» Posts Tagged ‘art’

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CropperCapture[77]There are many jobs in the filmmaking process. It all starts with a script, a story waiting to be told. Then there’s the director, the visionary, the person with the plan. But we all know that filmmaking is highly collaborative, so a team begins to emerge, with a group of like-minded artists all striving towards the same goal. You’ve got your art directors and production designers, and new worlds are created. You’ve got your editors, who lovingly craft the footage into the final piece of art. You’ve got your makeup artists and VFX artists and loads of other craftspeople who ultimately shape the film in some unique way. And then there’s the cinematographer, the person behind the lens. But what exactly does a cinematographer do, and what does it mean to be a cinematographer? The following short video from the EFTI School of Cinematography in Spain has the answer. More »

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Film Meets Art Christopher NolanFilmmakers draw their inspiration from absolutely everywhere — every experience they’ve had, place they’ve been, song they’ve heard. For some, obscure historical events triggers their creativity, while for others, it could be a simple photograph — the title character from Wes Anderson’s Rushmore, Max Fischer, was inspired by a photo by Jacques Henri Lartigue. The Tate Gallery in London has launched a fascinating series of videos entitled “Film meets Art” that asks prominent U.K. directors about which works of art from famous painters have inspired their films. More »

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Christopher DoyleHere at NFS we’ve shared plenty of Christopher Doyle’s enlightening advice, as well as a cinematography masterclass from the legendary Hong Kong DP. At this point, it’s pretty safe to say that Doyle is one of my absolute favorite cinematographers. Maybe it’s his fabulous hair style, or his unique sense of camera movement and light. Mostly though, it’s due to the fact that he is one of the few cinematographers working in narrative features today who is a legitimate artist in every sense of the word. He uses cinematography as a vehicle to express his singularly fascinating worldview, which is one of the things that sets him apart from the crowd. Now we’ve got a fantastic piece of insight into Doyle’s unique artistic process in the form of an interview from thefilmbook. Check it out below. More »

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WonderlandMaking a sustainable and comfortable living from the art that we create — that seems to be the goal many of us, the light at the end of the tunnel. But is that really possible — to spend our days doing what we love and being creatively satisfied by it, all the while getting paid? The fine folks over at Eskimo, a multidisciplinary design and production studio, have crafted a documentary that seeks to expound on these questions through interviews with some of today’s leading creative professionals. Check out the full documentary below: More »

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John Hawkes is one of those actors who slides under most people’s radar, even though he somehow manages to be in just about everything. I first became aware of his acting prowess with his eerie portrayal of a cult leader in Sean Durkin’s haunting character study, Martha Marcy May Marlene. Since then, I’ve noticed him in about a gazillion different films (that’s the actual number), and I’ve come to greatly appreciate him as one of a few fantastic character actors working today. He’s even been nominated for an Academy Award for his role as the meth-addled antagonist in the indie hit, Winter’s Bone. Hawkes recently wrote a short piece for MovieMaker Magazine about his seven tips for surviving in the film industry, and needless to say, the seasoned veteran has some fantastic advice for up and coming filmmakers. More »

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PressPausePlay is a feature-length documentary on “hope, fear, and digital culture” that has been making the festival rounds for a while and is now available gratis on the internet. It’s highly recommended viewing at any price — you can buy it for $14.99 on iTunes or rent it for $3.99 on Amazon — but now you can also download it for free (in 1080p, no less) on the PressPausePlay site. There’s also a nifty Adobe AIR interactive version (also free) with interactive hotspots and links to full interviews. Here’s not just one but three relevant trailers: More »