» Posts Tagged ‘nikond800’

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FilmConvert Standalone Version 1.047During the NAB 2013 show, FilmConvert, the film emulation color grading program/plugin that actually maps color profiles to specific film stocks, was updated with support for the Blackmagic Cinema Camera, GoPro HERO3, Canon 7D, and 60D, as well as newer profiles for the Canon 5D Mark II and Mark III. Now, in the newest update, they’ve added the Panasonic GH3, Nikon D800 and D7000, in addition to the Canon T2i/T3i. Read on for more about the update, including a new ability to apply film color and contrast separately. More »

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The Nikon D600 is currently the only full-frame camera in its price range to offer uncompressed HDMI, but a huge issue prevented it from being usable — that is, until now. Nikon has just released a firmware update that corrects the HDMI output, and instead of only filling 95% of the screen, it will now fill 100%. While many were hopeful the update would also include a fix for the ability to change the aperture in live view, that doesn’t seem to be the case. Nikon also released updates for the Nikon D800 and a number of other cameras, so click through for more details and links to the downloads. More »

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Canon obviously got off to an early start in Hollywood thanks to the incredible performance of the Canon 5D Mark II and the fact that the camera could be put literally anywhere. It really wasn’t until the introduction early last year of the Nikon D800 that there was a bigger push to incorporate Nikon DSLRs into larger productions. Some of this is attributed to the fact that the Nikon cameras didn’t have full manual controls in video mode until their newest cameras, but the other reason they haven’t really taken hold is because the image quality just wasn’t very good until the D800. Now we’ve got people like DP Janusz Kamiński shooting with the cameras, and it’s being used on shows like Dexter and Wilfred. More »

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Canon has had an ongoing relationship with industry professionals like Shane Hurlbut and Vincent Laforet, but now it seems Nikon is getting in on the action, calling on frequent Steven Spielberg Director of Photography Janusz Kamiński to shoot, and Guillermo Arriaga, writer/director of The Burning Plain and writer of Amores Perros, 21 Grams, and Babel, to direct a horror film shot only with the Nikon D800. This is a big step for Nikon, who has lagged behind the rest of the DSLR video world until this generation of cameras. More »

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We’ve already speculated about the future of Nikon and their plans for a cinema camera, but there is an interesting rumor circulating that Nikon is planning to move their service center in El Segundo, CA once the lease is up in a few months. Why does this matter? Well the word is that they will be moving to a new site right in Hollywood, and this would no doubt be a direct response to the Canon Professional Technology and Support Center. If that does happen, what might it mean for filmmakers, and what does Nikon need to do to compete with Canon, Sony, and Panasonic in the video world? More »

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There have been some developments in the m43 world as of late. The new Voigtlander 17.5mm f0.95 lens was recently released along with a hands-on video by Seb Farges, the Olympus OM-D E-M5 takes on the Nikon D800 in a new shootout, and Gabriel Verdugo has been toiling to create a GH2 that uses a Polaroid lens: More »

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Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you know that Nikon has been pushing video extremely hard with their latest DSLRs, the Nikon D4 and the Nikon D800, and at least in the case of the D800, they’ve got a worthy competitor on their hands. Somehow the D4 didn’t get the sharpness of the D800, but it still got full, clean HDMI that can be recorded using a number of external devices to get a better codec like ProRes. If you’re curious, that’s not a real photo to the left. It’s what would happen if the D800 and the C300 had a full frame 35mm video camera child. Far-fetched? Maybe not. More »

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The candlelight test that got an enormous amount feedback has returned. After a bit of a delay between this one and the last one (thanks in part to the craziness that is NAB), I thought it would make sense to really level the playing field between the two cameras since the exposure for the D800 is slightly brighter at equivalent ISOs. I’ve also done a little bit of color correction and noise reduction, and the results are certainly interesting compared to the last video. The test is embedded below, but be sure to go to Vimeo and download it in 1080p for the highest possible quality. More »

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Audio recording internally to DSLRs has been mediocre at best. It’s great for scratch audio when you’re doing dual-system sound, but for the most part, it’s a real pain. I’ve been testing the 5D Mark III and the D800, but one of the tests I wasn’t able to do as thoroughly as I wanted was to test the internal audio recording of both cameras with a proper microphone. I know that many out there would ask why you’d ever plug directly into the DSLR without some other external preamp box, but sometimes (like at NAB), having the least amount of equipment that can fail is best. I met Dave Dugdale at NAB, and in this video he takes the time to test out both the Nikon D800 and the Canon 5D Mark III for the quality of their internal audio recordings. More »

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Well it’s taking a bit longer to get these up than I’d hoped, but I think the evidence in this one is the most obvious of any test I’ve seen so far. This time the Canon 5D Mark II has been thrown into the mix, in addition to the 5D Mark III and the Nikon D800. We were in a room with large windows well into the night, and so there are a couple streetlights providing very basic illumination at the higher ISOs. Other than that the only light is the candle right in front of our model Sasha. More »

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During pre-production for the narrative film that I am shooting as a companion piece to the 5D Mark III and D800 test, which is now on part 3, we decided to see the entire ISO range of both cameras and see how well they handled under and overexposure. I wanted to see how the internal codecs would stand up to this extreme test, so both cameras were set to the variable bitrate 28mbps codecs in the camera. The lenses were kept the same  – the best of the best from both Canon and Nikon, the 70-200mm f/2.8, with the Canon being the newer version of that lens. More »

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Monday we talked in-depth about the 5D Mark III, and today we’ve got the D800. Nikon definitely surprised a lot of people with this one, and it’s interesting that Canon didn’t really see them coming – or they are afraid to hurt their higher end sales (which could include a possible 4K camera priced below the C300). Either way, you can’t go wrong with clean 4:2:2 HDMI out of the Nikon D800, and still photographs which rival medium-format backs costing $20,000 or more. So let’s get down to it. More »

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The thought occurred to me that the picture to the left is a little boring, and it would be far more interesting to have an animated GIF of sorts with both cameras turning to each other and butting lenses as if they were American football linemen. Kidding aside, I have been using both the Nikon D800 and the Canon 5D Mark III for a couple days now and I am coming to a few interesting conclusions that I need to explore in the coming days. I already talked about my testing plans before, but the idea is that since some of these edits will be time-intensive, the test will roll out in parts over the next couple weeks, culminating in a short film. More »

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I’ve seen a lot of videos with footage from the 5D Mark III, but not as many with the D800. Most tests are either pretty outdoor scenes, or quick clips showing the improvements over the previous generation. These are certainly welcome, as they can help people decide on a pre-order or a purchase. For that reason, they are a necessary evil (or they can be a lot of fun for gear-heads). Part of writing in this community is having to wade through the dozens, if not hundreds of tests and videos, and it can obviously get a little tedious. More »

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Rather than a new post for every single new video featuring Canon 5D Mark III or Nikon D800 footage, it made a lot of sense to do a weekend roundup of all of the videos we haven’t covered here yet. Some of you are tired of hearing about these cameras, so I really feel like this is the best of both worlds. We don’t have any major tests yet, as the cameras aren’t quite in people’s hands, but if you’re still holding off on a purchase there will be plenty of solid tests coming up in the next few weeks. More »

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Just as I was writing about the possible new features of Magic Lantern Unified, it’s been confirmed that the replacement for the Canon 5D Mark II will be announced on February 28th. Does this make me any less excited about Magic Lantern? Absolutely not! This next Canon camera will not be for everyone, and there’s a major hurdle for plenty of people: price. Let’s look at the confirmed specs so far.
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This is a post by Joe Marine… much more to come from Joe soon. Stay tuned!

Nikon’s new D800 will be put through its paces soon enough (we hope), but until then we’ve got some moderately compressed videos to pixel peep. I find it curious that these official company videos always seem more compressed than they ought to be – as if to entice more speculation – but that’s a topic for another post. In any case, this music video, directed by Morten Rygaard and produced by Peter Brodin at Nikon Nordic, gives us a small taste of D800 quality: More »

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Is the just-announced Nikon D800 the new Canon 5D Mark II? It’s full frame, it’s of a similar size and it’s of a similar price, but it offers a clean HDMI output, and it does 60p (at 720p). The question, I guess, is not how the D800 will fair against the 5D Mark II but how it will compare the Mark III — whenever we hear about that. Thanks to reader Paul, here’s the first (to my knowledge) short film shot on the new D800: More »

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The new Nikon D4 isn’t the only new kid on the block — Nikon will also be releasing a second full-frame DSLR, the Nikon D800. As rumored, the D800 has a whopping 36 megapixel CMOS sensor (7360 x 4912 resolution), which may make the D800 not seem optimal for video (smaller photosites). However, the camera features full 1080p HD video at 30/24fps and 720p at 60fps. Similar to the D4, the D800 will also offer a clean HDMI output — except the D800 is half the price of the D4, coming in at $2,999. More »