» Posts Tagged ‘database’

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film ltk links tutorials knowledge filmmaking camera shooting cinematography tips tricks directingLast year, NFS readers heard from Tobias Deml when he did something awesome — rigging an Android tablet not only as a Canon DSLR monitor, but also a touch-screen controller. Now, Toby has shared something even more awesome. Over the course of a year or so, he thought it may be useful to compile an organized list of filmmaking links on everything from shooting to rigging to costuming to distributing. The result is FILM LTK — standing for links, tutorials, and knowledge — and useful it most understatedly is. For Toby’s breakdown of over 250 links to all things filmmaking, check below. More »

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Ever wondered what format, camera model, lens type, finishing format, lens manufacturer, etc. was used to create a certain film? You may have found yourself punching in IMDb as your default movie trivia database, and you may have found some or all such information in the film’s technical specs page — or you may not have. While IMDb has a lot of other coverage to keep itself occupied logging (particularly cast and crew lists), you may find yourself wanting a more detailed and dedicated technical breakdown — enter ‘ShotOnWhat?More »

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Chances are, if you need temporary studio space or have to build sets on the inexpensive side of things, you don’t own a whole lot of free space to do so yourself. As such, you may be wondering what types of rental arrangements you may be able to make, where exactly, and perhaps most importantly, for how much? The good news is, there’s plenty of non-film-centric spaces likely available close to you — you just need a database that takes these off-purpose needs of yours into consideration. Beginning in New York City, a pro-arts organization called Fractured Atlas has created just such a database, with several other major cities having since followed suit. More »

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For many of us on NFS, we’re pursuing our filmmaking goals through the independent, DIY route. If you’re focused more specifically on screenwriting like myself, however, you may find yourself straddling the line writing content you can sell to the Hollywood studios and writing content you want to make as your passion project. Either way, it’s important to know what’s currently in development and production so you know what is selling and so you don’t get blindsided when you discover your current script is already in production as a major feature film. For decades, Variety and The Hollywood Reporter have been the standard trades for Hollywood. For the independent film community, IndieWire has established itself as the must-read sight. These publications typically cover done deals or finished films. For screenwriters that want to know what specs are heading out into the market before the deal is done, there’s TheGrid. More »