» Posts Tagged ‘shortfilm’

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CropperCapture[92]Over the years, we’ve covered a wide range of methods and tools for lighting a film, everything from hardware store clip lights to high-end cinema lighting tools. As fantastic and practical as some of the higher-end tools can be, most of us just don’t have the budget to rent (let alone own) those tools, so we end up resorting to cheap fixtures and DIY light-sculpting methods in order to illuminate our films. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, however, considering that having a DIY mindset when lighting can produce some truly ingenious and cost-effective techniques. Not So Fast, a short film from David F. Sandberg, is one such example of DIY lighting ingenuity. In a short BTS video about the making of the film, David reveals how he used a plastic IKEA trashcan in order to create a portably-powered DIY beauty dish that provides fantastic results. More »

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Random Stop Still Image

Shooting something entirely from a first person POV may not be new, but every once in a while an exceptionally well-done shot or scene (or even an entire short) makes you step back and appreciate what can be done with the technique and how difficult it is to pull off, especially when you need to cleverly hide cuts. That’s the case with Random Stop, a short film based on the tragic real-life shooting of Sheriff’s Deputy Kyle Dinkheller after a routine traffic stop. We’ve also got a behind the scenes video that is launching first on No Film School, so be sure to check that out after watching the short. More »

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Tatia Pilieva Undress MeBack in March, filmmaker Tatia Pilieva took the internet by storm with her video First Kiss, which paired complete strangers together, and as the title suggests, had them kiss on camera for the first time. The viral hit, which was used as a promo for women’s clothing company WREN, had a bit of backlash from those who considered the video a hoax because there were actors and models used, but Pilieva’s goal was not about using anyone off the street, but about the interactions between strangers doing something intimate. Now she’s back again with another “stranger” video, this time it’s a more diverse group of people who’ve never met taking each other’s clothes off. More »

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Michael ShannonJames Franco is everywhere these days. Between acting in just about everything and directing feature after feature, it seems safe to say that he’s in the prime of his creative output. In terms of his directorial efforts, Franco definitely has an affinity for adapting tough pieces of literature, like his upcoming feature Child of God, which is based on a novel by Cormac McCarthy, plus As I Lay Dying and The Sound and the Fury, both of which are based upon William Faulkner novels previously thought to be unadaptable. The adaptations didn’t start with that recent trio of films, however, but in the late 2000′s with several short films based on poems. One of these short film adaptations comes from a Frank Bidart poem called Herbert White, and, as luck would have it, it’s is probably one of the most disturbing films that you will ever see. Oh, and it stars Michael Shannon. More »

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A short film can be just that: a short glimpse into a world of the filmmaker’s creation. But then there are those short films that come with a medium-spanning world for audiences to explore far longer than the last frame of the film. One such successful transmedia project is Nathan Punwar’s Loves of a Cyclops, where the viewer can enter a nonsensical world with enough supporting material (film strips, recordings, and photographs) to make you wonder if Cycloptics might just be possible. No Film School sat down with Punwar to talk about anything from the rewards of transmedia to how Pixar just might look into multidimensional cycloptic viewing. More »

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David Cronenberg Short Film - The NestDavid Cronenberg’s new short film, shot on a GoPro in one continuous take, is certainly NSFW, but depending on your distaste for insects, may also be NSFL. The film is pure Cronenberg, and it’s clear that things are a little off right from the get-go as a shirtless woman is being examined by a less-than-trustworthy surgeon who is recording the entire consultation with a camera strapped to his head. (Just as a warning, the thumbnail of the video itself is also NSFW). More »

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Ryan Connolly and Olivia Speranza talk to No Film School about the My Rode Reel ContestRøde’s latest promotional effort brings together top companies from every corner of the film industry to offer $70,000 in prizes to encourage filmmakers to get creative. By submitting a short film of up to 5 minutes in length with a supplemental behind-the-scenes video showing the use of a Røde microphone you can win cameras, gear and software from Adobe, Blackmagic, Miller, Kessler, and many others. No Film School’s Joe Marine caught up with Ryan Connolly and Olivia Speranza at NAB to talk about how it works, why they are excited to be involved and important deadlines for the contest. Watch the video after the jump and learn everything you need to know. More »

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Preparing yourself for any film festival can be a stressful situation, and for those of you getting ready to go to the Cannes Short Film Corner, the clock is ticking! If you’re finding yourself lost trying to figure out how to start preparing for your stay, filmmaker Lit Kilpatrick is here to share a few lessons he learned from his trip last year. This is Part 2 of his 3-part series on how to survive the Cannes Short Film Corner.

This is a guest post by Lit Kilpatrick. More »

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First Kiss Viral Short FilmGaining 30 million views in just a couple days, this record-breaking filmvertisement directed by Tatia Pilieva features 20 seemingly random couples engaging in a first kiss on camera. Is this heartwarming display of love and innocence an authentic one, or just another example of well executed viral marketing? Read on to watch the film and get all the details: More »

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Cannes Palais
The Cannes International Film Festival is one of the most prestigious film festivals in the world, but premiering, screening, and awarding the best feature films isn’t all that Cannes has to offer. Cannes Short Film Corner is an event that allows the creators of short films an opportunity to show their projects to a massive audience, pitch future projects, and hopefully make many important connections as well. However, the festivities can seem quite overwhelming, but Brooklyn-based filmmaker Lit Kilpatrick is here to walk you through Cannes and fill you in on how to make the most out of your visit. Lit describes all of the basics for those who aren’t familiar with the short film corner in part 1 of our 3-part series.

This is a guest post by Lit Kilpatrick. More »

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Shooting with Alexa

Despite the name of our website, there are many things to be learned in film school, and director Addison Mehr chose an especially interesting project for his NYU thesis film. Fort Apache is the story of small town escape, adapted from a popular short story by Alan Heathcock. Click through to watch the film and get Addison’s perspective on film school, reaching out to an established author, casting and finding stories that resonate. More »

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New Music Cities - Tokyo

What is a city without its own music scene? Well personally speaking, it’s a place I want to escape from in favour of somewhere less lacking in the essential pulse that provides a locale with its underlying vibrancy. In his ongoing documentary series New Music Cities, created in collaboration with Dazed and AllSaints, director Jamie Jessett takes a counter-cultural look at some of the world’s global music centres. No Film School caught up with Jamie to find out how he’s been tapping into and capturing the diverse musical underground and how he managed to create an engaging documentary about an anonymous drug dealer for UK TV screens. More »

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Zeiss OtusIn 2012, Zeiss announced that a brand new stills lens was in the works, one that would achieve perfection in optical performance through a no-compromise approach. Fast forward to November of 2013, and the company released the Otus 1.4/55, a prime lens that truly is uncompromising in all aspects of its design. While many of us are familiar with the Zeiss ZE glass for video work (great lenses), we have yet to see how the Otus would fare in a video setting. Luckily, filmmaker August Bradley managed to get his hands on an early pre-release version of the Otus, and he shot a delightful little concept piece called Zoetrope Optika that truly showcases the flawless performance of this marvelous lens. More »

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Writer's Block Cast & Crew

While on the set of the Tze Chun/Bryan Cranston thriller Cold Comes the Night in 2012, Hurricane Sandy rolled into New York. This led to some downtime on set, and that’s when Cranston — sport that he is — came up with a short film contest: the best script submitted by a production assistant gets to produce it with Cranston in the lead role. Click through to watch the film that was born from the contest and read our interview with director Brandon Polanco. More »

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Prieto C500 WideThe Canon C500 is one of those cameras that hasn’t been readily adopted by the film industry, at least not to the extent of ARRI and RED products. Sure, it played a very small role in the production of Scorsese’s The Wolf of Wall Street, and Shane Hurlbut chose it as his A-Cam on Need For Speed, but for the most part, it doesn’t get much love in the narrative filmmaking world. However, world-class cinematographer Rodrigo Prieto ASC, AMC, (The Wolf of Wall Street, Argo) recently lensed a short film called Human Voice on the high-end Canon camera, and offered his take on why it was the right choice for this project, and how specifically it was set up for this film. More »

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I'm HereSpike Jonze is one of those unique filmmakers that both takes huge narrative and visual risks in his films while still making them relatable and marketable. His latest project Her does just the same — a story about a man who develops a relationship with his operation system “Samantha”. However, Jonze’s entire body of work makes use of his strange, off-beat sensibility, and in this video by The Creators Project, we take a look behind the scenes of his 2010 I’m Here, and learn how Jonze and his team developed the emotion in a short film about two robots who fall in love. More »

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Making a SceneJanusz Kaminski is an industry legend. Since 1990, he has DP’d over 30 feature films, and been nominated for 6 cinematography Oscars (two of which he’s won). His most notable work has been with Steven Spielberg, for whom he’s shot just about every film in recent memory. This past month, Kaminski partnered up with The New York Times to direct 11 original short films for the NYT Magazine’s “Movies Issue.” Each film was shot on the RED EPIC MX (which is unusual for Kaminski since he normally shoots film) and features one of Hollywood’s most prominent actors, ranging from Bradley Cooper to Robert Redford, and a single line of dialogue written by one of today’s top screenwriters. Check out a few of the films below, as well as an excellent behind the scenes video showing Kaminski’s filmmaking process: More »

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AningaaqFor a film to be at its best, right from the earliest stages of script development you have to be willing to cull those ideas which either don’t advance the narrative or break the dramatic tension you’ve worked so hard to build over the proceeding pages. Sometimes this can mean jettisoning a scene which perfectly encompasses the themes of your larger narrative as was the case in the early stages of Alfonso & Jonás Cuarón’s work on the epic space survival feature Gravity. Fortunately for us, Jonás Cuarón was able to convince Warner Home Video to fund a short called Aningaaq which gave life to the Earth side of Sandra Bullock’s desperate, lost in translation SOS radio contact and has now made its way online. More »

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Castello CavalcantiWes Anderson is at it again with his second branded film, Castello Cavalcanti, marketing the “Candy L’Eau” fragrance from Italian luxury fashion house Prada. Castello, like his and Roman Coppola’s first installment for Prada, is set in Europe, only instead of France, takes place in a small Italian town circa 1955. The director’s signature style is seen throughout the 8-minute short, however his specific nods to historical Italian cinema, namely the work of Fellini, offer an added bonus to Anderson’s fans. Continue on to check out the short. More »

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Jane CampionSo many great filmmakers got their start directing short films: Martin Scorsese made several well-received shorts while at NYU, David Lynch’s shorts contain the same unsettling DNA as his features, and Paul Thomas Anderson’s pre-Boogie Nights Dirk Diggler first existed in short film form. Jane Campion is no different. Her shorts demonstrate the dark humor and visual style, especially the ones she made while studying at the Australian Film and Television School in the 1980s — 3 of which Cinephilia and Beyond has compiled and shared. Continue on to check out these noteworthy shorts. More »