» Posts Tagged ‘crowdsourcing’

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Kickstarter AussieIn late June, Kickstarter announced that their crowdsourcing platform was coming to Canada — campaigns for which will be able to launch in September. Continuing their expansion across the globe, Kickstarter announced yesterday on Twitter that campaigns will soon be open to Australia and New Zealand -based projects. When will Australians and New Zealanders be able to get their Kickstarer campaigns underway? They haven’t specified an exact date, opting for a more vague, but exciting, “in the very near future.” Continue reading for more info. More »

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dog day afternoonIf you haven’t seen Sidney Lumet’s classic Dog Day Afternoon, you’re missing out. The story of a hapless bank robber (Al Pacino) who gets trapped in a standoff with the police all so he can raise the money to pay for his partner’s gender reassignment is based on a true story. It wasn’t until 2006 that the inspiration for the title role passed away, and now the filmmakers of a new documentary about the true story behind this classic film are seeking funding in an innovative way. Click to see what makes this Dog Day doc different from the rest of the pack. More »

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Kevin SmithWhether or not you feel that people with so-called access to funding should be staying away from Kickstarter, the continued impact of crowdfunding on the world of filmmaking is fascinating to watch. Some of the recent big name crowdfunding campaigns have received criticism, and while many think it’s a good this for all of us, Kevin Smith has other ideas, stating that it’s “not fair to real indie filmmakers who need the help.” A recent interview with Smith on KCRW’s The Business reveals more of Smith’s thoughts on the issue and his plan to finance his final film in CLERKS III without the use of crowdfunding. Hit jump to find out more. More »

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Kickstarter Coming to CanadaSome exciting news for our friends up North: Kickstarter is coming to Canada. The crowdfunding giant’s last expansion was into the UK, and we wondered where they’d go next — and now we know. Kickstarter broke the news on Twitter this morning, saying that they will be open to Canada-based  projects sometime this summer. For all of our Canadian indie filmmakers and creatives, as well as the rest of us who are excited to see the great projects and films that are going to be made as a result of this, hit the jump for more info. More »

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After launching in 2010, Amazon Studios has made its way to producing original content, albeit after a bit of trial and error. The 2012 changes, thousands of scripts, and your feedback have brought 14 of Amazon’s pilot episodes from script to screen, including 8 comedies (1 of which was submitted via Amazon Studios). Now that these shows are available on Amazon Instant Video, viewers are once again being asked to share their input by rating and reviewing them; a strategy that Amazon has embraced since the beginning. More »

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There have been hundreds, if not thousands of films that have been crowdfunded and have appeared at film festivals – but only films overseas (because of U.S. laws) have been crowdinvested. If you haven’t seen the term before, or if you’ve never heard of the film, you should check out our previous coverage of the space Nazi film ‘Iron Sky.’ The film raised almost a million Euros from crowd investment, and 300,000 Euros in traditional crowdfunding money. The largest sum of money came from outside financing, which totaled 6.3 million Euros. The film recently showed at Berlin and SXSW, and it hasn’t been released yet, but you can watch the opening scene now. More »

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A year ago I asked, “Is Amazon Studios the Future of Film or is it a Bastardization of Crowdsourcing?” If you haven’t heard of it, Amazon Studios is a kind-of-strange crowdsourced movie studio, wherein Amazon.com is asking not only for script submissions but also test movies (which most often take the form of animatics) as part of their ongoing contest. To me the whole enterprise is offputting, as I tend to like movies that are sui generis as opposed to movies that are voted into existence because of a popularity contest, but hey — the film business is in need of new ideas and no one else is doing it quite like this. So, what’s happened over the last year? More »

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Along with director Kevin Macdonald and producer Ridley Scott, YouTube created the crowdsourced feature film Life in a Day from 80,000 user-submitted clips to give a flavor of what was happening all around the world on July 24, 2010. The resulting film played Sundance, Berlin, SXSW, and streamed live. Now it’s come to YouTube in its entirety for free. Watch the 90 minute feature right here: More »

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As promised, the Ridley Scott-produced and Kevin MacDonald-directed collaborative YouTube film (26 co-directors are named) will be premiering at the Sundance Film Festival tonight. Because it’s a YouTube production, however, it will also be streaming live online at 8PM EST. Life in a Day was culled from 80,000 user-submitted clips to give a flavor of what was happening all around the world on July 24, 2010. Here’s a teaser: More »

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At the currently-running 2011 Sundance Film Festival, there are a number of films that are premiering simultaneously in front of a live audience and online. One of these projects is the conclusion to the Canon- and Vimeo-sponsored Story Beyond the Still contest, which, according to Canon, is “the largest online collaborative film contest in history.” Largest or not, the chapter-by-chapter crowdsourced film has produced some great individual shorts, and now for the first time it’s available as one complete film — with a new final chapter to cap it off. Watch the 38-minute compendium in its entirety here: More »

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We last heard about YouTube’s Life in a Day project — wherein producer Ridley Scott and director Kevin MacDonald combed through 80,000 video submissions (totaling 4,500 hours) to piece together one day in the life of, well, humanity — in August. Now comes word that the filmmakers have chosen 26 co-directors from the submissions, and will be premiering the film live at Sundance, complete with a concurrent live stream on YouTube. Here’s a look at one segment of the film: More »

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Amazon has launched Amazon Studios, a new online film studio with a crowdsourced development process. Amazon has $2.7 million committed to film projects through their first-look deal with Warner Bros.; they will be awarding $140k in prizes for submissions this December. However, rather than just running a standard contest, they have some very interesting ideas for how to “develop” these projects, and they’re more than a bit controversial. More »

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I meant to post this months ago when it first came out, but Ted Hope mentioning on his Vimeo panel that he thought Star Wars Uncut was the “film of the year” motivated me to post it belatedly. So in case you haven’t already seen it, here is the crowdsourced, fan-made version of the entire first (ah, fourth) episode of Star Wars. More »

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One of Google’s lesser-known products, Google Moderator, was integrated into YouTube today. The platform — which allows for crowdsourcing, polling, and other feedback — originally launched as a standalone product in 2008. Now that it’s part of YouTube, however, it seems like a good tool for filmmakers. Here’s Google with the lowdown: More »