» Posts Tagged ‘filmmakeriq’

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FIQ SoundIn the first installment of Filmmaker IQ’s series on sound, host John P. Hess guided you through the the origins of sound in cinema, from early inventions like the sound-on-disk Kinetophone to the very first talkie, The Jazz Singer. But, what’s sound, anyway? And how do we get it into our movies? Hess explains all this and more in the second video in the series, giving us a simple, but comprehensive rundown on the science and engineering of sound, how microphones convert sound energy into electrical signals, as well as the varying kinds of mics used in film production. More »

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The Jazz SingerNew technologies have been, and continue to be, developed for use in cinema since the dawn of the medium. From the invention of the projector to digital filmmaking, these additions have drastically changed the future of the art form, but perhaps none so much as the introduction of sound. In the first lesson of their 6-part course, Filmmaker IQ, in partnership with RØDE, presents the history of the development of sound in the moving pictures, including when, how, and by whom the technology was created, and how it affected the cinematic world. More »

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Movie TrailerThey are the reason why we show up on time to the movie theater — “Hurry up! We’re gonna miss the previews!” Previews, movie trailers, or coming attractions are a staple of the cinematic experience and are more often than not enjoyed as pieces of art (or 1 1/2 minute short) rather than seen as advertisements (though they are both). In this comprehensive video, John P. Hess of Filmmaker IQ takes us on a journey through the history of the movie trailer, offering an interesting perspective by explaining not only how they’ve changed over time, but why they’ve changed. More »

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Screen Shot 2014-01-21 at 1.21.44 PMThe dolly zoom, also referred to as the Vertigo effect or a Zolly shot, is a technique wherein the camera is dollied either forward or backward while the zoom on the lens is pulled in the opposite direction. When timed correctly, the effect of this technique is one in which the characters in the frame remain the same size while the foreground and background become compressed or de-compressed, depending on which direction the camera is traveling. It’s a technique that has been part of the cinematic language for almost 60 years, and as such, it has evolved over time. Our friend Vashi Nedomansky over at Vashi Visuals has put together a comprehensive look at the evolution of the dolly zoom, and it’s a fantastic watch, to say the least. More »

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Jane RussellWhen actress Evan Rachel Wood took to Twitter yesterday to call out the MPAA over some deleted scenes from her film Charlie Countrymanit reminded us that the topic of censorship is and always has been a thorny issue. It’s easy to make snap judgements on either side of the aisle, especially if the history of censorship is largely unknown to you, but John P. Hess from Filmmaker IQ discusses the pivotal moments in Hollywood censorship, from the Hays Code to the MPAA, and how social progressivism and the Internet have changed and continue to change cinema. More »

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Filmmaker IQ Digital ColorColor is one of the most important and powerful visual tools through which filmmakers can convey ideas and emotion. Choices in the color palette begin with the production designer and the art department, continue through the work of the cinematographer, and end with the colorist. Through gaining an in-depth and holistic understanding of the process through which color is embedded in the films that we watch, we can begin to make the same informed color choices in our own films. Even though learning the ins and outs of color can be a life-long process, it doesn’t have to be intimidating. John Hess of Filmmaker IQ has put together yet another excellent lesson, this time explaining the intricacies of color in the digital age. More »

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Nightmare on Elm StreetHorror films have delighted audiences for over a century, from Georges Méliès’ terrifying depiction of the demon Mephistopheles in The House of the Devil (1896), to the feral children in Mama (2013). Much time has passed, and though the monsters and themes have changed and evolved, one constant has left filmmakers and filmgoers alike wondering — why do we like horror films? John P. Hess of Filmmaker IQ breaks down the psychology of scary movies, from our fascination with being scared, psychoanalytic theories, and an explanation as to why it’s good to get the bejesus scared out of you. More »

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History of HorrorWhether you’re currently working on a horror film or just a fan who watches a ton of them, learning a little bit about the history of horror is not only the most fun history lesson that exists in life, but it will also help filmmakers put certain horror concepts into a much clearer context. John P. Hess unfurls the last hundred years of horror filmmaking, covering everything from German Expressionism to independent slasher films.  Continue on to watch yet another excellent film course from Filmmaker IQ: More »

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Home-TheaterThe term “home theater” has become a little bit archaic now with the advent of VOD platforms that allow you to watch films on computers and mobile devices, but still, the ability to watch films at home was a development that changed the world of cinema forever. In yet another excellent lesson, Filmmaker IQ brings us an exhaustive look inside the history of life before the home theater, the technology that made it possible, as well as the effects it has on our culture today. More »

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A Trip to the Moon_colorWe see it every day, everywhere we go. We use it to make sense of our world. We use it in our art, to mark errors, and to know when it’s time to go at a stoplight — color. Adding color to films was one of the first major developments of cinema before the advent of sound, digital, and 3D, and John P. Hess from Filmmaker IQ gives us a video lesson on not only the history of color in filmmaking, but also the science behind it — from Isaac Newton’s experiments with optics to today’s digital color manipulation. Check out the video after the jump. More »

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Sheen 3Apocalypse Now, which was inspired by Polish author Joseph Conrad’s short novel Heart of Darkness, is a singular war film and a singular viewing experience. Moved from the Congo to Vietnam and Cambodia, Francis Ford Coppola’s epic production in the jungle, fraught with delays, illness and insanity, is almost as legendary as the film itself. Filmmaker IQ has shared a video of an interview with the film’s screenwriter, John Milius, by none other than Coppola himself. Click below and enter the heart of darkness. More »

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Screen shot 2013-06-27 at 1.08.50 PMHow often do we think about aspect ratios? Better yet, how often do we think about where all of our aspect ratios came from and the storied cinematic histories from which they were born? It’s an interesting question, not only for the sake of being more informed about the technical history of cinema, but also for having a better understanding of the implications of various aspect ratios on your film’s aesthetic and story. Hit the jump for an extensive video lesson on the history of the aspect ratio. More »

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Blackmagic is putting the finishing touches on the Cinema Camera for a late July/early August release, but some still have lingering questions about the design of the camera and the origins of the project. John Hess, who has made a number of tutorial videos and runs the site FilmmakerIQ, recently had a conversation with Dan May, president of Blackmagic Design. More »