» Posts Tagged ‘peterjackson’

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Video thumbnail for vimeo video Sound of The Hobbit - No Film SchoolMichael Coleman is back with another terrific SoundWorks Collection video. This time we’ve got the sound team from Peter Jackson’s second film in the Hobbit trilogy, The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug. With such a large and expensive project, there is a lot that has to go into making the movie feel as large as it should, and the sound designers, mixers, and composer play a huge part in that. Check out that video below, as well as some more involving the sound from both films. More »

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BTS recording SmaugThough Peter Jackson’s prequel series, The Hobbit, hasn’t quite reached the level of acclaim as that of the Lord of the Rings trilogy, there are some aspects, including the score, that harken back to the tale of Frodo and the Shire. In yet another installment of Jackson’s production diary, The Hobbit Blog, we’re taken behind the scenes during the recording of the original score, which was composed by Academy Award winner Howard Shore, who worked on both series. Continue on to see just how these filmmakers captured the tone and themes for The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug. More »

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Peter JacksonThere are so many films out there that filmmakers with all types of budgets, tastes, and sensibilities try to learn from and emulate. Screenwriters may look to Chinatown to learn its structure while cinematographers may look to Soy Cuba for its one-of-a-kind tracking shot. And then there’s Peter Jackson’s first feature film Bad Taste (1987). Before he was working with top dollar visual effects, Jackson was a DIY filmmaker making films on a small budget, and in the 1988 documentary, Good Taste Made Bad Taste, he shares how he shot the movie using stabilizers, dollies, and cranes that he made himself — an unintentional DIY tutorial for all low-budget filmmakers. More »

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So The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey has officially opened, and we’ve already got some reactions from around the globe. If you’ve been waiting for the last video blog that was promised at the end of the one we shared here, it has finally appeared today. The video shows the chaos that went into the New Zealand premiere and the finishing of the film up until the last possible moments. Since the film was shot in 3D at 48fps on the RED EPIC, that’s the way the movie was intended to be seen, so if you’re wondering where you can see it that way, a frequently updated list has been put together to let you know where the film is playing in all its high frame rate glory. More »

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While there has been a tremendous amount of talk about the way the trilogy of Hobbit films are being shot in 3D on RED at 48fps, the behind the scenes production videos have done an excellent job showing the tremendous work that goes into a production of this scale. The current production video, the ninth in the series, takes a fascinating look at the post-production process. From visual effects, to sound design, to color grading, each specific department has a particular focus and they all work within their roles to complement the entire production. Click through to check out Production Video #9 with Peter Jackson: More »

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Some of you might know a new up-and-coming director by the name of Peter Jackson. He’s a guy with a lot of potential, and he’s directing this new independent film called The Hobbit (I know, not very funny, I tried). Kidding aside, if you’ve been following our site for awhile, you may have already seen the other production diary videos that Jackson and Co. have been making for the new Hobbit two-parter. The crew for these videos is probably as big as some low-budget films — which just makes the entire process even more impressive. More »

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While there has been some interesting debate about the future of filmmaking (higher frame rates vs. 3D), Peter Jackson has been busy shooting The Hobbit in 3D on RED Epics at 48fps. They’ve had some wonderful behind-the-scenes production videos that are not only fascinating for their in-depth look at the continuation of The Lord of the Rings series, but also give some insight into the way in which real sets function. It’s not always clear exactly what certain positions actually do when you’re watching the credits of a film, but in this seventh production video, we’re taken on the lot for The Hobbit, and get to see many of these important positions performing their duties. More »

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Ten minutes of glorious 48fps footage from The Hobbit was recently shown at CinemaCon in Las Vegas. It’s unfortunate that RED couldn’t show any footage at their NAB booth, but I’m sure fans of the series were delighted to get a glimpse of Peter Jackson’s new epic film (pun intended) shot on RED Epic in 3D at 48fps. We’ve talked a little bit about frame rates before, and what they mean for our industry, but this is the first time a film of this scale is going to be filmed and exhibited at 48fps in 3D. Unfortunately, it doesn’t seem like the 270 degree shutter is helping things, as the results aren’t impressing many of those who watched it. More »

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Peter Jackson and the crew on the The Hobbit have been sharing periodic video blog updates on the film’s production via their Facebook page, and they recently released the fifth episode. It’s easy to assume with the advent of CGI that anything in the background of a fantasy blockbuster is added in post, but that’s often not the case, as evidenced by the construction of a real “Hobbiton” this time around. This latest episode covers the logistics and physical scope of a 250-day, $500 million movie production (well, two movies really):

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Cinematographer/director/effects guru Douglas Trumball made an eye-opening presentation at NAB as part of the Digital Cinema Society conference this past week. Trumball, who was instrumental in the effects of 2001: A Space Odyssey, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, and Blade Runner, tried to get a 60 frames-per-second format known as Showscan off the ground in the late 70s (it never took). Was Trumball just ahead of his time? At the same time Trumball was presenting, Peter Jackson had begun shooting The Hobbit at 48 frames per second. Jackson expects there to be 10,000 theaters ready to exhibit the film at 48 FPS by the time of its release. He’s not the only one clamoring for a new cinema standard, however: More »