» Posts Tagged ‘netflix’

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Netflix UK Ireland TaggerDo you watch hours upon hours of shows and movies on Netflix? Wish you could get paid for all that time you log? Turns out the company is looking for people to do exactly this as part of their recommendation system for viewers. In a new job listing, Netflix is seeking people just like you who can watch and analyze both movies and TV shows, and then describe them with tags before they start streaming to the general public. Here’s a video that breaks it all down: More »

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vimeo-logoEveryone and their mother is getting in on the VOD game, and for some time, Vimeo has been positioning itself as a way for indie filmmakers to get their content to viewers and see a profit; they’ve just introduced new bells and whistles for filmmakers and content creators, including several new features for their PRO users who distribute content using the service, including a revamped dashboard and more in-depth metrics to help creators see where their work is selling. Check it out and see what Vimeo’s VOD could do for you and your film. More »

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Nate SilverIn 2008, Nate Silver became a household name when his website FiveThirtyEight delivered eerily accurate predictions about the outcome of the presidential race. His results flummoxed traditional pollsters and analysts because his results came from exhaustive analysis of data on every possible “metric” related to voter behavior; suddenly, traditional opinion polling was, if not obsolete, highly suspect. 6 years later, his website is owned by Disney, and big data is the word on everyone in Hollywood’s lips. Yesterday at the Tribeca Film Festival, Silver, House of Cards creator Beau Willimon, The Wire and Treme‘s David Simon, veteran journalist Anne Thompson and moderator John Hockenberry sat down for a conversation about if storytelling may become a matter for statisticians rather than screenwriters. Click through to hear what they had to say! More »

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Igor MartinovicTelevision cinematography has come quite a ways in the past 10 years. In the arena of episodic television, where multi-camera shoots with high-key lighting were once the norm, incredibly cinematic single-camera cinematography has now taken hold. Although many of HBO’s and AMC’s offerings started the ball rolling with this delightful trend, the Netflix original drama House of Cards is the absolute epitome of dramatic cinematography in an episodic show. Igor Martinovic, the cinematographer from the second season of House of Cards, recently sat down with our friends at the GoCreative Podcast and he shared quite a bit about the cinematography of this world-class show. More »

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Netflix 4K4K is pretty much “the next big thing,” like it or not. Of course, for 4K to really mesmerize you in your living room, there will need to be both UHD TVs and 4K content available — eventually. As far as the content side of things goes, Netflix is taking 4K delivery very seriously. And while widespread availability of true ultra-high def media is going to take some time, you may not have to wait nearly as long for select Netflix presentations in 4K. In fact, if you own one of a select few types of smart TVs, you may be watching the second season of House of Cards in 4K this coming Spring. More »

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lazlo_vilmos01As November comes to a close, the holiday season is officially upon us. Alongside the decadent meals and retail shopping absurdity, most of us have a few extra days off to lounge around in our pajamas and watch movies. If you’re like me, however, the process of figuring out what to watch is way more daunting than it should be. For that reason, I’ve compiled a list of 10 excellent films about filmmaking, all of which are currently available on Netflix Instant. Now that I’ve taken all of the guesswork out of figuring out what to watch, grab some hot cocoa (or spiked egg nog), throw on your Snuggie, and settle in for two days worth of awesome filmmaking movies. More »

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netflix main iconLast week, Ted Sarandos, the Chief Content Officer of Netflix, ruffled a few feathers with NATO (um National Association of Theatre Owners, that is) when he gave a keynote address at the Film Independent Forum about how theater owners are strangling the lifeblood of the movies. On top of the pretty interesting points, he broke down just how filmmakers can join the Netflix revolution and make your own show into the next Orange is the New Black. More »

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Netflix 4KThe timetable for TVs adopting 4K has been up for debate since the 4K’s adoption rates began to rise themselves. Some look at the lagging success of 3D TVs as an indicator that not all consumers treat new technologies equally. However, with more and more TVs offering 4K, it might signify that in-home 4K viewing will become the norm. In fact, the fast-becoming in-home media viewing standard, Netflix, has started testing several 4K videos and even has plans to start offering 4K content as early as next year. More »

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netflix-originalsIt’s safe to say that Netflix took the world by storm with its first original series, House of Cards. Not only was the show immaculately produced, shot, and acted, but it also may have planted the seeds for an entertainment revolution in that it signaled the beginning of a shift away from traditional media outlets towards online streaming services. Today we got word that original series might just be the tip of the iceberg for Netflix, whose content boss said that original movies could be a reality for the company very soon. If this is the case, and Netflix starts taking on a studio-like role in the film world, what would the implications be for independent filmmakers? Let’s take a look: More »

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piratingIt looks as though media pirating information is becoming more and more relevant to distribution and content rights holders. We’ve talked before about how Netflix monitors torrent activity to find out what’s popular amongst moviegoers, and Netflix CEO Reed Hastings had some interesting things to say about how the allure of free movies might be overshadowed by ease of use. An article from The Verge explores yet another dimension of the piracy discourse: availability of content. How does the availability of certain films affect illegal downloading, and how will this change the future of distribution? More »

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NetflixMedia piracy has been a thorny issue ever since the turn of the century. The Information Age giving rise to P2P file sharing services like Napster, LimeWire, and BitTorrent, and gave users instant access to their favorite music and other media for free, challenging the 1998 DMCA. The entertainment industry seems to have largely taken a solid position against piracy, but what if piracy information is used to choose the programming of a paid service? Netflix recently shared that they take this data into account in their content development strategy, adding yet another dimension in the anti/pro piracy debate. More »

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vimeo-e1378182278821Vimeo has long been known for the quality of their video, and has become a haven for filmmakers who want a higher quality upload than is available from other video sites. Now they are experimenting with a new platform whereby filmmakers who debut their films at the Toronto Film Festival this week are eligible for $10,000 in funding if they distribute through Vimeo On Demand, the site’s online distribution channel launched in March earlier this year. Click below to check out this new platform and see what it could mean for indie filmmakers. More »

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Video thumbnail for youtube video Buffering Bummer: Are Bitter Broadband Providers Handicapping Netflix & YouTube? - nofilmschoolIt’s probably no surprise to anyone that Netflix and YouTube dominate the domain of web video. Any video viewer is also probably used to watching those please wait, buffering circles go ’round while waiting for their videos to load. Tuning in to such sites during peak hours, it’s no wonder why video can take a while to buffer, right? According to a recent post by Ars Technica, there’s a bit more to buffering (read: suffering) than what may be immediately obvious. The real bummer is that web video doesn’t have to be so slow, at least in some cases. But, due to disagreements between ISPs and major media services, sometimes it is. More »

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Arrested DevelopmentBang the drums and sound the shofar: Arrested Development is back after 7 long years. All 15 new episodes were released on Netflix and like many of you — I binged. Oh — I binged hard. After watching the entire 4th season, all 15 episodes, every one of the 489 minutes in one sitting (as it was created to be experienced), I must admit that it wasn’t easy. It wasn’t fatigue or a fast depleting attention span that made it difficult either, but a new and very intriguing storytelling method employed by the AD team. So, as a survivor, I came up with a few things to consider if you’re planning on taking on the 8+hour Bluth Binge. More »

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While the phenomenon of title evaporation is nothing new to Netflix, one of the service’s most significant catalog losses will come with the expiration of licensing agreements with Warner Bros., Universal, and MGM. Starting today and continuing over the course of May, InstantWatcher tracks 1,794 previously available films that will no longer be streamed on Netflix. This news piggy-backs that of Warner Archive Instant, an offering that — very literal title notwithstanding — should be quite familiar to Netflix viewers. Click below for details on what perennial picks will be removed from the Netflix catalog, some additional info on Warner’s Archive Instant, plus what Netflix itself has to say about all this as well. More »

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Consumer viewing habits are changing, and companies like Netflix are at the forefront of the streaming revolution. So it comes as no surprise that they also plan to be at the bleeding edge when it comes to 4K. Netflix’s Chief Product Officer, Neil Hunt, recently stated in an interview that they expect to have 4K streaming within a year or two, with their original series House of Cards (shot on the RED EPIC) eventually getting 4K encodings. While it’s good news for anyone selling a 4K TV, is there a way independent filmmakers could benefit from all of this? More »

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On February 1st, Netflix released the first 13 episodes of the first season of House of Cards, marking a potentially monumental shift in the way we watch content. By now it’s very likely a number of you have seen the entirety of the series starring Kevin Spacey. While it’s not the first original series for Netflix (that would be Lilyhammer), House of Cards is one of the most (if not the most) expensive television shows in history, and has attracted some of the biggest names in Hollywood — like director David Fincher. But will the experiment work, or will binge-viewing ultimately hurt those who produce content? More »

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If you thought 4K was a buzzword at last year’s NAB, it was the real deal at CES this year. All of the manufacturers were out in force, and not just camera makers — everyone who makes a screen had a 4K display at the show. There were a couple interesting developments so far that might actually mean 4K comes to your home sooner rather than later, including much cheaper 4K TVs from Westinghouse, Netflix streaming a video in 4K at the show itself, and a 4K Windows 8 tablet from Panasonic. RED was also in attendance at CES, showing off their new tech and playing videos in their new highly-compressed but high-quality .RED format. Check out all of the latest developments below. More »

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Netflix is undeniably a bargain for consumers. The variety of content it features is immense, even though instant viewing choices fluctuate somewhat frustratingly — but don’t expect the average consumer to be understanding about the rather ugly licensing problems that cause this. It’s hard to argue with the price, despite Netflix’s problems. The removal of its native social component, splitting DVD/streaming subscriptions, its sensory overload/option paralysis layout, and its lame payouts to creators are all issues to take with the service. That said, anyone who appreciates the engineering behind modern content delivery can respect Netflix’s ease of viewing — possible via multi-device integration, and, more vitally, the number of encodings each video must undergo for that famous ‘instant view’ ability. More »

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For its future as a streaming only service, Netflix is reliant on deals with content owners, a situation which has the service being described aptly as a castle on quicksand. As evidence of its constantly-changing library, Netflix recently lost Starz content but today added Dreamworks Animation films to their library. However, Amazon also doubled their Prime library today (which at $79/year — including an unlimited free two-day shipping tie-in — compares favorably to Netflix’s $96 annual fee). Competition is heating up, but I can’t help but note one other thing about Netflix: the design of their website and most of their apps is, and always has been, mediocre at best. Which is to say nothing of the connection between the service’s benefit to consumers and its detriment to content creators. More »