» Posts Tagged ‘android’

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BitTorrent Bundles Download within ClientThe alpha publishing project BitTorrent Bundles is catching on as a diverse tool for the distribution of content directly to fans. BitTorrent has announced a new Android app and an update to two of their software clients, uTorrent and BitTorrent. The update will make Bundles available to download directly from inside the clients. What does this mean for filmmakers? Read on for more details. More »

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TP Link TL MR3040If you’re unwilling to shell out a fistful of hundred-dollar bills for a wireless monitor, you might want to get your hands on a TP-Link TL-MR3040 wireless router. By installing alternate firmware on this little guy, you can turn it into a Wi-Fi dongle that you can then connect to your Canon or Nikon camera to turn your Android phone or tablet into a wireless monitor/controller for only $30. Check out the following tutorials to get step-by-step instructions on how to turn your Android device into a wireless monitor/controller. More »

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google remind me functionalityYou know how you covertly check the website of that cheesy sci-fi series or British sitcom-with-laughtrack you love, but can’t admit you watch, to check for new episodes while nobody’s looking? Now, you can actually have Google send you a reminder to your Android or iOS device when there’s something new to watch with the “Remind Me” feature in Google Now. At the end of August, Google Operating System noticed the update, and after a few weeks of limited availability and functionality, the feature is now live for many of you to try! More »

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vineWhen Vine, Twitter’s video-sharing app, was introduced earlier this year, it was expected to be a simple add-on to Twitter, i.e., a way to share short videos as supplements to tweets (“Hey guyz, check me out at the grocery store. :) lol #justinbieber”). The app, which allows for 6 seconds of looping video and no retakes or editing beyond internal jump cuts, took off, and filmmakers like David Lynch and Adam Goldberg made art and comedy out of the app’s inherent limitations. On Monday night, your humble correspondent went to the Upper East Side of Manhattan to meet with Vine master Kyle Williams (aka Keelayjams) and learned some of his secrets. Click below to learn how Kyle makes his Vines, and some tricks to put Vine to use for you as an indie filmmaker. More »

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Screen Shot 2013-05-29 at 2.08.18 PMWhen it comes to screenwriting software, there’s Final Draft – and then there’s everything else. Or, at least, this was the situation for years. I can remember being a teenager (many years ago), getting a copy of Final Draft for Christmas, and being really excited that I wouldn’t have to hand-set all the margins and pagination in Word anymore, which everyone knows is excruciatingly annoying. These days, there are plenty of new options, including Fade In, an application that gives Final Draft a run for its money (literally). Click below to check out a review and get a breakdown of the features! More »

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Though I understand where these things come from, calling something like Lomography “the analog Instagram” is like calling Kodak’s new Super 8 stock “the chemical MiniDV,” or even better, “the new digital from back before digital” — for the sake of modern analog (dear lord I just said that) we’re getting our chicken-and-egg orders mixed up. That said, we’ve seen some pretty interesting blends of the old and the new… and then back to the old again. There was The Impossible Project’s Impossible Instant Lab, which made Polaroids of cell phone stills — which we also called “the Real Instagram,” though again, I understand why. Thanks to (both a hobby and) a company called Lomography, the opposite chicken-egg process is possible — with some help, your smartphone is now also a digital scanner of film negatives. Read: Instant scanning, insta… sharing. More »

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Yesterday, Google announced that YouTube was coming to your real tube in a big new way, by way of your Android device and WiFi. Today, RCA has reported something similar, but the opposite — sort of — perhaps looking to get in on today’s lucrative tablet market. Interestingly, in this case, the company has announced an Android tablet that will be capable of wirelessly receiving television channels, for free — but not via WiFi internet access. The device will tap the airwaves in much the same way the ‘bunny ears’ of your parents’ old cable-less TV set did back in the ’50s, but allow you to do so while traveling, up to 100 miles per hour. More »

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YouTube is doing a lot to make itself a media service platform that rivals the traditional television you’re used to. Original channels are getting a major push, creators are being given some big perks as incentive, and shooting/uploading elegance now trumps native video-sharing options on rival mobile devices. There’s still plenty of things that need to be ironed out before all of us may seriously consider YouTube as a hub for our own content — but Google is still looking toward the future and forging ahead. The ability to watch YouTube on your home TV set is already proliferating, but now, Google has announced an app update that allows you to control browsing and viewing directly with your Android phone or tablet. More »

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I wasn’t really expecting to have to refer to the theoretical ‘Instagram of Video’ for another while — major choices for mobile users are already in place and ‘in the running’ for such a title, and it could be a while before everyone in the discussion unanimously declares one app the victor (if ever). The Verge (seemingly in a nod to comments) acknowledged YouTube as the elephant in the room for these apps, because even on iOS where the YouTube app is read-only (well, watch-only — no uploads), the service is the megalith for easily-socialized video. A complete YouTube experience is already native on Android (again, YouTube is Google is Android), perhaps to the chagrin of recent Android-joiner Viddy. A new development may totally shift the dynamics of this interplay, however: Google just yesterday released YouTube Capture for iOS. More »

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Where is the supposed ‘Instagram of Video?’ Is it even possible for a motion-based media/social service to be as lightweight, sharable, and just plain easy as Instagram makes stills? The jury is still out, the verdict on which of the contenders will stick — if any at all — is still to be determined. We covered a bit on some of the startups stepping into the ring already, and since then, some other relevant material has surfaced. In one corner, heavyweight Viddy (one of the favorite bets) has just released an Android version of its service for many smartphones, while in the other, small independent startup Lumify wants to make “filmmaking for everyone” and attempts to answer “Why our mobile videos suck.” More »

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There’s no doubt that modern mobile technology has the capacity to streamline or benefit many aspects of filmmaking. Whether it’s the micro-video art emerging in social media, script supervision capabilities, lighting-fast previsualization softwares, or the surprisingly high-resolution video some phones and tablets can shoot (given what they are), there’s something to be said for their place in the industry. For goodness sake, modern smartphones are better at giving directions than my GPS navigator and shoot higher quality video than my first camcorder. With all that said, though, how far can things like the Apple iPhone or an Android tablet be taken down-and-dirty in the trenches of shooting? More »

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There are many great ways to connect to other filmmakers today. We have sites like Production Hub, Mandy.com, and even Craigslist that are fantastic for crewing up and getting on crews. However, when I’m playing “closer to the chest”, I find myself sourcing locally nowadays on Facebook. I like to see who knows who of closer friends, and I prefer direct connections to general callouts. This merger of production resources and social networking is the theme behind Stage 32, a 70,000+ member network for film, television, and theatre creatives. More »

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Thanks to Hollywood Camera Work’s new app Shot Designer, you can now design and block camera coverage of your scene almost as fast as you can think it — even on your mobile device. An intuitive interface allows precise control for plotting (and animating) all the essential aspects of shooting your scene in a classic top-down diagram style. A limited (single-scene-at-a-time) release is available for free, and the $20 Pro version has some key perks too. Read on for the intro video and a more detailed list of Shot Designer’s features. More »

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This is a guest post by Whitney Adams.

There are literally thousands of apps on the iOS and Android platforms, and plenty of them are actually useful for filmmakers. Having some of these apps is like having an entire production office or studio in your pocket. App developers have created tools for all different skill levels, so whether you are just starting your career or have been at it for a while, there is an app for you. Here are 5 that just might make your filmmaking experience more productive: More »

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Augmented Reality has been slowly making its way into our lives, mostly in the form of demo videos, games, and Google’s forthcoming Glass project. But Aurasma is a cool little app that puts the tools to create AR content into the hands of everyone, and has implications that could put an interesting twist in filmmaking for the web: More »

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A couple of weeks ago I wrote about The Kick camera light and what it’s features could mean for the future of studio lighting, one of which was the possibility of controlling the attributes of multiple lights from a smart phone . While this is a feature that hasn’t yet come to pass for studio lights, it is starting to appear in practicals: More »

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Vimeo has always been a huge supporter of artists, musicians, filmmakers – anyone in the arts. They’ve fostered a community that lets artists be who they want to be, and post their work without restrictions, something that’s a bit harder to find on YouTube. Today they updated their iOS app, and like most of their website, it’s still free. The big news, however, is that it finally works natively on those millions of iPads you creatives have been carrying around. More »

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When I originally wrote, “Google TV is what independent filmmakers have been waiting for,” in retrospect I forgot the “is” at the beginning of the sentence and the question mark at the end. So far the answer to that question has been, admittedly and unfortunately, a resounding “no” — so much so that, despite being sent a Google TV by Google (in part because of writing that article), I still haven’t set it up. But when it comes to independent film distribution, the TV is the final frontier, and whether or not Google TV version 1 made an impact, version 2 is currently rolling out this week and looks to improve things significantly. Oh, and rumors are flying that Apple is apparently getting into the TV game for real (the current Apple TV is nothing more than a hobby). More »

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If Google and Apple were politicians — and if this blog were actually a legitimate news site — I’d have to give each of them equal time. So, since I mentioned the improved video and photo capabilities of the iPhone 4S, I would be remiss if I did not also mention Google’s demonstration of Android 4.0 “Ice Cream Sandwich” last week, which, to contextualize things, will make most mobile phones higher resolution and more feature-laden for shooting video video than the first digital video camera I used a dozen years ago (which retailed for $3,500 at the time). And if you think this doesn’t relate to filmmaking at all, it turns out DP Seamus McGarvey used an iPhone to shoot parts of The Avengers — actually this has since been debunked, but the Android headline still stands: More »

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At the same MAX conference where they announced Creative Cloud, Adobe also demonstrated not one but six new touch apps for tablet interfaces. These $9.99 programs, along with a $60/year Carousel photo storage/sharing service, include “anytime, anywhere” apps that allow for image editing, sketching, “ideation,” mood boards, website/mobile prototyping, and presenting finished work. The apps — which do not include a video editing solution (yet), will be available on Android starting in November. As for iOS and their sometimes bristly relationship with Apple, Adobe “expects to make an announcement regarding iOS availability in early 2012.” Here are video demos of each touch app in action: More »