD game, and for some time, Vimeo has been positioning itself as a way for indie filmmakers to get their content to viewers and see a profit; they’ve just introduced new bells and whistles for filmmakers and content creators, including several new features for their PRO users who distribute content using the service, including a revamped dashboard and more in-depth metrics to help creators see where their work is selling. Check it out and see what Vimeo’s VOD could do for you and your film. More »

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bufferingStreaming video is a sort of bellwether for the health of your internet connection; after all, it uses arguably the most day-to-day horsepower of the information super parkway, and has become, in the past few years, ubiquitous. Streaming capabilities have become an accurate measure of the efficacy of any ISP, but finding out how each stacked up was a challenge. Last year, Google rolled out its inaugural Video Quality Report, which looked at streaming speeds in Canada. Now, as of today, it’s the U.S.’s turn, and the results are interesting, to say the least. After the jump, see where your ISP stacks up. More »

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It’s clear that industry leaders in web-based media are taking original content very seriously — even Netflix, traditionally a home to separately created content, has rolled up its sleeves and proactively produced its own series. Now, another VOD/rental giant has decided to personally fund and cultivate original media — Amazon Studios has just announced its Instant Video component will be the home to six upcoming comedy pilots. The pilots will be helmed by everything from Emmy-winners and to up-and-comers — perhaps most importantly, they will be free to watch by anyone on Amazon Instant Video, and it will be viewer feedback that determines which of the series are greenlit and permitted to move forward. More »

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For its future as a streaming only service, Netflix is reliant on deals with content owners, a situation which has the service being described aptly as a castle on quicksand. As evidence of its constantly-changing library, Netflix recently lost Starz content but today added Dreamworks Animation films to their library. However, Amazon also doubled their Prime library today (which at $79/year — including an unlimited free two-day shipping tie-in — compares favorably to Netflix’s $96 annual fee). Competition is heating up, but I can’t help but note one other thing about Netflix: the design of their website and most of their apps is, and always has been, mediocre at best. Which is to say nothing of the connection between the service’s benefit to consumers and its detriment to content creators. More »