» Posts Tagged ‘mixing’

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mixingboardThe art of manipulating sound is an occult practice, mysterious and daunting to outsiders, though in reality, like almost everything, a little education goes a long way and the information is out there if you look for it; since many filmmakers, though, are taught from the beginning (at least I was), to shoot MOS and concentrate solely on the visual, with sound a distant second, it can be a blind spot in their skill set, but a vital skill. And with the concomitant proliferation of audio technology (specifically DAWs, or Digital Audio Workstations), there’s no excuse for an indie filmmaker not to educate themselves in the art of noise. Click through for five tips on EQing sound, for filmmakers! More »

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GravityAlfonso Cuarón’s space drama Gravity exploded at the box office this weekend, outperforming other releases with its record-breaking October debut of $55.6. The film’s visual effects have been the talk of the town, but the sound engineering is the other half of the technical spectacle that is Gravity. SoundWorks Collection sits down with Cuarón and Re-recording Mixer Skip Lievsay to talk about the sound team’s realistic approach to creating a rich, dynamic, and dramatic soundscape in the dark vacuum of space. Continue on to check out the video. More »

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Video thumbnail for vimeo video Audio101 - What is a Submix - nofilmschoolJust as digital imagery can be manipulated in post with a number of approaches — combinations of which may be used to achieve pretty much the same effect — working with audio is a malleable exercise. It’s become even more malleable recently thanks to innovative sound manipulation interfaces which provide a powerful palette for painting, re-painting, and un-painting sound. That said, some tenets of the basic audio interface design haven’t changed much in decades. One such basic is the submix. Check out a great demonstration of the undiminished usefulness — and power — of ‘subs’ below. More »

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I would be called an “audiophile” if I’d ever had enough money to actually buy top-quality audio equipment. In lieu of such funds, however, I’m often on the lookout for good deals in the audio world. And while I’m never going to spend $2,700 on a pair of headphones, if it were possible to get 50% as good sound for 5% of the price, I’d jump at that opportunity. So I went to B&H Photo to listen to dozens upon dozens of sets (unlike a lot of stores, B&H has many headphones — maybe 50 in all — plugged into the same source, with individual volume controls for each). After hours spent listening, here’s what I discovered: the Audio-Technica ATH-M50 ($120) and ATH-M35 ($55) sound as good as headphones costing several times as much. More »