» Posts Tagged ‘fundraising’

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b&h andrew frank how to ask for money pitchAs artists, we can ask you to work relentlessly hard hours, put on layers of zombie makeup, even borrow your expensive gear for a shoot. But you know what we have the hardest time asking for? Money! Luckily, industry professionals like Andrew Frank are around to give us practical advice on getting past our fears with simple advice in this B&H video workshop How to Ask People for Money: Anatomy of a Pitch below. More »

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dogfish accelerator demo day

As an indie filmmaker, it can be exceptionally difficult to raise money for your project — to say nothing of finding the proper channels for distribution and the most effective means of marketing what is, for all intents and purposes, your baby. Dogfish Accelerator aims to change all this by connecting filmmakers and their films with investors in a new way, taking the tech startup model and applying it to indie film. Last week they held their first Demo Day, where filmmakers got to showcase their films for investors. Here’s more about Dogfish, the accelerator model, and what it could do for you and your film!  More »

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Cassian ElwesThe details of independent film financing can be a difficult to wrap your head around, especially if you’re not business savvy. Many of us know how to go about receiving financing through crowdfunding platforms, like Kickstarter and Indiegogo, because the process is relatively simple. But when it comes to getting financing from other sources, you’ll need to have a little knowledge on how the business of film works. Producer Cassian Elwes (Blue ValentineAin’t Them Bodies SaintsLee Daniels’ The Butler,) as well as others, break down the process at a ScreenCraft seminar, giving helpful information on how financing an indie film works and where the money comes from. More »

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The American Jobs ActBack in July, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s (SEC) voted on Title II of the JOBS Act in favor of lifting the ban on general solicitation for certain private securities offerings. And yesterday, it became law. This means that filmmakers can now market their fundraising as publicly as they want — with a few stipulations. Read on for a breakdown of what the new law entails, as well as how you can qualify for general solicitation fundraising. More »

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Spike Lee KickstarterThe last month has seen quite a bit of dissension amongst filmmakers regarding Spike Lee’s decision to crowdfund his latest film on Kickstarter, but the quarrel started much earlier with the campaigns for Veronica Mars and Zack Braff’s passion project. Some say these filmmakers are pulling away pledges that would be going into other projects, and others say they’re introducing the crowdsourcing platform to new backers. Kickstarter decided to give their two cents on the matter regarding whether or not celebrities, like Spike Lee, should fundraise on a platform used by creatives who don’t have the resources or connections more readily available to established, successful, and well-known filmmakers. More »

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Spike Lee KickstarterKickstarter has descended upon the consciousness of established filmmakers and it’s here to stay. Today’s high-profile project is none other than the Newest Hottest Spike Lee Joint. There are a lot of qualms associated with celebrities using the crowd-funding model, and Spike Lee looks like he’s trying to appeal to some kind of middle ground; calling out the studio system for its perils and explaining that he has a “different vision of what Cinema can be.” Read on to get the scoop. More »

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Kevin SmithWhether or not you feel that people with so-called access to funding should be staying away from Kickstarter, the continued impact of crowdfunding on the world of filmmaking is fascinating to watch. Some of the recent big name crowdfunding campaigns have received criticism, and while many think it’s a good this for all of us, Kevin Smith has other ideas, stating that it’s “not fair to real indie filmmakers who need the help.” A recent interview with Smith on KCRW’s The Business reveals more of Smith’s thoughts on the issue and his plan to finance his final film in CLERKS III without the use of crowdfunding. Hit jump to find out more. More »

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Catapult Film FundHeads up to all of you documentarians: Do yo you have a documentary project in need of funding? Well, Catapult Film Fund provides development funding to documentary filmmakers who have secured access to their story and are ready to shoot and edit a piece for production fundraising purposes. They’re now accepting applications, so for all the details on how to apply, hit the jump. More »

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Slated - Duncan Cork and Stephan Paternot

Film financing is moving online and the new platform Slated might just be the main impetus for ushering in a new generation of film finance, professional social networking, and smart opportunities for investors and filmmakers. Slated launched this last at Sundance and has since ‘aggregated film investors representing hundreds of millions of dollars’ and has forged partnerships with some of the world’s leading financing, sales, and film companies. Aided by precision design, comprehensive user verification, ease of use, and an emphasis on clarity, Slated provides a world-class website experience that really has something to say about the future of our industry. To discuss the platform and its function in the industry is Duncan Cork, CEO and co-founder of Slated and the man responsible for its initial vision. Read on to get the scoop. More »

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It seems counterintuitive to shell out $100 or more to attend a fundraising workshop when you’re desperate for money to begin with, but if your entire fundraising strategy consists of “getting a grant from a top granting agency” in today’s climate, well it might be money well spent. Fortunately for us, IFP has uploaded an entire masterclass from 25-year-plus media executive Louise Rosen for us to watch, and we don’t have to pay a dime. What Louise outlines right off the bat is that the documentary funding landscape is in flux. Today, doc filmmakers have to get more creative, and Louise outlines just how to go about getting started on raising your budget incrementally in the video below: More »

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In the comments section of my more-contentious-than-I-expected post about making a short that ties into my forthcoming feature MANCHILD, there were a lot of questions about my project, as well as the overall wisdom of making a short in order to fundraise for a feature. Reading through the comments, I realized I could’ve delved deeper into the timeline of what’s happened since my Kickstarter campaign. So, to answer some of the questions posed in the comments — as well as to generally shoot the shit about filmmaking — I sat down (virtually) with NFS editor Joe Marine for an wide-ranging video chat. More »

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UPDATE: In response to some of the (heated! opinionated!) questions and comments on this post, we did a long video Q&A as well.

I wrote recently about finishing the screenplay for my feature MANCHILD (for now… ), but it’s been a while since I talked about what else is going on in the trenches of first-time feature filmmaking. The title of the post gives it away: we’re making a short. Why are we doing this? And why do I think this strategy makes a lot of sense for other first-time feature directors? Because there are millions of people with a screenplay, all trying to figure out how to get from here (words on a page) to there (actual finished movie). If your goal seems impossibly far off, that’s when it’s time to bite off a smaller chunk and show what you’re capable of. More »

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What if all of you who backed my campaign to make Man-child could actually have a stake in the film, so that if it makes money, you make money? I couldn’t offer you this, because in America, such profit participation is illegal thanks to the Securities and Exchange Commission. In many other countries it’s legal (see: The Age of Stupid’s brilliant campaign in the U.K.). However, thanks to the U.S. House passing the Entrepreneur Access to Capital Act last week, it seems this profit participation may soon become legal. If it does, crowdfunding as we know it could change tremendously, as will the fundamental structure of raising equity for small businesses (and films). More »

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I’ve learned a lot over the past 36 days of running a potentially record-breaking Kickstarter campaign for my film Man-child. The clock has switched from “days” to “hours” remaining and we may or may not make it! I’ve tried to share what I’ve learned about crowdfunding along the way, including a Ten Must-Read Posts Before Running Your Own Crowdfunding Campaign post. Here’s a second compilation of valuable posts.

One thing I learned after the first couple of weeks: I implemented an unsaid rule for my twitter account that I wouldn’t mention my film campaign (or retweet the mentions of others) unless I had talked about something else since my last mention of the campaign. There’s a balance between talking about yourself and remaining relevant. And while that might balance might have shifted over the past few days — there are only 2 days left, so my sense of urgency is overpowering the desire to show self-promotion restraint — this Twitter lesson is included in one post below.

As I say in the introduction to the first ten, “luck favors the prepared.” And in setting out to run this campaign, I read a whole lot more than ten posts. So here’s a second set of ten posts to read when preparing your own campaign. More »

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KooTen down, twenty-eight days to go. I’m learning as I go with the Kickstarter campaign for ‘Man-child’, which just passed 500 backers! In addition to last week’s Ten Must-Read Posts Before Running Your Own Crowdfunding Campaign, I thought I’d jot down some some thoughts, tips, and quotes from the first week of my campaign, which has included some triumphs — and mistakes. If you’re considering trying to crowdfund a project in the future, I hope these notes will be helpful. More »

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I just launched a Kickstarter campaign for my first feature film (seen at left), and I hope if you’re reading this that you’ll help me turn my dream into reality. Seriously: my entire life has been leading up to this, and I can’t do it without you. However, this site has always been about helping others while I’m learning these things myself, so I kept track of all the valuable posts I found during my research. If you’re thinking running your own crowdfunding campaign — defined as asking for small amounts of money from a large number of people, as opposed to asking for large amounts of money from a small number of people — consider the following posts essential reading. I should note on my own campaign that there are some great rewards available — get the entire film for just $10, or get a producer credit for $120!

Louis Pasteur once said, “chance favors the prepared mind.” If you use an all-or-nothing platform like Kickstarter, as I am, you’re taking a huge chance: if you don’t make your goal, you get nothing. To prepare, then, I read everything I could get my hands on. Here are ten of the most helpful posts for anyone thinking about launching their own fundraising effort on Kickstarter, Indiegogo, or any of the other crowdfunding sites: More »

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Finnish director Timo Vuorensola’s forthcoming feature Iron Sky, which I’ve mentioned previously, has released a very nicely animated overview of their innovative production process to date. There’s a lot to be learned here when it comes to the future of film, both good and potentially bad; I’m a huge proponent of crowdfunding, but find myself hesitant to embrace the idea that crowdsourcing the creative aspects of a screenplay is a good idea. Call me old-fashioned, but I still believe in the “singular vision” of auteurs. Here’s their video highlighting the different creative and financial strategies they’ve employed to date: More »

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I’m going to be launching a Kickstarter campaign sometime in late July, which will be my first crowdfunding effort. Other than backing projects, however, I don’t have much experience with crowdfunding. Thankfully plenty of previous campaign-runners have shared their fundraising experiences on the web; these articles collectively add up to a sort of “crowdfunding best practices.” Joey Daoud at Coffee and Celluloid is responsible for the first three posts, from which I pulled the above graphic (about average donation amount):

(Thanks @grking for the fifth link)

[via Filmmaker Magazine]