» Posts Tagged ‘evanluzi’

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Sarah Jones with CamerasPeople may refer to the “film community” when speaking about the industry, and while on the surface it might be easily dismissed as a vague term to describe working professionals, those involved in making TV or movies in any capacity, and on any budget level, are truly a tight-knit group of like-minded people who see fellow crew members as family. Back on February 20th, one of our own, Sarah Jones, tragically lost her life doing what she loved. The film community has come out in full force, not only honoring her on film slates, but introducing a petition to have her added to the ‘In Memorium’ tribute during Sunday’s Academy Awards [See the update below in the Petition section]. While we can do everything we can to make sure she is remembered, are we doing everything we can to prevent more accidents on and off set? More »

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Crane SunsetHere at No Film School, we’re massive fans of Evan Luzi’s website, The Black and Blue. If you’re an aspiring camera assistant, or if you’re aspiring to any camera department position, then the B&B is the single best resource on the entirety of the internet (not to mention that the newly re-designed site is absolutely gorgeous). Evan recently posted an article featuring advice from 88 of the world’s best cinematographers, and seeing so much great advice in one place can only be described as astounding. More »

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Evan Luzi, who runs The Black and Blue website that focuses on the art of camera assisting, has updated the pocket camera guides he released back in October. Some were a little disappointed that their favorite camera (mainly the GH2), was not included as part of the package. Well, if you were one of those people, fear not, because the Panasonic GH2, along with a number of other cameras, have been added to the guides. Evan has also made a few changes that make these guides even better. More »

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Nobody really wants to carry around camera manuals (at least I hope not), and if you’re frequently using different cameras, it can help to have a lot of the basic information about the camera handy. That’s why Evan Luzi, who runs a fantastically practical site about being a top-notch camera assistant called The Black and Blue (and even wrote a guest post for us), has put together a total of 20 pocket guides for basically every major filmmaking camera in use right now — from the Canon 7D all the way to the RED EPIC and Arri Alexa. More »

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Being able to properly wrap or wrangle a cable is one of the most essential skills you can learn if you haven’t been on a set before (assuming you do want to work in one of the positions in film that might actually involve being on set). While most people end up learning the hard way (by doing it wrong), you can get a head-start by watching the video embedded below and practicing on some cable you have sitting around your house. More »

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We talk a lot about specific crew positions at times, but if you’re just starting out, it’s hard to get a sense of what many of these people do unless you can see them in action. Thanks to Evan Luzi at The Black and Blue, you can check out this video he posted showing the major departments and some of their crew positions. These positions can vary slightly depending on the country you’re in, but for the most part, this is what you’ll encounter on pretty much any organized set. More »

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There are many out there shooting on DSLRs for the first time and learning the ropes as a one-man/woman band. But if you’re interested in filmmaking as a career, you’re going to be working with a crew on a set at some point in your life. Many of the professionals that read this site can probably remember how little they knew the first time they stepped on a real set, but if you’re still in school or just learning about filmmaking, here are 7 rookie mistakes to avoid your first time on set. More »

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This is a guest post by Evan Luzi, a camera assistant who runs The Black and Blue.

You step on set for the first time ever on day one of a shoot and you’re ready to impress everyone. You’ve worked hard to get to this point and it feels like now — finally — you’re where you want to be. From here on out, it should be easy.

Well, if that were the case, we’d have a lot more people working in the film industry. Instead, there’s no doubt about it: it’s tough to make a living in Hollywood.

Getting on set is just the first step in a long process. In the beginning, you need to “wow” those who gave you your opportunity in the first place.

Lucky for you, I’ve got a secret to help and it’s bound to make your first day a better one. But before I reveal it to you, let me tell you a story. More »

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Evan Luzi runs a great blog full of valuable camera department information, The Black and Blue. He also wrote a great guest post here about how to find professional crew members for free. Now Evan has released a free 145-page PDF entitled Becoming the Reel Deal, and it may remind you of a certain other free eBook — in a good way. Evan’s advice is focused on the camera department, as you’d expect given his background, but it should be brain candy for anyone looking to break into film: More »

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Evan Luzi, who runs the camera assistant blog The Black and Blue (and who also wrote a guest post here on NFS), takes a look at the crucial but unheralded position of data wrangler. The data wrangler is the person on set who is responsible for making sure that what gets recorded on camera makes it back to the editor without any data loss or corruption. This is not an action-packed video, but if you might find yourself doing work in this position it’s a nice and informative behind-the-scenes commentary. There, I warned you: I don’t want to hear any comments of “this was boring!” Hmm, that wasn’t a very good front page teaser. Well, check it out anyway: More »

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This is a guest post by Evan Luzi, a camera assistant who runs The Black and Blue.

The most amazing part of the digital cinema revolution isn’t the streamlined workflows, 5K resolutions, or the high dynamic range. It isn’t even the versatile cameras available for a couple grand. What is truly remarkable about digital cinema is its impact in the democratization of film. In theory, right now, you could take your film school money, grab a kitted out Canon 7D and go shoot a movie that visually holds up against the films playing at your local theater. The opportunity is there and while you might not need a crew for a self-made film such as a wintry montage or short landscape piece, to really dive deep into a project like a narrative feature or short film, you still need a crew. And while the technology is cheap, the people aren’t. More »