» Posts Tagged ‘canont4i’

Description image

Kevin Good and the Weapons of Mass Production team are on a sleepless mission to determine the best bang for your buck, and weed out all the rest. Each contender will get its due where it excels, but a clear winner will emerge from the settling dust just about every time — and WOMP will suffer no runners-up, all on behalf of the budget shooter. You know this from the show’s 24-70mm lens shootout — you also know how to shoot with an iPhone, or how others measure up to GoPro as action cameras. Now, WOMP sets out to answer the question of questions in today’s camera market: what’s the best you can do for under a thousand dollars? (Runners-up, beware). More »

Description image

As we approach midnight in most places around the world (with some already celebrating the new year), the hardworking team over at Magic Lantern has delivered more updates to the trusty Canon DSLRs. We now have a second alpha for the Canon 7D — a camera that we previously thought was unhackable — and more updates are on their way with support for the Canon T4i, 6D, and 40D. Check out all of the exciting developments below. More »

Description image

It’s very surreal to waltz through my local big-box store and think “Wow, I could make a real movie with that Canon.” It was even more surreal to see some of that same gear in the Black Friday ads. As we’ve seen with the “DSLR Revolution,” the democratization of filmmaking comes from amazing imaging devices becoming accessible (cheap) to the masses. Well, this year the revolution continued, as they say, as there were a lot of filmmaker-relevant deals going on for Black Friday. But what about a roundup of (still ongoing) Cyber Monday deals? Griffin Hammond of Indy Mogul provides a nice video of his “MEGA DEALS” after the bump: More »

Description image

Magic Lantern, the well-known third party firmware solution for Canon DSLRs that we discussed a few weeks ago, has finally released their newest firmware version 2.3 as a free download. Since it takes a tremendous amount of work to put together these firmware updates, they were asking for a donation in exchange for the download, or you could compile the firmware update yourself for free (which isn’t very straightforward). Check out the video below to see some of the great features that have been added in this version. More »

Description image

Recalls and issues with cameras are nothing new, and when you’re producing hundreds of thousands of an item, there is a good chance there will be a problem somewhere down the line. The issue this time is a problem with the Canon T4i and a chemical on the rubber of the hand grips that could turn white over time and also possibly cause skin irritation (though only one case of skin irritation has been reported so far). Canon initially announced the recall for cameras manufactured between May 31st and June 15th, but they have now extended the date to June 27th. The total number of affected cameras is over 68,000 now — which is quite a few more than were initially part of the recall. More »

Description image

Magic Lantern, the hack third party firmware solution for Canon cameras, has come a long, long way since its first release. Stability and new features have been the top priorities for the team, and it looks like with the newest release they are delivering on both counts. Even though Canon has been increasing the feature set of the higher-end cameras like the Canon 5D Mark III and the 1D X, they have been trying to differentiate the video and photo product lines as much as possible. For those familiar with the traditional features of a video camera, using DSLR presents quite a few challenges. The goal of Magic Lantern, however, is to introduce in firmware all of these quirks that make shooting with real video cameras that much easier. More »

Description image

Yes and no. One of the most requested features from Canon for its popular DSLRs is the ability to record the HDMI feed coming out of the camera. Nikon has delivered on this feature request, and the D800 and D4 both deliver a clean HDMI feed without any text that allows you to bypass the internal codec and get a clean 1080p 8-bit 4:2:2 image. The first reviews for the Canon T4i were with pre-production cameras, and some had been reporting that the HDMI was completely clean. This could have been chalked up to beta firmware, but now there are real production cameras in the wild and we have a final verdict on whether or not we can record that signal. More »

Description image

There’s been quite a bit of talk about cameras lately, maybe a little too much, but it has become quite clear that the differences between camera systems are more minimal than they’ve ever been, and it’s possible to get good results from almost any of them. We already looked at the 5D Mark III and the T2i, and it was clear that for web video, the final image quality was very similar. Now comes the Canon T4i, which is an update to the popular T3i/T2i cameras. The video reviews are out, but should you upgrade? More »

Description image

Canon has now officially announced the Canon Rebel T4i (or 650d as it will be known outside of the U.S.). If you’ve read the other posts before the official announcement and were hoping for something additional, you may be waiting for the next Canon camera, as it looks like the earlier specs were accurate. The big features in this update to the T3i are autofocus during video recording, a vari-angle touch screen lcd, and improved low-light sensitivity. Canon is also introducing two new lenses for the T4i, an 18-135mm kit lens and a 40mm pancake, both designed to be silent during video recording. More »

Description image

Autofocus in video mode on the new Canon T4i wouldn’t be all that useful without some lenses designed to handle it. That’s why Canon is introducing a new STM (stepping motor) line of lenses. Not only are they basically silent, but they are more capable of handling the smooth focus transitions that are required for video autofocus as opposed to photo autofocus — which is designed to be fast and accurate at the cost of jerky focus movements. The first two lenses they are introducing will be a replacement to the 18-135mm kit lens, and a 40mm f/2.8 pancake. More »

Description image

The Canon 5D Mark III was arguably one of the most anticipated cameras in Canon’s existence, and while much of that excitement has died down as people go back to their working lives, there are still plenty of new cameras just around the bend. The first, which will be announced tomorrow, is the Canon T4i, or 650D, as it will be known outside of the United States. Canon stuck to its guns on the Mark III so that it wouldn’t upset professionals, but with the T4i, they are introducing a touchscreen, as well as a feature many have asked about – real autofocus during video recording. The full specs and photos are below. More »

Description image

Just as I was writing about the possible new features of Magic Lantern Unified, it’s been confirmed that the replacement for the Canon 5D Mark II will be announced on February 28th. Does this make me any less excited about Magic Lantern? Absolutely not! This next Canon camera will not be for everyone, and there’s a major hurdle for plenty of people: price. Let’s look at the confirmed specs so far.
More »