» Posts Tagged ‘monetization’

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“Do short films have monetary value?” Filmmaker Robin Schmidt, who after many short films and music videos recently completed his first feature film, digs in and offers some intriguing observations in the guest post below, as well as his idea for a solution with the help of Vimeo. After reading the post, we’d also like to know what you think. Do short films have monetary value? If so, what solutions can you come up with that will allow filmmakers to monetize their shorts?

This is a guest post by filmmaker Robin Schmidt. More »

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vimeo-e1378182278821Vimeo has long been known for the quality of their video, and has become a haven for filmmakers who want a higher quality upload than is available from other video sites. Now they are experimenting with a new platform whereby filmmakers who debut their films at the Toronto Film Festival this week are eligible for $10,000 in funding if they distribute through Vimeo On Demand, the site’s online distribution channel launched in March earlier this year. Click below to check out this new platform and see what it could mean for indie filmmakers. More »

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DynamoPlayer, one of the first the to market in terms of the ‘direct-to-consumer‘ paradigm, has officially bit the dust. They will spend the next few months closing out accounts and letting users collect their remaining balances before they shut down existing video players in mid-June. By the end of June, the platform will be shut down completely. Read on for the press release from Dynamo. More »

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While it’s been in private beta since November, Vimeo has finally unveiled details of their pay-to-view service, which they are now officially calling Vimeo On Demand. This is a big move for the video streaming website, which up until now has only offered the option to tip users. There are plenty of options for creators to sell their content online, but it’s far more convenient to sell through a service that’s already familiar with millions of users. Check out more details of the new service below. More »

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Sometimes it seems like the numbers of services allowing for film self-distribution are expanding so rapidly it’s a bit overwhelming, or at least a little difficult to keep up with. This type of flooding can really only benefit the filmmaker, though, seeing as each project’s release vector can be paired with the most appropriate service instead of being stuck choosing between a mere few. It may be time to add another notch to your list of options, because now — with the help of film-centric audience builder-organizer Crowdstarter — a service called PUMit is looking to get your film out into the world, get ticket revenue straight to your wallet, and provide you with all the tools to do so successfully along the way. More »

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We knew monetization on Vimeo was coming sooner or later, and after they introduced Tip Jar back in September, they also discussed some early plans for a Pay-to-View/online VOD service sometime in the near future. Today they introduced that service in a strictly test run format: Vimeo Movies. While it will not be open to the public until next year, they currently have six films available, and will release more before the service launches in full. If you’re a Vimeo PRO member, you’ll already be on your way to selling your film when the service comes out of private beta, but what about the rest of Vimeo’s users? More »

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Content creators have a few ways they can choose to monetize their media. And while some manner of high profile and hype are needed to make a true self-distribution success story (the major caveat inherent to self-distro), the possibility is there for any of us. After about 20,000 years, Vimeo is finally putting the power to get paid into the hands of Plus/Pro subscribers (just kidding Vimeo, we love you), though it isn’t entirely clear whether their upcoming Direct-to-Audience system will be available for Vimeo Pro users only. This is a likelihood, because it adds considerable incentive to opt for Pro’s $200 annual plan over Plus’s $60/year subscription. Until recently, we were under the impression we would have to wait for the “early 2013″ release of their native services to sell/rent on Vimeo — as it turns out, the ability to monetize content beyond discretionary donations (tip-jar) is not only available to us at this very moment, but actually has been for several months. It’s called Cleeng PLAY and the details are below. More »

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Slowly but surely outlets for online media distribution are blossoming — with some major players finally rolling out monetization options and others already in place. We’re starting to not only have the ability to self-distribute, but also pick what’s best for us from among some healthy competition. One of the more recent developments in pro-creator content delivery systems (that’s PCCDSs — can that be a thing from now on?) is VHX distribution, not to be confused with VHS distribution, which is completely different. VHX originally began as a video sharing social media platform, which is very functional but still largely in its infancy. In addition to this service, however, VHX has already proven its potential for media monetization with its first two web releases — both tailor-made for the client and DRM-free. Click through for the full low-down. More »

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A year ago I called monetization the elephant in the room for Vimeo, writing, “if you really want to empower independent content creators, you must give them a way to make a living.” I’ve been wondering for quite some time if and how Vimeo was going to enable independent filmmakers to make money from their videos, since Vimeo is really the elephant in the independent filmmaking room: with 13 million registered users and 75 million monthly unique visitors, they’re almost certainly the largest community of independent filmmakers in the world. Today Vimeo is launching a donation feature called Tip Jar, and coming down the line is a much bigger deal: direct-to-audience video sales. More »

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This is a guest post by filmmaker Robin Schmidt a.k.a. El Skid.

If you receive Koo’s regular newsletter (and you should by the way) you’ll have recently read a short appraisal of the various video sharing sites currently around. I’ve been developing a weekly comedy show called Super Massive Raver which we’re looking to monetize online and, believe me, once you start digging into this area the reading gets pretty grim pretty quickly. More »

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Full Disclosure

06.28.10 @ 3:19PM Tags : , ,

Last year the Federal Trade Commission passed legislation [PDF link] requiring bloggers to disclose their connections to products, advertisers, and other sources of income. I’m not exactly raking it in with NoFilmSchool, so I didn’t write the disclosures page for the government’s sake, but rather for anyone who’s interested in methods of web site monetization. For example, on the page I mention that I’m using Pretty Link Pro, which is a great tool for shortening, managing, and tracking links. As I find more and better ways to monetize the site, I’ll update the page accordingly. Disclosures »

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… is what happens when you click the play button: nothing actually plays. Anytime you’re going to ask someone for money to play a video — which is something we all need to figure out how to do — you need to have the trailer or something give a preview first. Here’s the Dynamo Player player in its albeit beta form: More »

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Can a blog like NoFilmSchool be self-sustaining? As a blogger you can make money by being a contributor to a huge tech or political blog, wherein you’re one of many staff writers churning out content every day — which I’ve done — but can you turn a profit by writing about what’s important to you, on your own site, in your own way? In my recent manifesto I talked about blog revenue being one (small) slice of the self-sustaining pie, and on this site’s about page I wrote, “a big part of figuring out how to be independently creative — and by this I mean, being able to work on your own creations, for yourself, without having a day job — is figuring out how to derive value from the content you create.” Here, then, are the traffic and revenue stats from NoFilmSchool for the just-concluded month of April: More »