» Posts Tagged ‘films’

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Wes AndersonThere are no other filmmakers out there like Wes Anderson. His knack for making films that feel like they’re, both, from another time and entirely immediate, as well as his ability to have constructed an entire working cinematic universe around his personal aesthetic tastes is astounding. (Can you tell I’m a fan?) If you’ve ever wanted to dive head first into a study of this universe, then you might want to check out this video series by RogerEbert.com Editor-in-Chief Matt Zoller Seitz, based on his book The Wes Anderson Collectionthat deconstructs each one of Anderson’s films, from the cinematography to the set design. More »

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William FriedkinOscar-winner William Friedkin, director of The French Connection and the greatest scary movie to ever grace the cinematic world (um — in my opinion), The Exorcist, has quite the reputation in the industry. Friedkin has gone to great, often shocking lengths to capture his vision, including straight up slapping actors across the chops to get a favorable reaction. And though his latest work hasn’t managed to reach the acclaim of his early films, he is still considered to be one of New Hollywood’s big contributors. In this 2012 Fade In Magazine interview, the director draws from his over 50 years of experience in film to share his thoughts on the current state of cinema, as well as the films that influenced him the most. More »

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Paul GreengrassAt first glance, this BAFTA lecture from Captain Phillips director, Paul Greengrass on iconic director David Lean, might seem like a simple nod to an individual career — a legendary one, but individual nonetheless. However, as Greengrass’ speech goes on, it becomes a more of a soliloquy about the life of a director —  the choices that ones has to make in order to be and continue to be one. It’s really a beautiful and powerful lecture with plenty of helpful information about the craft of filmmaking (and David Lean, too!), so continue on to check it out. More »

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WuTang ClanOne of the most influential musical groups of the last 20 years, the Wu-Tang Clan, recently announced the release of their secretly produced album, The Wu — Once Upon a Time in Shaolin, which will surely be one of a kind — literally. The hip-hop group has decided to release a single copy of the double album with a purchase price somewhere in the millions, hoping to shine a light on the value that is put on art and intellectual property — a hot button topic that has been in the mouths of many filmmakers since the proliferation of VOD. How much is art really worth in the modern age, and who stands to lose or gain as the value goes up or down? Join the discussion after the break. More »

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Criterion CollectionThe Criterion Collection offers a lot more than access to some of the best and most historically significant films from around the world (and great supplemental features, too). The site also provides studious cinephiles with its own extras, like engaging articles about these classics and their world-class filmmakers, as well as their Top 10 lists, which share the favorite Criterion films of some of the biggest creatives, who explain why they’re important to them personally and professionally. Continue on to see which classics filmmakers like Jane Campion, Christopher Nolan, Martin Scorsese, and Roger Corman put in their top 10. More »

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Pulp FictionThere’s something eerily satisfying about the juxtaposition of childhood and adulthood – for instance, the world of Edward Scissorhands comes to mind. I distinctly recall the first time I played GTA 2 after years and years of playing Mario Kart exclusively, thinking videos games were for kids. After I mowed down a group of pedestrians I said to myself, “My god — I wasn’t ready to grow up.” This juxtaposition is part of what makes these now viral illustrations depicting some of the most iconic (and also bloody, terrifying, and violent) scenes in cinematic history so awesome — it’s like walking into the children’s nursery in Peter Pan, and being greeted by Cujo instead of Nana. Continue on to check them out. More »

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CriterionSince 1984, Criterion has been dedicated to collecting, restoring, and distributing some of the most important pieces of cinema ever created. If you’re a cinephile like I am, collecting these films is not only about the novelty of their stylish covers and menus, but their invaluable behind-the-scenes and educational bonus features as well. Lucky for us, Gizmodo got the opportunity to visit Criterion’s New York headquarters, where they learned what goes into a film’s restoration. Continue on to find out how Criterion goes about acquiring, digitizing, and even designing these important films. More »

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stories we tell

Today is finally the last day of 2013! So many great moments, memories, and films have been made in independent cinema this year — some of which you might have missed. To celebrate, the NFS staff has shared their top picks for the best 2013 indie films that you might not have seen — or even heard about. Continue on to check them out! More »

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Heat shot breakdownFor those who have never made a film before, and even for those who have, the process of planning every shot is incredibly complicated and overwhelming at times. Making motivated and purposeful decisions on composition, lenses, and camera movement for each shot is essential to make coherent films, and filmschoolthrucommentaries has shared one technique used by virtually every filmmaker to study films — the shot breakdown. More »

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VideodromeThis film is not for the faint of heart. Originally titled Network of Blood and Zonekiller, Videodrome (1983) was the meta brain child of writer/director David Cronenberg, and strangely enough, taken from the filmmaker’s own life. The film was rejected by Roger Ebert and viewers at test screenings due to its depictions of sex, violence, and gore, yet is now a celebrated “disturbing techno-surrealist” cult classic. Continue on for an in-depth video of the making of Videodrome, which might be able to answer the film’s own question, “Why would anybody watch a scum show like Videodrome?” More »

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David FincherDavid Fincher’s films are known for many things, but being traditional isn’t one of them. His grim themes, low-key lighting, and aversion to happy endings work in tandem with unusual subject matter, which makes for some bleak filmmaking. The genius of Fincher is found in his ability to tap into the beautiful dark side of humanity, evoking fear, anger, and intrigue with his audience. So, what kinds of films does a director of his caliber see as important pieces of cinema? In a hand-written note, Fincher lists 26 of what he considers the greatest movies, ranging from a seemingly obvious influence, Taxi Driver, to ones that seem to come out of left field, like Animal House. More »

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young kubrickThis year, Stanley Kubrick would have turned 85. Since his death in 1999, collaborators and family members have come forward to shed light on the inner workings of one of cinema’s great directors, and the films and directors that he loved and that served as his own film school. The BFI has published a great list of Kubrick’s favorite films, influences, and an interview with his long-time producer Jan Harlan, and it’s required reading for any student of cinema. Click below to see which directors and films influenced one of the greatest directors himself! More »

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Martin Scoresese old moviesWhen a master in a craft tells you that you should do something you tend to listen. So, when Martin Scorsese mentions over 80 films that have helped him learn about cinema, I think it’s time to perk up our ears. Not only that, but he answers that question that I’m sure most of us have been asked, “Why should I watch old movies?” Check out Scorsese’s response after the jump. More »