» Posts Tagged ‘google’

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red youtube 4k open source vp9 codec channelRED is well-known as a proponent of 4K, and as a manufacturer of cameras capable of shooting at that resolution (and higher). It’s also no stranger to the consumer 4K-viewing realm, a growing market in which the company’s REDRAY streaming player competes. Now, RED has announced it has been working with YouTube to employ and improve the open-source VP9 codec for encoding of 4K media to select channels, as opposed to the comparably-efficient but legally-entangled H.265 (aka HEVC) codec. And, to kick off the party, RED has also opened up the new “Shot on RED” channel to host and aggregate RED-shot footage and films. More »

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bufferingStreaming video is a sort of bellwether for the health of your internet connection; after all, it uses arguably the most day-to-day horsepower of the information super parkway, and has become, in the past few years, ubiquitous. Streaming capabilities have become an accurate measure of the efficacy of any ISP, but finding out how each stacked up was a challenge. Last year, Google rolled out its inaugural Video Quality Report, which looked at streaming speeds in Canada. Now, as of today, it’s the U.S.’s turn, and the results are interesting, to say the least. After the jump, see where your ISP stacks up. More »

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google drive cloud storage syncing file sharing service desktop mobile appUntil recently, Google Drive didn’t necessarily have more going for it than similar services like Dropbox. Tight integration with Gmail makes permissions management a breeze, and the real-time collaboration abilities offered by Google Docs is arguably revolutionary. Drive’s desktop syncing app has always felt a little tacked-on, though, whereas Dropbox’s version has felt truly native since day one. In any case, Google recently made what may be the most convincing point of argument yet to use their cloud app by expanding its storage pricing system exponentially. In other words, the $10 I used to pay monthly for 200 GB now gets me 1 TB. In what TechCrunch calls cloud “storage wars,” that kind of upgrade is a pretty big deal. But as filmmakers, why do we care? More »

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Google GlassIn 1960, the Eclair camera system revolutionized the way documentary filmmakers could interact with their subjects. As a result of this technological breakthrough, and the infinite possibilities of an unfettered handheld camera, cinéma vérité was born and handheld narrative films followed suit. Cut to the year 2014, and a new technology has surfaced that could once again change the way visual stories are told. I’m talking of course about Google Glass, and any other interactive eyewear that will surely come along soon. Even though Google Glass is mostly seen as a plaything for trendy techies, one filmmaker has already begun to tell stories in a way that we’ve never seen before, and the results are fascinating. More »

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Google ChromecastSince Google released Chromecast last year, the little ‘HDMI dongle’ has had two big things going for it — Netflix and YouTube. Of course, given its simplicity and ridiculously low price of $35, it hasn’t had much going against it either. Even with some creative work-arounds via Google Chrome ‘tab casting,’ Chromecast’s downside has been its short list of natively supported apps — despite subsequent support for Hulu, Pandora, and HBO GO. Well, all that’s changed, because Google has announced the public release of the device’s SDK. In short, this turns what was a very exclusive party into a fiesta that any developer can join. Many more native apps are sure to follow, but how can this benefit filmmakers? More »

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Vp9-logo-for-mediawiki.svg2014K Continues! When we last posted about the VP9 codec it was just beginning to threaten H.265 for dominance, but recent hardware partnerships with nVidia, ARM, Sony and many other tech giants solidifies VP9 as the next go-to HD and 4K streaming codec. Google’s previous VP8 codec failed to win out over H.264, which was already massively adopted by the time VP8 showed up. However, with this announcement Google looks poised to win this round of the knock-down drag out codec war. Will VP9 succeed where VP8 failed? Hit the jump to learn more. More »

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Video thumbnail for youtube video How Youtube Works - No Film SchoolIn an effort to get videos to stream more reliably regardless of your connection speed, the YouTube team at Google continues to innovate and utilize different distribution methods to get videos buffering as little as possible and in the highest quality possible. Here’s a great video from Computerphile that explains just how complicated their delivery system actually is, and how they get high-traffic videos to actually load faster (and the video itself is on YouTube, of course): More »

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YouTube Logo1Rival service Vimeo launched their Music Store back in 2011, and now just two years later, Google is doing something similar for creators with their YouTube Audio Library. While the Music Store was designed as a way to allow creators to sell or give away their music with certain restrictions, the new YouTube Audio Library is designed to be completely free without any royalties, and the music can be used for any video you create (even outside of YouTube). Check out some samples from the new Audio Library below and read more about how you can use the files. More »

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google remind me functionalityYou know how you covertly check the website of that cheesy sci-fi series or British sitcom-with-laughtrack you love, but can’t admit you watch, to check for new episodes while nobody’s looking? Now, you can actually have Google send you a reminder to your Android or iOS device when there’s something new to watch with the “Remind Me” feature in Google Now. At the end of August, Google Operating System noticed the update, and after a few weeks of limited availability and functionality, the feature is now live for many of you to try! More »

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Google ChromecastGoogle recently unveiled Chromecast, a very inexpensive HDMI adapter that turns any TV into a “Smart Television,” allowing you to use your phone, tablet, or laptop to run apps like Netflix or YouTube, as well as mirror a Chrome browser tab, all over WiFi onto your big screen. While there are quite a few devices out there capable of similar functions (not including TVs themselves), Chromecast may just be the cheapest, easiest, and most portable solution yet. More »

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YouTube logoIn the late 90s, it seems like everyone had a startup, but no one, especially the media giants, knew exactly how they were going to make money off this new thing called the Internet. Would there be a machine next to your computer that accepted quarters, à la those massaging beds you see in movies but have never seen in real life? Would it come from subscription fees, like the old AOL model? It turns out the answer was ads, mostly, and with its model, individual users can earn quite a bit of money with their YouTube videos. An infographic shows how at least one segment of the internet is making its scratch, moolah, bread, cab fare, etc. Click below to check out how much sweet, sweet money the top 1,000 channels are making! More »

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Google Offline Disk ImportEver need to upload massive amounts of data to cloud based storage but can’t afford to commit the computing time? Don’t have the bandwidth? For $80 you can ship a hard drive to Google and they will upload it to the cloud for you. While currently the service is only available in a ‘limited preview’ in the United States, this could prove an interesting option for filmmakers needing to store large amounts of data. Hit the jump for more info on Google’s Offline Disk Import service. More »

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WebM VP9 Video Compression CodecLet the next-gen online video compression wars begin. H.265, the codec that was approved earlier this year as an ITU-T standard and claims to be 50% more efficient than its predecessor H.264, now looks to have some competition in the Google-partnered WebM open-source V9 format, a step up from the highly adopted V8. Read on to watch some side by side comparisons and find out what this codec might do for you. More »

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I wasn’t really expecting to have to refer to the theoretical ‘Instagram of Video’ for another while — major choices for mobile users are already in place and ‘in the running’ for such a title, and it could be a while before everyone in the discussion unanimously declares one app the victor (if ever). The Verge (seemingly in a nod to comments) acknowledged YouTube as the elephant in the room for these apps, because even on iOS where the YouTube app is read-only (well, watch-only — no uploads), the service is the megalith for easily-socialized video. A complete YouTube experience is already native on Android (again, YouTube is Google is Android), perhaps to the chagrin of recent Android-joiner Viddy. A new development may totally shift the dynamics of this interplay, however: Google just yesterday released YouTube Capture for iOS. More »

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There have been several big pushes by social video sites recently aimed at providing support to content creators and partners — the biggest of which (of all time, in fact) saw YouTube spending a third of a billion dollars on original channels and accompanying marketing. Amazingly, YouTube doesn’t seem satisfied to stop there. It has recently opened multi-scope studio facilities in London and L.A. — and unlike its original channels venture, which aims a massive amount of resources towards a 1% of already high-profile channel owners, these facilities are open for any and all YouTube partners to use — and at absolutely no cost to them. More »

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Depending on how much time you spend on or around YouTube, you may already be aware of the site’s original channels venture – which is not to be confused with its partnering program, a far easier monetization leap to make for the everyday user with a high-traffic upload. Interchangeably called ‘YouTube original’ or ‘premium’ channels (but not like cable TV premium channels — they mean quality of content, not ticket price), the venture was announced about a year ago and launched just this past January. Unfortunately, the returns so far have been pretty lackluster. Now, YouTube is certainly not giving up on what seems to have been an overall rough turnout —  they are, however, seriously cutting back numbers on partner renewals. More »

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This is a guest post by Whitney Adams.

There are literally thousands of apps on the iOS and Android platforms, and plenty of them are actually useful for filmmakers. Having some of these apps is like having an entire production office or studio in your pocket. App developers have created tools for all different skill levels, so whether you are just starting your career or have been at it for a while, there is an app for you. Here are 5 that just might make your filmmaking experience more productive: More »

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When I originally wrote, “Google TV is what independent filmmakers have been waiting for,” in retrospect I forgot the “is” at the beginning of the sentence and the question mark at the end. So far the answer to that question has been, admittedly and unfortunately, a resounding “no” — so much so that, despite being sent a Google TV by Google (in part because of writing that article), I still haven’t set it up. But when it comes to independent film distribution, the TV is the final frontier, and whether or not Google TV version 1 made an impact, version 2 is currently rolling out this week and looks to improve things significantly. Oh, and rumors are flying that Apple is apparently getting into the TV game for real (the current Apple TV is nothing more than a hobby). More »

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Back in November I criticized Google’s Android operating system for lacking an iTunes-esque media marketplace. Android’s openness seemed a good match for independent content creators, except it lacked a streamlined way to sell media content. Yesterday, at Google I/O, the Big G finally announced an Android Movies Marketplace, as well as an Amazon Cloud Player-esque Music Beta. While the former is a proper Movie rental marketplace, the latter is not a direct iTunes competitor, but rather a cloud-based synching player: Dropbox for music, if you will. Despite Android’s potential, however, at launch neither solution seems to be particularly consequential for independent content creators. More »

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In the world of digital content distribution, things are changing so quickly that if you blink, you miss it. With iTunes and iOS, Apple is the 800 lb gorilla in the room, and ever since the iPad became the fastest-selling gadget in history, the elephant in the room (too many analogous animals in the room now?) has been magazine subscriptions. The iPad has the perfect form-factor for reading magazines — I personally like the Kindle more for reading books — but until now, Apple didn’t offer a standardized method of “subscribing” to a magazine. Until now. And as it turns out, Apple’s new subscription terms are going to govern far more than magazine subscriptions, but applications sales, video distribution, and more. More »