» Posts Tagged ‘guestpost’

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This is a guest post by Evan Luzi, a camera assistant who runs The Black and Blue.

You step on set for the first time ever on day one of a shoot and you’re ready to impress everyone. You’ve worked hard to get to this point and it feels like now — finally — you’re where you want to be. From here on out, it should be easy.

Well, if that were the case, we’d have a lot more people working in the film industry. Instead, there’s no doubt about it: it’s tough to make a living in Hollywood.

Getting on set is just the first step in a long process. In the beginning, you need to “wow” those who gave you your opportunity in the first place.

Lucky for you, I’ve got a secret to help and it’s bound to make your first day a better one. But before I reveal it to you, let me tell you a story. More »

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Producer Jon Kilik (who has an untouchable resume of 37 films) told Emerging Visions participants earlier this week a great story about working with Spike Lee. Spike told Jon for Do the Right Thing, his third feature, he wanted Robert DeNiro, a budget of $10 million, and a June 30th, 6AM start date. In Jon’s words, “we didn’t get DeNiro, we didn’t get $10 million, but on June 30th at 6AM we rolled camera.” This is a guest post about start dates by director Jeff Orgill, whose feature comedy Junkie Nurse debuted on Prescreen today.

You’re thinking of directing your first feature film – you are about to dive off a cliff into a lake far below. When to jump? When to jump?…

This is your “start date.” Filmmaking can be full of Catch-22 situations — how do I get the name cast without the money? Or the money without the name cast? — and so on. But the big daddy of them all is picking your start date. You don’t want to commit to a date without everything in place — what if we don’t have the budget by the start date? What about that location we don’t have yet? But without a start date you will never make your film. More »

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This is a guest post by filmmaker/author Jon Reiss, whose brand new co-authored book Selling Your Film Without Selling Your Soul is 100% free (until the end of September) and 100% essential reading for filmmakers. Seriously: do not miss this book.

Two years ago I wrote a book Think Outside the Box Office which is a nuts and bolts guide to direct distribution and marketing for films that I wish I had when I released my feature Bomb It (about graffiti and street art all over the world). Last week marked the launch of Selling Your Film Without Selling Your Soul  (SYFWSYS) a book that I wrote with Sheri Candler and The Film Collaborative – which is available for free digitally until October 1 and also available in paperback.   SYFWSYS includes marketing and crowdfunding strategies, distribution spends, community building and detailed ancillary and digital distribution numbers for the following films: Ride The Divide, The Cosmonaut, The Best and The Brightest, Sita Sings the Blues, Note by Note, Bass Ackwards, Adventures of Power, American: The Bill Hicks Story, Undertow, For the Bible Tells Me So, and the webseries PioneerOne. What follows is an excerpt from one of my chapters in the book about the release of a film Ride the Divide. More »

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This is a guest post by Zack Lieberman, a filmmaker in preproduction on his debut (3D) feature. He was also co-creator of The West Side with NoFilmSchool’s numero uno, Koo.

This post is fundamentally a review of the twin-lens, 3D JVC GS-TD1 camcorder and so I’ll get it out of the way up front and say that I really liked this camera. A lot. For a two lens system, it’s incredibly small and durable, it makes a beautiful image, and is about as good as I could reasonably expect for 2011. Done! Okay, fine, I’ll go a bit more in-depth, but this won’t be an extremely technical rundown. I will talk a lot about why I think 3D is the future, though. More »

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This is a guest post by Evan Luzi, a camera assistant who runs The Black and Blue.

The most amazing part of the digital cinema revolution isn’t the streamlined workflows, 5K resolutions, or the high dynamic range. It isn’t even the versatile cameras available for a couple grand. What is truly remarkable about digital cinema is its impact in the democratization of film. In theory, right now, you could take your film school money, grab a kitted out Canon 7D and go shoot a movie that visually holds up against the films playing at your local theater. The opportunity is there and while you might not need a crew for a self-made film such as a wintry montage or short landscape piece, to really dive deep into a project like a narrative feature or short film, you still need a crew. And while the technology is cheap, the people aren’t. More »

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This is a guest post by writer Nadia Jones.

Using film as a means for communication, inspiration, and entertainment, humankind uses pictures and stories to further explore our thoughts, beliefs, and world. These seven TED talks given by famous filmmakers, producers, and directors tap into the amazing potential of film as an art form, exploring the nature of inspiration, creativity, and communication. More »

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This is a guest post by filmmaker Seth Hymes, who runs Film School Secrets. He previously posted about whether film school is worth is in 2011.

Since graduating from NYU, I have met many DIYers who have expressed a desire to go back to film school to learn more about the craft of filmmaking. But they are typically surprised when I explain what is typically taught in the first year at any major film school. In this blog post, I’d like to share with you a very simple way to get a similar filmmaking experience to what a student at NYU, USC, or New York Film Academy gets — without paying a lot in tuition. More »

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Note: I have argued both for and against film school in the past, and as I say on this site’s about page, “different strokes for different folks.” This is a guest post by filmmaker Seth Hymes, who runs Film School Secrets. Image by LuMaxArt.

Film schools are a great place to learn the basics of filmmaking and meet like minded collaborators. They also provide a structured environment to experiment and hone your craft. Unfortunately, I’ve met more than my fair share of young NYU and USC film school alumni deeply in debt with no clear job leads or any idea how to start making movies for a living. I’ve also met many DIYers who wonder if they missed out by skipping school. With tuition costs continuing to rise, and HD equipment costs continuing to plummet, the film school debate is worth reopening in 2011. My goal in this post is to shed some light on the specifics of investing in film school and also share some cheaper alternatives to get a film education in a classroom setting. More »

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This is a guest post by filmmaker William Speruzzi.

1. Use SAG talent (if you can) – If the budget can take the hit, go for people who have experience and know how to conduct themselves on a set, rehearse, etc. It will save you time and aggravation in the end. The last thing you want to do is teach someone how to act while you’re making your film. If you can’t go this way, get non-union but make sure all the talent is non-union. If you have a cast of ten actors and one actor is SAG then you still have to become a SAG signatory. An audience can forgive a scene that’s shot a little too dark but they will never believe a film that has poor acting. More »

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This is a guest post by musician Milosz Jeziorski.

Your most powerful asset as a filmmaker is understanding the tools available to tell your story. As filmmakers, we are creators and initiators of experiences and emotions. A film is ultimately successful when the audience can feel connected to the ‘emotional narrative’ the film traverses. If you’re a frequent reader of NoFilmSchool then you already have an edge in understanding the tools available for the visual aspect of film. This article aims to put you in control of the aural tools: sound and music. I’ve seen directors improve their films tenfold by taking the time to consider the role that sound and music play in a film. More »

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This is a guest post by multimedia journalist/publicist Kristen Lepore.

How has the past year changed the outlook for independent film? As roundtable moderator and The Hollywood Reporter journalist Jay Fernandez stated, “It’s an interesting time for filmmaking in general, but the indie world is a bit of a crap shoot from picture to picture, year to year.” The point of Whitewater Films‘ roundtables is to share information and intelligence, according to Whitewater Films founder Rick Rosenthal (Halloween II, Halloween: Resurrection). And it did just that. Here’s a taste of what I learned from February’s all-women panel. More »

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This is a guest post by filmmaker Robin Schmidt, who today courts controversy with his ongoing series Choosing an Online Video Platform. Next time you see a view count in the millions, you might wonder where some of those views came from! This is not to say that I’m suggesting filmmakers cheat, but NoFilmSchool is devoted to sharing the tools that might help a filmmaker succeed, and the ability to hack YouTube is certainly worth filing under “good to know” — even if you never employ such tactics. Without further ado, here’s Robin: More »

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Have a filmmaking experience you’d like to share? Got your hands on some good (or bad) equipment? Record a helpful tutorial? Interview another filmmaker? All of this content is of interest to us, but I simply don’t have the time or resources to cover every story out there. I have managed to build a site that’s read by thousands of filmmakers and other creatives every day, however, and as a result writing a guest post here can be a great source of exposure for you and/or your project. More »

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This is a guest post by Mike Jones, Lecturer in Screen Studies at the Australian Film Television and Radio School.

Filmmaking is full of traditions. These traditions are the “way things are done,” they are what is “expected,” they are “industry standard,” they are “default” and “accepted.” This is all fine and dandy until we recognise the innate implication of such Traditions is to imply Right and Wrong – that there is a correct way to do things and deviations are “incorrect,” not “acceptable” or, worse still, not “professional.”

These traditions manifest themselves in all manner of guises – creative, technical, business, logistic. I have written previously about how the tools of filmmaking (particularly software) possess internal philosophies that enforce traditions – traditions which may or may not be a good fit for your own creative processes. In a similar light, there occurs to me to be another long-standing and entrenched tradition (one that may not be serving emerging and indie filmmakers as it should) that needs to be questioned. That is the significance of the Short Film. More »

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This is a guest post by Alexander Fox, founder of 5DFilmMaking and Vid35.

Thanks to the rapid adoption of HD-enabled DSLRs, many photographers have discovered that they like working with video. However, they don’t necessarily like working with video on a DSLR. Now that the novelty of cinematic depth of field has faded, it’s a good time to take a quick look at the other options available for capturing “motion pictures.” More »