» Posts Tagged ‘cinemaeos’

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Canon_EOS_CinemaThere has been plenty of talk over the last couple years about Canon and their product strategy as it relates to their Cinema and DSLR cameras. While their cinema cameras — specifically the C300 — have been incredibly popular, there are many who wonder why the company can’t offer better quality internally when very budget-priced cameras from Blackmagic are doing ProRes, DNxHD, and RAW without needing external recorders. At the Inter BEE 2013 conference (Japan’s version of NAB), Dan Chung from Newsshooter sat down with Yoshinari Onda, the global product manager for Canon’s Cinema EOS cameras, to ask some of these questions and also explore the recent AF firmware upgrade for the C100. Check out the fantastic interview below: More »

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Canon 7D HDSLR DSLR VDSLRIf you want to get a truly high quality cinematic image that can hold up on the big screen from Canon (without a ton of post work), there currently aren’t any options under $6,500. While I think the Canon C100 is actually a better deal than one might think at first glance, it’s still well above the price range for many people, especially those who are moving up from cameras like the T2i or T3i — jumping up to almost $7,000 just might not be realistic. There is still a missing camera in Canon’s Cinema EOS line, between $2,000 and $6,500, and there is word it may be coming in a DSLR-type camera. More »

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The camera that seemingly appeared out of nowhere at the end of last month, the Canon C100, looks like it has its first real footage online. While we don’t have an official price yet from the largest American reseller, B&H, it’s looking like the final price may be somewhere between $6,000 and $8,000. In typical Canon style, though, the video is something we’ve got to watch extremely compressed through an online streaming service (in this case Vimeo). The creator of the video, Sebastien Devaud, had a talk with Sebastian over at cinema5D at this year’s IBC about the camera and shooting the video for Canon. There is also a behind-the-scenes of the video that is embedded below. More »

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The lower-cost and somewhat less featured version of the C300, the C100, was not the only announcement from Canon today. We’ve also got a list price and release date for the new 4K shooting C500: $30,000 and October. While the actual price could be lower — much like the higher initial list prices of the C300 and C100 — this camera is more than likely going to be a rental for a lot of people. Canon also announced new EOS Cinema lenses, a 14mm T/3.1 and 135mm T/2.2, and (re)announced two cinema zoom lenses, a 15.5-47mm T2.8 and 30-105mm T2.8. More »

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We all knew it was coming at some point — a Canon EOS Cinema camera under $10,000. Today Canon announced the C100, the cheaper sibling of the C300 (a lot cheaper at half the price). While it looks like this camera should be able to go head to head with the FS700 (considering the price), it’s actually an FS100 for $3,000 more and with a less compatible mount. Either way it’s just another option for filmmakers to consider when choosing their next camera. Check out the specs and analysis below. More »

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A $15,000 DSLR? Now we’ve seen it all. No, wait — we haven’t seen it all, as Canon is just getting started with their Cinema EOS line. And they’re also just getting started with 4K acquisition: their latest addition is to be the Canon C500 (pictured), which is essentially a 4K version of the C300. More »

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The powerhouse FS700 wasn’t the only new camera that Sony recently announced. Another camera was quietly (at least to this community) introduced that packs a punch and has its sights square on Canon’s event/doc cameras: the XF100 and XF300 series. The real announcement behind the announcement is the way that Sony is positioning its separate camera models and features. Sony has a clear idea about where specific cameras should stand in terms of features and price, and it seems we might get a more powerful F3 sooner rather than later. More »

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Invitations have been sent out for a special Canon screening happening Sunday, April 15 in Las Vegas. Canon Rumors is reporting that this invitation could be a screening for Canon’s Cinema EOS 4K DSLR. Another thought is that it’s related to a Ron Howard project. Since it’s a weekend, I thought it would be a good time for some speculation about what could be announced, and what it means for the rest of the independent world if Canon does indeed announce a 4K camera at NAB (and why 4K even matters). More »

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This is a guest post by cinematographer Angelo Lorenzo.

I am torn between the Canon EOS C300 and RED SCARLET-X, I really am. In 2009 I felt like a pioneer on the Canon 5DmkII: before Redrock or any number of accessory companies were popping out rods and mounts, I had my camera with a custom machined PL adapter and iris rod bracket, and I was slapping it on everything from technocranes to steadicams. More recently I’ve been racking up hours with the Red One MX, including an AC position on a million dollar film. I’ve grown to love both the Canon and Red camps for different reasons. In the wake of both companies’ recent announcements though, the collective internet conscience has declared Red’s Scarlet as winner in some imaginary zero-sum game. More »

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Events transpired quickly during Canon and RED’s dual announcements on Thursday night, so now that the dust has settled, what are people saying about the RED SCARLET-X (left) and Canon EOS C300 (right), other than the fact that they’re basically the same price? More »

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On the right: the just-announced Canon Cinema EOS C300. But this shot from the Engadget live blog very clearly shows a DSLR on the left — with the “C” logo that indicates it’s a Cinema EOS camera. But the new EOS-1D X that we’ve seen (so far at least) doesn’t have that logo. So what is it, a 5D Mark III? Will the production 1D X have the logo, and if so what exactly delineates “Cinema”? UPDATE: turns out it’s a new full frame DSLR “under development” that offers “4K video,” which I’m interpreting to mean the same kind of “4K” as the C300 — right? I mean, why would they let a presumably cheaper DSLR upstage their historic movie camera? Either way, here’s a better picture and the press release: More »

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The just-announced Canon Cinema EOS C300 has a 4K* sensor. But yes, there’s an asterisk there, and it turns out the Super35 CMOS sensor’s native resolution of 3840×2160 (which is exactly double that of 1080P’s 1920×1080 resolution) isn’t a “traditional” 4K, and the camera outputs at 1080P. It reportedly has 1920 x 1080 pixels for red and blue, and 1920 x 2160 pixels for green. Here’s the deal from DV Info: More »

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We’ve all been wondering what Canon’s video division has been up to since their 5D Mark II HDSLR unwittingly ushered in a low-cost, large sensor video revolution. The answer three years in the making: the Canon Cinema EOS C300. There are two cameras, the C300 and C300PL, which are identical except for the PL lens mount on the latter. Via DV Info, here are the official specs: More »