June 26, 2014

New Nikon D810 DSLR Adds 1080P 60FPS & Other Video Features, But Not 4K

Even though Nikon was the first DSLR out of the gate with 24p video, it was Canon that really made a splash with the Mark II not long after. Nikon tried to get back some of that market with the D800 and D4 aimed at video shooters, and now they are pushing even harder with the new D810, which adds 1080p 60fps, higher ISO capabilities, and simultaneous recording to both internal cards and an external recorder. While there is a big push to add 4K recording to these kinds of cameras, neither the newer D4s nor the new D810 have it.

Here is the product tour:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JjLGrGx6pA4

And here is Nikon's promo film, followed by the making-of:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ij3GpCNgYZk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0Blna7AJaA

From The Verge, here are some of the other video improvements:

For one, Nikon is introducing a flat video profile, which should make coloring footage much easier for shooters to do in post. The D810 is also able to display zebra stripes while filming, helping the camera operator tell whether or not a shot is properly exposed. The new camera also includes two microphones on the front, allowing it to record in stereo rather than mono, and those capturing audio with an external mic will be able to split the recording into a separate wide range and voice range.

Even though some Nikon cameras don't allow changing certain functions while in Live View, the D810 (and D800 before it) does not have these limitations, and is adding another interesting feature:

The D810 is able to film in an auto ISO mode that still allows for manual control over aperture and shutter speed, letting those two factors stay locked down while the camera adjusts to changes in lighting. Nikon says the transition between ISO should happen smoothly too.

Here are the specs:

  • 36.3MP FX-Format CMOS Sensor
  • No Optical Low Pass Filter
  • 3.2" 1,229k-Dot LCD
  • 1920 x 1080: 60 fps, 30 fps, 24 fps, 50 fps, 25 fps
  • 1280 x 720: 60 fps, 50 fps
  • 5 fps Continuous Shooting in FX Mode
  • ISO: Auto, 64-12800 (High Sensitivity Mode: 32-51200)
  • CompactFlash & SD/SDHC/SDXC
  • Multi-CAM 3500FX AF Sensor w/ 51 Points
  • Electronic Front Curtain Shutter
  • 1/8" Headphone & 1/8" Microphone
  • HDMI C (Mini) & USB 3.0
  • Availability: July 2014
  • Price: $3,300 Body Only

And some more videos showing off the camera:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ec3mg8_4TZ4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnxXsWEChe8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Wj_vHf1CDg

Nikon added some minor updates to the D4s, and they've done much of the same with the D810, though many of the updates are important for video shooters. Being able to record internally to the cards and externally to a recorder is huge since the D800 could only do one or the other, and not both. While it shouldn't really affect video too much, the D810 also takes after the D800E by not having a low pass filter (though Nikon's solution was a little more complicated than that). The ability to have zebras while shooting is also helpful, and even though Nikon allowed you to create picture profiles and load them onto the camera in the past, having a log profile built-in is great.

Image quality may have a slight improvement, but for the most part the footage doesn't seem to look too different from the D800. Back in 2012 when I took a look at both the Canon 5D Mark III and the Nikon D800, it was clear that the Nikon had the edge in sharpness, even though the Mark III was far better in low light. Nikon has added a stop of ISO capability to the high end (up to 12,800), and another stop (up to 51,200) in the expanded ISO from the D800 which maxed out at 6400 and 25,000 in expanded mode. We'll have to wait and see though how much of an improvement this actually is in video mode.

While you may not need 4K, the tide is certainly heading in that direction, so it's interesting that Nikon still hasn't tried to include it in any of their higher-end cameras. I did not expect them to have it in the D4s, and while they have mentioned that they are looking into 4K, they seem to be a rather slow-moving company, so it may take a few more models before we see higher resolutions. Nikon has also introduced higher-end features into lower-end cameras, so it would not surprise me if a far cheaper camera got 4K first.

Link: Nikon D810 -- B&H

[via Nikon Rumors & The Verge]

Your Comment

103 Comments

meh..

June 26, 2014 at 5:49PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Agreed... Meh - To late as always Nikon, and for the price it will still be that old excuse "but its still a camera for photographers" bla bla blaaaaaa

June 26, 2014 at 5:59PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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According to rumors I've seen Nikon has some kind of 4K video camera coming out at some big media show in the fall. Hopefully it won't cost an arm and a leg and will have clean output and no time limit. I will buy at least one immediately if that is the case. I'd like to keep my arms and legs though..........

June 26, 2014 at 10:30PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene, the Gene ...

+1

June 26, 2014 at 6:59PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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jaye

I would pick 60p 1080p over 4k 24p any day. Yeah 4k looks glorious and what not, but it comes down to the content and the edit of what you're producing. 4k 60p would be DOPE

June 26, 2014 at 5:52PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Frogy

is it just me or this camera is like 3 years behind?

June 26, 2014 at 6:18PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Edry

Exactly. This sort of announcement would have been exciting in, say, 2011-2012.

June 26, 2014 at 9:50PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Swissted

You mean when the D800 came out being the first to have uncompressed 422 out with audio?? Or the first to have a mic input??

Your all like a flock of sparrows that change direction at the slightest gust. To belittle this camera before hardly seeing any footage says a lot about some.

And Gene, 4K is a gimmick to sell TVs just as 3D was. We know this because NOBODY in production or the viewing audience asked for it. Have a good think about that. Did a single viewer at home say "Hmmm this Blueray is HD but its just not HD enough for me"???

Its purely another way to push TVs and they learnt that trick from 3D and followed it right away with 4K. Sure there are 4K cameras but loot around at who is pushing them. Major TV manufacturers Sony with the A7s and other cams, Panasonic pushing the GH4.

Its not rocket science.

June 27, 2014 at 1:27AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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What is the reason ARRI has a 4K camera in development due out in less than a year?

June 27, 2014 at 2:24AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene, the tryin...

I heard an Arri rep say it was a 6K camera on a podcast. Thats different. Its a different market and competes with the F65. I think he said it was also going to be 70mm. The big players wanting to retain DPs with uber cameras is different from 4K marketing.

June 27, 2014 at 2:47AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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4K is a sales gimmick, 6K is different.

Why not just let the angst about 4K go and enjoy it?

June 28, 2014 at 12:16AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene,,

It's hard to predict what Arri will do. Going Open Gate, pushes 4k. From what I'm hearing, 6k is their next step. Only time will tell.

June 29, 2014 at 11:02AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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RidingtheDragon

It seems they would go 6K to compete with the Red Dragon.

They are probably already R&D-ing 8K.

June 29, 2014 at 4:48PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Enjoying Some G...

Slight gust... I don't think you can call the A7S a slight gust. It is a very dramatic change in performance when it comes to video vs the 'old guard' of Nikon and Canon DSLRs. The D810 is merely the old guard reheated in a microwave.

June 27, 2014 at 10:39AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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I agree the A7s is a good step up and I'm thinking about one as my B cam because of its size and weight combined with slog2.

But that doesnt mean a bunch of people need to come here and for no reason knock an upgrade to whats already a very good camera.

The dual mic inputs are another industry first for Nikon and now users of the D810 can have a shotgun mic in one input and a radio mic on the other at the same time. Thats a really good feature.

June 27, 2014 at 8:40PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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SO, SO TRUE:

"Your all like a flock of sparrows that change direction at the slightest gust. To belittle this camera before hardly seeing any footage says a lot about some."

June 27, 2014 at 11:26AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Erin

We did see footage. Look above at the videos.

June 28, 2014 at 12:17AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene,,

They are heavily compressed and soft. We can't use those to judge the camera.

June 28, 2014 at 12:39AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Ok, but heck, they're on Nikon's YouTube channel so they thought they were good stuff for promoting the camera.

June 28, 2014 at 1:44AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene,,

Yeah, 1080p video is about that old.

And the difference between 1080p and 4K is noticable to everyone, even anti-4K trolls. I think that's why we haven't read "4k is a sales gimmick and is going the way of 3D tvs" in a while--them trolls can't make that spaghetti stick to the wall anymore.

I love the Nikon color palette. The colors in the Dream video are beautiful, very pleasant to look at. But no 4K, and the 20 minute limit ruins it. I think their main sales come from still photography shooters anyway. If Nikon would just take up the task of developing a 4K video camera with that wonderful color palette, and unlimited recording time, I think they'd find a good market. Wish upon a star.

June 26, 2014 at 10:26PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene, the Gene ...

I won't argue 4K is a gimmick, but I personally still strongly stand behind what I've said for a long time, I'd rather have a 1080p 10bit RAW 4:4:4, than 4K- and yeah if properly shot and handled you wouldn't see a degradation in quality from normal viewing distances.

That aside though, unfortunately this is a useless upgrade, but then, even when Nikon debuted the first HD DSLR and first clean HDMI out they never really pushed towards video because that isn't what the company is about. They are a stills company. You see Nikon's used for video on small things, not projects as an 'A' camera.
Gotta say though, whining over the 20 minute recording time is weak. I've never once been in, or worked with anyone who has been in, a situation where it was a problem, and that's ranging from low to high end productions; BTS to small features, and music videos. It would be nice to never be concerned with the limit, but it's hardly a thorn in your side. If it is such an issue, than a DSLR in general is probably not the right tool for the job.

June 27, 2014 at 1:17AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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kurt

Whining? If you're live streaming a live 3 hour event and want to record it for upload to YouTube, and to be burned to DVD's, well, 20 minutes won't work. That's the math I learned in America.

Yeah, there's a big world out there. Lots of needs for cameras go WAY beyond 20 minutes. I suppose you could convince women to keep their weddings to 20 minutes. "Um maam, my camera only records for 20 minutes. Make it snappy. No time for those tears. Suck it up!" There. Easy as pie. ;^)

June 27, 2014 at 2:13AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene, the tryin...

If I am streaming a 3 hour live event, no way am I using any dslr. For all practical purposes dslrs don't need to record over 20 min. I have used Nikon, canon, and other dslrs for video/film projects - it's about the right tool for the right job.

June 27, 2014 at 3:21AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Steve

Why on earth would you want to do a live stream using dslrs?!

June 27, 2014 at 11:29AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Erin

Why not?? And camera with a clean output can, and should, be used for live streaming. Why have separate cameras for this and then that? Some don't have big budgets. And the GH's make an excellent picture.

June 28, 2014 at 12:20AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene,,

Steve

most people don't have a wide variety of "tools". If a camera has a clean output, and won't shut itself off after 20 or 30 minutes of recording, BANG, it's suitable for live streaming. :-)

With the internal grading of most cameras they all can be graded to output beautiful images to view live. I can't see a reason why DSLR's and mirrorless cameras can't be used for live streaming---unless they have that blasted 30 minute record time. You can even use $29.00 web cams for live streaming. Just can't record with them. But then you can use a full screen recorder for that.

June 28, 2014 at 12:26AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene,,

Steve on 06.27.14 @ 3:21AM

"For all practical purposes dslrs don’t need to record over 20 min."

Weddings are recorded on DSLR's all the time. A friend of mine did one a couple months ago. Great work too: http://vimeo.com/92310716

Too bad this D810 has the 30 minute limit. Its image is perfect for weddings.

June 28, 2014 at 1:22AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene,,

I suppose you could convince women to keep their weddings to 20 minutes. "Um maam, my camera only records for 20 minutes. Make it snappy. No time for those tears. Suck it up!"

Are you saying you shoot live broadcast weddings? Wow.

October 25, 2014 at 9:30AM

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What matters is color and motion and dynamic range and resolution and highlight and shadow handling. These four things are all equally important. If you compromise one, you compromise your image. So in the race to 4k, you hurt your camera's color fidelity - that's not good for me. Read John Galt from Panavision's speech on this matter - super informative.

June 27, 2014 at 11:16AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Maybe if it were a camcorder, but as a stills camera, which people seem to be forgetting that it is, it's well up-to-date.

June 27, 2014 at 8:03AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Pat

These are great stills cameras though

June 26, 2014 at 6:27PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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john jeffries

Yeah, this looks like it would be great for a photographer who occasionally shoots a little video.

June 26, 2014 at 6:56PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Sean K

It does. But the color looks so good I am wishing Nikon would make a video camera with no recording limit.

June 28, 2014 at 7:19AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene,,

Nikon uses Sony sensors and in part Sony limits their use for certain features , such as 60p

The only camera I would see with 4k would be 5200 and 7100 series because they use Toshiba sensors , its mainly politics but at same time Nikon seems a lil slow also

Which is a shame because the Sony d800 and Toshiba sensor dynamic range are two of top in the game behind only the hassleblad in terms of stills

June 26, 2014 at 7:05PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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jaye

Does anyone know the data rate of the video codec? Why do they not publish this? It's currently THE SINGLE most important spec of the DSLR as regards video image quality.

June 26, 2014 at 8:42PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Proudly Warbler

Not true, it isn't the single most important factor. For one, codec efficiency matters a whole lot more! Along with a bunch more factors.

June 26, 2014 at 11:43PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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David - Could you cite examples of efficient low bit rate codecs that out perform encoding at higher data rates?

June 27, 2014 at 1:21AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Proudly Warbler

H264 vs Panasonic P2 (P2 noisy garbage)

June 27, 2014 at 1:30AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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You are comparing different cameras, not different codecs jackass

June 27, 2014 at 7:18AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Terppa Teuvonen

Where did I mention a camera genius??? The subject we are talking about is codec efficiency. How could you miss that?

June 27, 2014 at 7:44AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gents - I still think that currently bit rate is "the single most important spec of the DSLR" as far as IQ goes. Presently, in 2014, codec efficiency is more or less a constant and that's because most DSLR codecs are based on H.264. Also, when broadcasters specify minimum delivery standards (e.g., 30 Mbps inter-frame for news; 50 Mbps inter-frame for long-form programing), they DO NOT specify codec efficiency. Codec efficacy is assumed.

H.264 comes in many flavors and supports different bit rates. But, it underlies many of the encoders from Canon, Nikon, Sony, and Panasonic with the exception, for example, of Sony's XAVC and XAVC S. What varies is the bit rate. Look at the Magic Lantern hacks of the Canon DSLRs. One of the ways in which ML improves IQ is by bumping up the original bit rate of 30-50 Mbps to +70 Mbps.

The GH3 shoots inter-frame at 50 Mbps; GH4 at 100 Mbps. The Canon 7D, an ancient DSLR dating back to 2009, is still a video imaging powerhouse because it's variable bit rate encoder operates at up to 48 Mbps and outperforms brand new cameras from Sony that shoot AVCHD (which is based on H.264) at 24 Mbps. This is especially true when the 7D shoots complex motion like breaking surf, tree leaves, etc., where the image changes significantly from frame to frame.

Mbps is a key spec. If a manufacturer is going to publish ANY spec about a camera body used for video capture, it needs to tell us the bit rate of the encoder. Maybe this will change once 100 Mbps inter-frame becomes the standard for everything from pocket cameras to FF DSLRs but it's not the case today. We still live in a world where 24 Mbps produces muddy images for complex scenes while 50 Mbps works quite well. We need to know whether a camera like the D810 falls into the former or the later category.

June 27, 2014 at 1:23PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Proudly Warbler

The D7000, D800, and D600 were all 24mb/s, I imagine this one is no different.

D7000: MOV, H.264/MPEG-4 Advanced Video Cording
>http://www.nikon.com/news/2010/0915_d7000_02.htm

"By using the B frame data compression method, you can record 1080p Full HD video at 30p in H.264/MPEG-4 AVC format with unmatched moving image integrity for up to approx. 29 min. 59 s* of recording in a single clip."
>http://imaging.nikon.com/lineup/dslr/d800/features02.htm

June 27, 2014 at 2:24AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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20 and 30 minute limits on video, make me laugh

June 26, 2014 at 10:19PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene, the Gene ...

There is no limit on the uncompressed HDMI out.

June 27, 2014 at 2:49AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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...because you're not recording in-camera. You're just recording the HDMI feed. The camera itself has a limit.

June 27, 2014 at 8:16AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Pat

We know but I was just pointing out that via HDMI you can record indefinitely so DSLRs dont need to be thought of as restricted in that way.

June 27, 2014 at 8:53AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Yes they do. When I need a separate device to capture my video, you start to lose some of the advantages of a DSLR (size, portability, etc).

Moreover, its embarassing to put a 20min limit on it when things like Magic Lantern show those are just arbitrary marketing decisions. If the D810 is supposed to win over the video community, time limits would be the first thing to go

June 27, 2014 at 10:08AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Chris

The thing is this camera makes beautiful video. It's just a shame it has limits on the time.

An external recorder adds huge cost. I want to use Nikon cameras for live streaming because I love the color palette and image characteristics.

I'm still hoping the rumored Nikon 4K video camera will have clean output and no recording limit. The Nikon V1 has 4K bursts. It's not a big technological step to make it into a full blow 4K video recorder with unlimited time.

June 28, 2014 at 12:32AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene,,

If only you produced as much video content as you do trolling of web forums, you would have probably bemn able to afford a proper video camera by now.

June 28, 2014 at 5:03AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Jerry Simon

Please explain how I am trolling.

June 28, 2014 at 7:01AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene,,

Jerry Gene is entitled to an opinion. Its the ones earlier that purely came to bag Nikon without I'll bet ever touching one that are the trolls.

June 28, 2014 at 7:10AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Thanks Simon.

June 28, 2014 at 7:12AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene,,

Wall Street Journal basically accused the Nikon management of incompetence this week. D810 seems like one of those, "OK, we'll do it if we must" updates - an early summer release while everyone is getting ready for the PhotoKina in September. Hypothetically speaking, a 16.2 MP DF type sensor in a D810 body should work fine for a moderately priced 4K cam. Then they can offer a 6K model with the 24 MP D610 type sensor in a DX4 body. These days, most of the software and hardware is available off the shelf anyway. The engineering part involves putting the package together without really inventing a whole lot.

June 27, 2014 at 12:41AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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DLD

Yes, 6K is on the way. Nikon not going to 4K is as odd as Canon not going to 60fps. But 4K and slomo are just sales gimmicks...... It could be they want the D800 line to be for stills with incidental video uses and they have another line that will have 4K video.

But I whine. ;^)

June 27, 2014 at 2:20AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene, the tryin...

Why anyone would choose this for video over the Sony A7s is beyond me. The Sony is $800 cheaper and offers video features that blow this out of the water. Not to mention full sensor read out which I can guarantee the D810 does not - add to that s-log and 50mbps and the Nikon is simply a joke...for video.

Such a sad company really...

June 27, 2014 at 12:51AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Paul

You do know they are primarily a stills camera company not to mention that the current D800 has blown away anything DSLR from Canon since its release. So calling Nikon a sad company is a bit harsh.

The current D800 is about the best stills camera you can buy.

June 27, 2014 at 1:34AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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^what he said

June 27, 2014 at 3:34AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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South of JHB

You can't argue with the slaves of corporate marketing.

June 27, 2014 at 11:33AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Erin

They tried using Nikon as crash cams on Fury Road. They consistently stopped functioning. The 5Ds were chosen and survived.

June 29, 2014 at 11:12AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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cameraman

D810 vs 5d3 clip on youtube, skip to 3.15 for the best comparison.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PDrUlZYvgdE

Why would someone buy it? Well shooting at 64 iso in a flat profile while retaining dynamic range at 60fps and recording 42mbps internally or 8 bit 422 doesn't sound too bad. Every camera has a niche and with class leading 36mp still images I'm sure the D810 will do just fine.

June 27, 2014 at 1:49AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Marco

I agree they are good features but that comparison video I don't believe is real. Nikons are notoriously hard to get hold of before they are on the shelves usually with a few months wait time and never within one day of the announcement.

Its just someone looking for youtube views.

June 27, 2014 at 2:54AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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If the flat profile retains all the DR that the sensor has, a D810 with external recording will be one mighty camera. It's the single most important, simplest feature that any manufacturer could add to their DSLRs (except Canon, who doesn't have that much DR even in RAW stills).

June 27, 2014 at 4:05AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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It will probably not have better video than the a7s, but it would be my choice for people wanting the best stills camera first, and a good video camera second. If the profile is really wide and retains those lovely 14 stops of DR that the sensor can offer, that is.

June 27, 2014 at 4:18AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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I love when people who are only concerned with gear specs argue over why a new stills camera isn't the greatest new video camera.

June 27, 2014 at 8:18AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Pat

+1 On this site most actual camera (non-DSLR) news doesn't get much attention.

June 27, 2014 at 8:57AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Well, this is a video update for the camera. On the stills side, it added a few arbitrary ISO settings, made the LCD a little higher res, and has a few firmware tweaks...otherwise its just a D800E. All the new features are for the video side (simultaneous recording, zebras, log profile, etc), thus the critique. Turns out the D800 has been capable of those things all along, and by not releasing them when they released the D800, they kind of made this update seem silly.

If I have a D800/D800E, I;m not upgrading. And if I didnt switch over from my current system to a D800/D800E, there's not anything in particular here that is a "must-have" that would make me switch

June 27, 2014 at 10:15AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Chris

It would have been easy for Nikon to take off the 20 and 30 minute limits. Sony and Panasonic see the demand for video. Nikon and Canon are slow to the bell.

June 28, 2014 at 12:37AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene,,

They could easily do it but we might have to pay more in import taxes as they would be classed as video cameras.

June 28, 2014 at 12:45AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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That's Europe, not America. Europe can have their limits. Not here!!

June 28, 2014 at 1:39AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene,,

No 4k on a stills camera? Oh be still my beating heart!

You know how many stills cameras offer 4k? Four. Four stills cameras offer 4k. Panasonic GH4, Panasonic FZ1000, Sony A7s, and Canon 1d-C. The A7s doesn't even do it internally.

There are less than 30 cameras that do 4k video, so quit your whining you impatient bastards.

June 27, 2014 at 12:10PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Bertzie

You missed the rumored, if not yet announced, Panasonic LX8 and Samsung NX1. But, in 2-3 months, there'll be a ton more hybrids offering 4K.
.
In any case, I am trying to understand the needs for this camera. If you're staring from scratch, would you pay $3,300 for it? IMO, most people would go for GH4 if they are video minded, both for the budgetary and technical reasons. What if you already own Nikon lenses? Then it probably means you also own a Nikon body as well. Would you then upgrade your current D600/610 or 800/800E to 810? Most people would not. And the rate of technological advance means that the features found on this camera just don't provide a great value for the price.
.
That said, it seems to be off to a pretty good start on B&H.

June 27, 2014 at 1:45PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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DLD

There is my point again. Two new 4K cameras both made by major TV manufacturers!!! They are the only ones pushing 4K and thats why its the 3D push all over again.

I believe 4K will fail because production and broadcasters and even viewers never asked for it.

But I also believe we as production will all be better off because then the smoke clears in a few years we will all be left with cameras (already really) that can do really great HD. Proper HD, not DSLR resolution HD when down scaled from 4K.

Everyone wins. Unless you bought a 4K TV ;)

June 27, 2014 at 8:56PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Actually broadcast is quite keen on 8K. Just sayin'.
Even ESPN (who only just stopped broadcasting in 720P!) have geared their new studio for up to 8K. They know its coming. As do I : 4K will be a bump in the road to 6K+ cinema acquisition, and 8K broadcast pipe by the 2020 Olympics. Who knows: if the US ends up getting the 2022 WC after Qatar are bumped then you may have full 8K takeup across the board.

Testing is already underway.

As a former D800 owner, two things: I miss that camera a lot - the DR was lovely and the stills fantastic, and (b) a LOT of serious video journalism is shot with them.

/the Arri 4K/6K cam is being held up by the sales of the current 2K models. Think about that for a second.

June 27, 2014 at 9:46PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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marklondon

I agree about the D800 but I don't see any interest in 4K outside these forums and even then its usually people wanting better HD through a 4K cam or the younger newer shooters wanting 4K.

Even now in terms of broadcast switching and distribution gear there is almost nothing out there for 4K. Take a look at the Grass Valley site for example and there is nothing. I'm talking about the heavy end, I know Blackmagic have some switchers etc but they are small scale.

For broadcast even if ESPN are making such claims, for 4K to work all the networks need to be on board and all the stations. And in a declining market for networks they wont want to spend those kind of dollars re-kitting everything when its already heading for direct downloads. Netflicks, iTunes etc will have an easy time of it.

I just dont see how any network is even remotely contemplating 8K when there is only 1 8K camera being the F65 (unless I missed any new releases??)

June 27, 2014 at 11:48PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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"/the Arri 4K/6K cam is being held up by the sales of the current 2K models"

A confirming link please.

And is it true Red is quietly working on 8K?

June 28, 2014 at 12:45AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene,,

There's one 8K camera in Japan by NHK. There's also an experimental 8K monitor out by Sharp.
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Insofar as 4K goes, these days one can buy a Seiki 39" 4K TV/monitor for $389 while AOC 4K (pro spec?) 28" monitor is on the pre-order at Tiger Direct for $499. Netflix, Amazon and YouTube are offering 4K programming. Sony is advertising the heck out of the 4K at the World Cup (just look at the electric signage). Panasonic Z1000 is offering 4K 100 Mbps recording for $899. Several smartphones will also record in 4K. The technology to acquire and distribute the 4K footage has been here for a while. The technology to view 4K is getting cheaper and cheaper. Samsung is aiming to release a 60 cm (23.6") 4K monitor for $400 and a 40" TV for $1000. There's still premium over the Full HD sets but is fairly affordable for the entire middle class now. 4K DVD's are probably half a year away.

June 28, 2014 at 1:08AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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DLD

Funny that we're still arguing if 4K is catching on.

June 28, 2014 at 1:40AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene,,

The thing is its not catching on. Its being marketed like crazy and DLD I bet those smart phones you mentioned are from they same TV companies pushing the TVs??

Look at the core of the push and its the usual suspects.

As for the World Cup its just a vehicle for Sony to sell TVs. Its not even like they are broadcasting anywhere in 4K the matches. But to people sitting at home they don't know the difference. Some might even have gone out and bought a Sony 4K TV ready to watch that glorious.... HD broadcast!!

I wonder what will be next after this round of marketing. Smell-O-Vision!! Some monkey will develop a box for the TV that give a little squirt of some smell. Maybe it will start off with 8 or 10 smells each in a little container like one of those wall mounted deoderisers with the most common smells initially like grass, smoke, pine forrest, hooker, beer, pizza :) I want to see that movie!!

June 28, 2014 at 2:09AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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If it's only about marketing tvs then why did Red make a 4K camera? Why does Kineform have a 4K camera? And why is Red working on a 4K camera?

June 28, 2014 at 7:05AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene,,

Simon

only younger newer shooters want 4K? Lots of movies and tv show are done in 4K.

June 28, 2014 at 7:07AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene,,

correction,

why is ARRI working on a 4K camera?

June 28, 2014 at 7:10AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene,,

Yes to get a better HD image.

This is an article worth reading.

http://www.redsharknews.com/technology/item/1799-before-we-all-leap-into...

June 28, 2014 at 7:13AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Maybe for now that is the reason.

But ESPN is going to 4K broadcasting in the 1st qtr of next year. More channels will follow suit. 4K tvs are coming down in price very quickly. Soon they will be equal to 1080p tvs in cost. There already is 4K streaming on the internet. And it will gradually come to tv, but will cost an additional fee. Not everyone will pay the fee to get it. 4K dvd players will be out soon. 4K gaming is already available in some gaming consoles. 4K looks great rendered at 1080p, even better at 4K. There will be enough people who will want to go to 4K in every media they can to make those running the show very rich. 6K and 8K are next. 1080p is already looking dated. There's no looking back. The horse is waay out of the barn and is running away fast.

June 28, 2014 at 11:25AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene,,

I have to make one last comment.

If you follow the 180 degree rule which most do. It doesn't matter if its HD or 4, 8 or 16K the slightest amount of motion blur and there is no difference between the resolutions. I remember when Canon was pushing the C500 and 1DC and I went to a 4K screening and the only shots where you could see a difference between HD and 4K were when whatever it was you were meant to look at at the time didn't move at all. A teeny did of motion blur is all it takes to reduce 4K and above to HD.

Thats why all the 4K marketing videos are static scenes.

June 28, 2014 at 3:16AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Well, the increased details of 4K is obviously only a part of the current technological march forward. The color space is going 10-bit on the way to Rec. 2020 and the frame rate 48/60 fps on the road to 120. (there goes your motion blur)
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As to the TV manufacturers, when I was growing up, my grandparents had a 9" B&W TV (am I really that old or was the place where I lived hopelessly behind the times?). Since then, TV got bigger, better and cheaper. And don't forget the various monitors and tablets. If you think the TV folks are pushing it, a 40" 4K TV is only 100 Pixels Per Inch. A new 8" phablet with a 2560x1600 display is 557 Pixels Per Inch. And that's how it goes.
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BTW, 3D isn't dead either, especially if glass-free models take off.

June 28, 2014 at 4:01PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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DLD

3D is soooooo dead they wheeled the body out 2 years ago because it was stinking up the place.

I was in Nairobi this time last year (a place there is an incredible divide between the haves and have nots) and in a shopping centre there which I think was the one that was bombed a few months later, was a Sony store and they had a $20,000 4K TV, massive, anyhoo it was a year ago still years from the world ever having 4K let alone Kenya and they were pushing these TVs knowing the public wont see 4K on it.

Thats my whole point. This 4K marketing push doesnt need a 4K broadcast anywhere to sell TVs EVER. I believe they dont even expect broadcasters to get on board and they dont need them to to sell TVs.

June 28, 2014 at 10:22PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Simon, during the late 1930's and mid-40's, the Germans set the very nascent TV displays in store windows as a propaganda tool for the latest Nazi missives. The Nazis decided not to stick around after 1945 but, as you may have heard, that TV thing took off. And giant and very expensive 4K displays are obviously used as an advertising gimmick rather than an actual item for sale. When I was in the TV biz, we had a 43" CRT Sony model at the store front that cost ~ $30,000. That was in 1990. It was largely a proof of the Improved Definition TV concept. The large 4K TV in Nairobi had the same idea behind it.
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BTW, Red Shark News had an article this week about a 50" TLC 4K TV that the article's author purchased for $750. His main complaint was SD / DVD looked like crap but that upscaled Blu-Ray looked very good and actual 4K footage and direct video feeds (from GH4) were outright fantastic.

June 29, 2014 at 11:52AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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DLD

If Nikon really is coming out with a low priced camera in the fall that has 4K video I won't care anymore about the D810 not having it. This video image is fantastic. And I hope a lower priced camera like the V1 does have it. :-) Of course I'm going to brace for seeing that oh so wonderful 30 minute limit on it.

Is it just me, or is the video world movie much more quickly to 4K than it did to 1080p???

June 28, 2014 at 12:43AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene,,

moving

June 28, 2014 at 7:11AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene,,

Those comments on camera's articles are mostly depressing to say the least with the exception of 2 or 3. I hope the uninformed reader just skip the comments section of these posts.

June 27, 2014 at 2:50PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Marcus

The comments are the best part. Sometimes i just skip the articles and go right to the comments. I like how the most angry commentators usually have no clue what they are talking about yet are so dickishly sure of themselves.

June 28, 2014 at 3:44AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Derek

Most of the negative comments about the D810 are from D800/D800E owners who appear to be justify the increase is not worth while (which maybe do for them ) but not having either of those models I'm delighted to see the "short Cummings" or "bumps ironed out" that's So in reality what we have is a new D810 polished up so that the camera behaved in a more desired way.
IE improved accuracy in auto focus, Better ISO rating , less shutter shake with new Shutter design , a different sensor tweeted up for low light performance and a 30% Faster processor not to mention refinements in Video and other more subtle improvements such as 2 inbuilt mics able to do 9mp video for fast processing and delivery.
None of these on their own are very significant , however when combined they will bring a camera more capable and more of a pleasure to use..,Which will make people like me pleased and owners of the previous model a little "miffed"....so suck on that!

June 28, 2014 at 1:17AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Allan (Doc)

+1

June 28, 2014 at 2:12AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Give me a GH4 anyday.

June 28, 2014 at 3:10PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Rob

The latest Canon news that I heard is that the 5D Mark IV will be out early 2015. Rumored specs: Over 30 megapixels; 4K Resolution; Not Mirrorless; Digic 7; Drastically changed sensor design.

June 29, 2014 at 10:59AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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RidingtheDragon

Will not be mirrorless you say?

June 29, 2014 at 12:59PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Enjoying Some G...

The rumor is that it will have a mirror mechanism. Apparently, they're hard at work on a completely different sensor. How will this all jive together? Who knows? Upon release, it could be dramatically different. I suspect more plausible leaks will happen since Canon are visiting select studios with security.

July 1, 2014 at 3:40AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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RidingtheDragon

Those were the rumoured specs for the 5DMk3....

June 29, 2014 at 9:05PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Speaking of 4K:

Transformers (shot in 4K and 6K) makes $300,000.00 in first weekend. Will pass Godzilla before next weekend ends. Easy to pass a movie when it's lame.

June 29, 2014 at 8:22PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Enjoying Some G...

Was it finished in 4K? At least for IMAX filmout?

July 1, 2014 at 9:40PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Natt

"Nikon is introducing a flat video profile, which should make coloring footage much easier for shooters to do in post"

What a pile of BULL this flat video profile shooting is. I've been grading 5D flat-profile crap for two years now (when our in-house DP thought it would be cool and didn't tell anyone) and it's a great way to triple the workload for your colourist and waste a ton of time.

Do people not realize that highly-compressed video should be nailed in-camera? Why on earth would you *ever* throw away all your saturation??? Crazy. Do people not realize the difference between shooting with LUT or shooting RAW versus cranking down your saturation and boosting your blacks? NOT the same thing.

Mid-tones suffer the most, of course, especially flesh-tones. And I'm delivering to NatGeo and S4C, who are a little picky about such things.

Here's the truth: shooting flat is a crutch. It's a way to avoid capturing well-exposed, well-balanced pictures in camera. Anyone can shoot flat. It's an easy way to avoid the challenges of shooting and then you get to pass it off to someone else to fix for you.

Nikon is obviously as clueless as Joe Hipster when it comes to this stuff, and this is coming from a longtime Nikon shooter.

July 3, 2014 at 6:17PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Ron I

lol what a pile a garbage how can you compare that to canon 5d and what to say about the directing and the overall look of the film slow motion and high lights look like a bad video from the 80's i am embarassed for nikon keep trying boys and dry your eyes at list the photo part of that camera is fantastic

July 3, 2014 at 6:21PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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teka

this is good news. Now maybe Canon will reply with a similar model?
As far as 1080p being old hat. I disagree. It is still a viable, watchable format. 4k is great and has a lot of potential in the right hands. But it also requires much more storage, much more bandwidth, and huge amounts of processing power to grade, effect and edit.
I'd rather spend the money on lenses than on higher resolution I won't necessarily exploit.
TBH we DO shoot on 4k for certain projects, but then we crop that down to 1080 in post. We are merely using it as a way to give us more latitude in framing. This works great for greenscreeny stuff.

July 7, 2014 at 3:50PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Calaverasgrande