» Posts Tagged ‘lucasfilm’

Description image

JJ Abrams Role in Star Wars Episode VIIFilming for Star Wars: Episode VII has just begun with J.J. Abrams at the helm, and while they are currently shooting in Abu Dhabi, when the production returns to Pinewood Studious in the UK, you’ll have a chance to not only meet the director and check out the production, but actually be on-screen in the movie itself! Check out the video below for the whole scoop, as well as a sneak peek of the new production. More »

Description image

Lucasfilm Real-Time Computer GraphicsWhile J.J. Abrams has claimed a number of times that he wants to use more practical effects to make the new generation of Star Wars films feel more “real,” the usage of computer generated imagery is only growing. More and more live-action movies are creating entire scenes in post-production. Those kinds of effects will continue to get more realistic, but at what cost to productions (since things aren’t exactly getting cheaper)? Post-production schedules are shrinking while effects budgets are exploding, so what are filmmakers to do? Lucasfilm, the company responsible for Star Wars, wants to take real-time CGI to the next level and revolutionize the filmmaking process. Check out some of what they are working on below. More »

Description image

There are already plenty of universities and colleges that teach communications and film, but very few schools below that level get much further than basic art and music classes. Teaching film in schools, or at least using the language of film to help teach communications, is rarely considered in these lower-level schools. Usually if films are even shown, it’s when there’s nothing to teach, or as a break from regular classes. In the videos below (which were recorded in 2006 and 2005, respectively), Martin Scorsese and George Lucas discuss the importance of visual literacy and using the language of cinema in education. More »

Description image

There’s something funny about watching so much money and so much equipment being put to use alongside a little $3,000 still camera. Note that the 1D Mark IV, 5D Mark II, and 7D aren’t being used as the A cam — Red Tails is being shot on a Sony F35, perhaps questionably (I still think period pieces look better on film). Lucasfilm’s Rick McCallum hired DSLR champion Philip Bloom to operate: More »