March 9, 2015

Shooting on the 4K Samsung NX1 & Creating An Aesthetic in the Color Grade

Ed David Samsung NX1 Short Film
The Samsung NX1 is an odd, powerful little camera. In the hands of an artist, however, it becomes something much, much more.

Our good friend Ed David, a working DP based out of NYC who was one of the first to share thoughts and footage from the Sony FS7, has been playing with another camera as of late. This time it's the Samsung NX1, a mirrorless camera that shoots 4K internally, encodes to h.265, and has an APS-C sensor to boot. Ed recently put together an introspective, insightful short film about his love/hate relationship with New York City, and he shared his entire process with us.

We often make a whole lot of fuss about the cameras that we choose because of a fairly widespread belief that the camera and its specific sensor are largely responsible for the final aesthetic of an image. For The Quiet Escape, however, Ed chose to focus his energy more on his post production and grading processes in order to achieve an aesthetic inspired by a combination of French New Wave directors and the master himself, Gordon Willis.

The inspiration came from the films of Chris Marker and Godard and Agnes Varda of Paris back in the 60's and 70's - the way they shot film stock back then, the 16mm stuff had deeper blacks and lots of grain. Even though I love that look, I wanted the film to feel like it was shot in any era because it's a timeless American issue - loving/hating New York. And of course, I tried to pay tribute to Woody Allen's "Manhattan," shot by Gordon Willis, which is perhaps the most beautiful look at New York City ever committed to film. I just love that film and everything Gordon has ever shot. He was a tried and true New Yorker and he inspired me so much with everything he does.

Manhattan Still Frame Woody Allen Gordon Willis
Still frame from Woody Allen's 'Manhattan': One of the major inspirations for the aesthetic of Ed David's short film

In order to create an aesthetic akin to the grainy, kinetic new wave films of the 60's, Ed chose to shape it in the grade instead of pursuing a look that might not have been possible in-camera. Of course, it's relatively easy to shoot noisy, high-contrast images with most of today's digital cameras, but to say that those images aren't particularly pleasing might be the understatement of the year. Ed's process for shooting and grading this piece is as follows:

1. I shot as flat as I could on the NX1 - this was before Gamma DR [introduced in a recent firmware update] - so I made a profile like the Prolost profile that exists on the Canon 5D Mark II and III (contrast all the way down and saturation minus two).

2. I converted with Wondershare to ProRes HQ. Brought it into DaVinci resolve and applied a FilmConvert grade over it - Fuji Neo for the black and white sections and Fuji Eterna for the color.

3. I went in and modified the FilmConvert settings - gave it a more aggressive curve - raised the mids, and in the black and white footage lowered the shadows. In the color stuff, I kept it flatter, less deep (inky) blacks and softer. So the color footage feels more peaceful. 

4. I put an overlay of Gorilla Grain over the footage - using dissolve and kept standard contrast.

Here are a few examples of what the raw footage looked like out of the camera compared to the final graded images:

Color Correction Film Convert Samsung NX1
Raw footage from the Samsung NX1
Ed David Samsung NX1 Short Film
Graded version, made to resemble 16mm film and Gordon Willis's work in Manhattan
Ed David Samsung NX1 Short Film
Raw footage from the Samsung NX1
Ed David Samsung NX1 Short Film
Graded version.
Ed David Samsung NX1 Short Film
Raw footage from the Samsung NX1
Ed David Samsung NX1 Short Film
Graded version.

Ultimately, I think the visual tone in this short works miraculously for its subject matter. By combining the angsty, energetic camera work of many new wave directors with the focused, romantic aesthetic that Gordon Willis captured for Manhattan, and by using color to differentiate the two vastly different worlds in the film, Ed was able visually convey the dissonance that he feels about the city of New York, while also paying homage to some of his favorite filmmakers.

If you have any questions for Ed about how he shot and graded the film, leave them down in the comments!     

Your Comment

38 Comments

seems more like an ad than an article tbh

March 9, 2015 at 6:35AM

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Filmdudezero
Director
265

dito.

March 9, 2015 at 7:04AM

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Simon Reichel
Director & Editor
132

this isn't intended as an ad, though I can see how it can be construed as such. What I'm trying to say is that any camera, as long as you flatten out the contrast on it - is able to be graded and taken to a specific style by grading and post production and lighting and composition and movement. The camera at this point is irrelevant, just as in basketball - it doesn't matter what shoes you were - it matters how much you practice for.

But yes I can see it looking like it's a commercial for the NX1 - but really - I believe in camera agnosticism - to me yes cameras can give you certain advantages and disadvantages, but just as important is every other aspect like the lenses, the lighting, the movement.

I'm sorry you guys saw the article as this way - I really am.

March 9, 2015 at 7:22AM

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Ed David
Director of Photography
1426

To me it's mostly the fact that you basically used filmconvert and made it black and white. As far as grading goes, you didn't really do much.

Not that it doesn't work for your film, it's just hardly anything worth reading about, no offence. But that's why it seems like an ad for your film.

March 10, 2015 at 4:44AM

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Filmdudezero
Director
265

Ed, I love the look and I assume you did further grading after you applied the looks so I never felt it was a simple case of applying a look. Having grown up in Montana and moved to LA I perfect identify with your feelings behind this short film. Great work!

March 10, 2015 at 12:05PM

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Jonathan Payne
Post Production
119

Not sure I agree, Ed. For your particular film, may be any camera would have sufficed. But then I'm not sure you really tested the strengths of NX1 relating to resolution, skin tones, DR, low light, and the like, so it doesn't really mean much. Kind of like concluding looks aren't important after seeing Charlize Theron in Monster. If you shoot a film that does test the NX1 strengths, I'd love to see it (not too many NX1 films out there that do that).

March 11, 2015 at 12:17PM

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After a week I finally got the response I really wanted for my short film, "the Quiet Escape" that you can only get from posting something online and having the anonymous bathroom wall writing comment on it:

"I don't mean to be rude because a lot of the shots were decent but hearing you call NYC a shithole made me disinterested .... just felt like a lot of whining. And its not magic most 20 something living in Williamsburg can afford rent they have there parents paying the bills so don't cry for them to hard. I mean why is this even a on here? What did we learn? sorry but Phillip Bloom teaches more in a simple instagram post. We can do better..... Good luck in the country buddy I was born and raised in Manhattan and it usually spits out most transplants eventually so don't feel bad"

First off, I'm not a transplant. I was born and raised in Fairfield, CT - this is 52 miles from the Bronx - and transplants are from a distance greater to or equal to 78 miles from a borough of New York City according to urbantransplantrules.org. But anyway.

This comment is the underlying air that exists in New York City that you have confront after living in NYC for a certain period of time. This feeling that you are never legit, you are never part of it, that you are always an outsider and that people want you to leave. That you never really fit in, that you're not a true New Yorker and you'll never be one because person X has lived there longer than you. Especially if you come from the Midwest.

I dealt with this a lot on a website called Diehipster.com - it was a anti-gentrification website that featured fantasy scenarios where the blogger, Diehipster, would post videos of people who looked like hipsters getting beaten and stomped on, and also a section where he would write a fantasy story of beating or maiming a hipster in a variety of cartoony ways. He was big when the hipster thing started becoming a thing around 2003-2005, or at least his hit counter clocked in at a million views. He kept the blog going for years, but I think now it's over - maybe he moved on.

The undercurrent in NYC is grumpy and negative, like your grandpa when he's off his meds. Maybe it comes from the rents raising and the food prices raising and the amount of people living there increasing - a feeling of loss, of being hurt by forces around you. It makes people grumpy and have that "New York TUDE" that is celebrated in many of films about NYC. Similar to the grumpiness of people who live in Russia - it's fun - it's okay - once you get it, you can smile about it and see it's just kind of funny.

But why is NYC grumpy, and the South and the Midwest polite? In New York, the 1970s-90s had outward migration from upper middle class to the suburbs of Connecticut and New York and New Jersey - White Flight. My mother grew up in Manhattan and she had me in Connecticut in the 80s - so maybe I was in some ways part of this trend.

Then I moved in 2003 after college into Brooklyn - so I did a reverse migration back into the city, part of a huge trend of young people who moved to Brooklyn - I was one of many. I moved there for work. Unlike a friend of mine, I didn't move there because I was in love with the place - I'm more a guy who enjoys the view of the ocean than a view of a skyscraper. But I do love people. So it was a good place to study people and talk with so many diverse people. You can't get that diversity in that many cities - it's pretty unique not just for the US but for the world.

Now young people and specifically upper middle class people and higher are leaving NYC in mass exodus - this time it's not for reasons of crime but of cost of rent and food.

And it's interesting how this endless drama plays out - cycle after cycle. You see it in all neighborhoods - like in South Williamsburg how the neighborhood went from Italian to Puerto Rican to White Artists to Hipsters and Fauxists and now bankers and Google employees.

This time crime is way down. The cops take the credit for "Stop and Frisk" but the truth is that crime went down so greatly 2 weeks after the cops went on strike over De Blasio's comments that I think crime really is actually down because drug use is down and young people are able to find more opportunities and express themselves better without drugs or violence. They can now instead of punching someone, anonymously comment and express their frustration on a video made by some guy about leaving New York, and also can quickly go on YouPorn and take out their "built-up frustration." So the internet also has changed the city and the world, made it easier for people to see "hey is living in New York worth the $4000 a month that rent, food, and utilities and metro card costs" to work as an artist or as anything starting out as a young person?

Is the "Quiet Escape" really taking a "dump" on NYC? No it's not, well yes kind of - it's not that simple. It's a study of the city - yes - and it's showing the flaws of the city - but that doesn't mean I don't still love it. You can find flaws in anyone or anything and still appreciate it - love/hate it. I'll always love NYC and I still rent a place in Brooklyn - it's just better for me at this point in my life to gain some distance from it, just like you do want to eventually leave pretending to enjoy the show "Girls" because you can't stand Lena Dunham's voice or everything about it even though you only watched 2 episodes and you love Broad City so much more - god I love Broad City - I want to hug everyone on that show.

It's like that girlfriend or boyfriend or friend that you love, but you know that if you spend too much time with that person you'll start to not become who you really want to be. And I was quickly turning into that bitter, angry person. And that's not who I really am. Well kind of it is - that negativity is part of my creativity and I've always been really happy and sad and bitter, all at the same time! I think everyone is. That's the truth. And certain things bring out the good, and certain things bring out the bad. I just need to take it and make it positive and come to a new realization about my place in this great cosmic universe before it all goes to environmental hell, and the rich take their one-way $300 million ticket to Mars.

March 11, 2015 at 8:02AM

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Ed David
Director of Photography
1426

Ed, Nice flick..........I'm going to be 70 in July......I grew up directly across the river from NYC and lived most of my working life within 30 miles of THE city. I retired and moved to the Poconos PA having the same sentiments that you expressed in your story. My advice, for what it's worth......stay close to the city. The grass is always greener somewhere else............until you get there.

March 9, 2015 at 7:09AM

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Jerry Roe
Indie filmmaker
970

thanks Jerry - I think that though if one is having difficulty creating art because of some much stimulation then it is time to move. Or at least maybe move every seven years (the Seven year itch?) - and also you are right, what is the external vs internal stress - is it NYC or is it just me growing older?
But the fact is, NYC is getting unbelievably expensive. Brooklyn and Queens now are as expensive, just about, as Manhattan. So there is less and less chance to not work constantly through one's twenties, those important years where we start to find out who we are, and also where we usually find a loved one.

And I was lucky, I grew up in my twenties there from 2003 till 2013 - but now, jeeze I don't know how the younger ones do it - and I think unemployment for young people 20-25 is hovering around 30 percent in the US.

So how do they possibly afford it in this city? I hope that most of them don't come here and build their lives in other cities, which I see more and more because I'm on the road a lot for work. Los Angeles and Austin, TX are thriving for young filmmakers.

In essence, I think as all us artists know, "live where it's cheap" - that's the only thing we need to follow. Beyond that, it's making sure you have enough friends and loved ones to keep you interested. And culture is important.

I don't know personally about the Poconos and living more quiantly - but now with the internet, we all do have a lot more modes of communication from wherever we are - it's not as isolating.

But even with that, I don't think the level of stimulation I go thru each day here in Brooklyn is worth it. My dog taught me that quickly. He kind of woke me up to the insanity of living in Brooklyn. All those weird noises . And he would go up to strangers expecting a pat on the head but he got nothing and thought that was weird. Every person (and squirrel) to him is special - without acknowledgment, to him it just felt cold.

March 9, 2015 at 7:29AM

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Ed David
Director of Photography
1426

Hi Ed,

First, thank you for the article and the film. I enjoyed it. It wasn't an ad, it was more a glimpse into a colleague's mind, on a subject that's relevant to me (being a mostly-NYC-based filmmaker).

I'm going to say something you may disagree with. That's OK. My experience in Austin sucked donkey balls. Yours might not, everyone's different. If you're looking to make your own films, and work a day job, you'll be fine there. And there's lots of opportunity as full-timer, if you like working for really bad rates, and working on sub-par projects. It's a great place to sit around and smoke weed and talk about the films you're gonna make, or to work for free on films with your buddies, but it's a crap place for making a living as a filmmaker, unless you're on the big out-of-town crews. For me, as a director/DP (versus a PA or whatever), it was truly a hellish (but beautiful) place, and I'm grateful to be gone. I was seduced by the "Austin's a top filmmaking community" lovefest stuff plastered all over the news, but if you rely on commercial or corporate work, as I do, it's not nearly as bright a place.

As you say in your film, NYC can be like that, too. So, your mileage may vary. But for me, for well-paid projects that allow me to have a good lifestyle, I have found that almost all my work comes out of NYC and LA (even when the ultimate shoot happens elsewhere). So, I hope you keep a presence in NY, or as Jerry suggests, you don't go TOO far.

And I completely understand how NY really can get you down. Especially this winter. Yuck. And the prices are insane. But if you chose Austin... eyes wide open, man. I am lucky to have escaped that town.

March 9, 2015 at 11:26AM

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Patrick Ortman
I tell stories. Sometimes for money. Sometimes, not.

I hear you on that P Dawg - LA and NYC and Toronto and Vancover seem like the North American hub for filmmaking - but smaller markets like Atlanta and New Orleans seem to be thriving but at a cheaper cost of living. Maybe Austin is not the best, but finding ones niche is a good way. Being a little fish in a big pond can be really hard too.

March 9, 2015 at 4:54PM

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Ed David
Director of Photography
1426

He Ed,
I really loved your little film. You shared us your thoughts in a wonderful aesthetic way. The black and white is a tasteful reconstruction of the past, in combination with the score a man could forget the year we live in at the moment.
Thanks!

March 9, 2015 at 12:21PM

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Hey, I love the look of this.

What glass did you shoot on? Was it just the kit lens?

Do you feel like this would have been easier with Gamma DR than with your settings? Have you shot anything to compare your settings to GDR?

March 9, 2015 at 2:54PM

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Hi Wes - just a 35mm nikon ais lens f/2.0 - old ! And one shot was the Leica 100mm macro lens.

I did start testing Gamma DR which is more like log - it came out during my shooting and I already shot in my flat setting so I didn't switch over - but I've not found too much of difference between Gamma DR and just turning contrast all the way down. I told the Samsung PR person that, Jay, and he says he's looking into it. But still - I find that grading the image is quite nice even in the 4:2:0 world. It nails the skintones really nicely out of the gate - so that's always a good place to start.

March 9, 2015 at 4:52PM

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Ed David
Director of Photography
1426

I really dug it. Great insight. I really don't see where it seemed like an ad. It was just a really cool statement about the place where you live, and your feelings towards it. Very creative.

March 9, 2015 at 3:55PM, Edited March 9, 3:55PM

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where is the score that is playing?

The music goes so beautifully with your vintage feeling images.

March 9, 2015 at 5:09PM, Edited March 9, 5:09PM

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thanks it's Stravinsky - I forget the concerto or whatever it is called :)

March 9, 2015 at 7:30PM

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Ed David
Director of Photography
1426

*what is the score?

March 9, 2015 at 5:10PM, Edited March 9, 5:10PM

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beautiful work. that grade is magical, feels like a legit old black and white film - love it. nice job!

March 9, 2015 at 8:54PM

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Ben Howling
Writer / Director
596

That's a filter not a grade. Instagram generation are so easy to please.

March 10, 2015 at 6:27AM

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keith
277

Only thing Instagram-generation about this page is cynical comments like this one.

March 10, 2015 at 9:44AM

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Greg Latham
One Man Band
173

My intention of watching the video was like always to see the quality of the video but I really enjoy this short story. AWESOME!

March 9, 2015 at 10:45PM

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Keith Kim
Photographer
1628

This is a nice piece, but I think it's time for movie makers to stop thinking about emulating film. We have a fairly evolved digital medium capable of giving us visual options we've never had before, and yet we cling on to the religion of "the film look".

In all honesty I found the grading annoying, because it's completely clichéd. It was actually distracting to me. Had I not read the article and had the background on why it was done this way, I probably would have found it even more distracting.

People really just have to get over "the film look" and embrace what these refined digital mediums have to offer that haven't come before. That will really open up new ways of creating movies. I see a similar mentality in audio, where everyone tries to emulate the so-called "warm analog" sound, by using either various digital processes, or analog ones like using tube circuits, because of course they'll "warm up" the sound.

It really is time to move on. Film is dead, long live film...

March 9, 2015 at 11:27PM

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Vidrazor
554

Film isn't dead at all. Digital is still not there. At least for me. 35mm film still has perfect motion to me - it's how my eyes see the world. Digital doesn't have this. Also texture is quite useful - the imperfections - how each frame dances slightly.
Maybe I'm old school - I grew up watching film.
It's possible the next generation won't care for it at all.
But for me, I pay my respects to hundreds of years of film history, just as writers will read everything that came before them before they start publishing their work, or musicians will study all the music that came before them. But I appreciate your opinion.

And for me, the best looking digital film I've seen in modern times was Ida, which was shot on the Arri Alexa with Ultra Prime lenses in a 1.66 aspect ratio in black and white with film grain added. That film too was paying respect to our collective visual history.

But hey, my opinion just like yours is just an opinion. So we are both right.

March 10, 2015 at 12:09AM

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Ed David
Director of Photography
1426

>Digital is still not there?

The Academy disagrees. This year's Cinematography Oscar noms - All Alexa.

March 10, 2015 at 12:24PM

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Terma Louis
Photographer / Cinematographer / Editor
1582

The Academy also allowed Crash to win best picture. The academy is only human - the Academy Awards are not the end all, be all of art. The only one that should judge whether something is good or not is the person who makes the film, and the person who watches it. Also, Grand Budapest, Foxcatcher, and a bunch of other films at this year's Academy Awards were shot on film.

March 10, 2015 at 7:15PM

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Ed David
Director of Photography
1426

"Maybe I'm old school - I grew up watching film."
Well, that's exactly my point. It's a neural imprint movie makers can't seem to shake. I'm not trying to single you out here either. But there's this "that's the way my papy did it, and if it was good enough for my Papy, it's good enough for me" mentality that is crippling people from thinking outside of the box.

I grew up on film too, and while I hope film survives at least as a fine art medium, I think it's high time people start trekking off the beaten path. It's like Linus' blanket. It's, to quote the title of an old rock album I listened to as a kid, "as safe as yesterday is"...

March 10, 2015 at 8:27PM

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Vidrazor
554

There are many of us that feel that Digital needs to be able to perfectly emulate film as a baseline and then change from there. Right now it's inability to do that as a basic function is the reason why digital feels like it falls short. If you are replacing something you should be able to perfectly replace it. I couldn't personally disagree more with your above statement.

March 10, 2015 at 12:02PM

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Jonathan Payne
Post Production
119

I think paying homage is important in a visual world - and I will forever pay homage to the great DPs that came before me, and will come after me. We all breathe the same air. And I personally, just as you personally have a dislike for digital trying to look like film - I have a dislike for digital trying to look like digital. I loved Ida - shot on the Arri Alexa - that got as close to the look of Knife in the Water that I ever saw recently. On the other hand, a film that embraces "digital" like Avengers - I'm not as into. Both our opinions are right. That's the whole point of it, right? That there is no objective truth.

March 10, 2015 at 7:13PM

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Ed David
Director of Photography
1426

Gordon Willis understood how to use filters on cameras to create stunning black and white imagery. This uses am Instagram like filter. Embarrassing hyperbole is becoming a hallmark of this site.

March 10, 2015 at 6:43AM

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keith
277

Gordon shot Manhattan on 35mm film with a crew of around 10-20 people. I shot my film with a crew of zero - myself - on an old 35mm Nikon AIS lens with a $1500 camera. It maybe kind of "instagramy" - the color - and that's okay to feel that way - but still you can feel this way, Keith, that is your opinion. In the meantime, I will continue to explore other psychological issues with my environments and the people around me and you can shoot with specific lenses and filtration and cameras and crews to arrive at your greater truths.

March 10, 2015 at 9:02AM

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Ed David
Director of Photography
1426

This doesn't feel like an ad to me because I learned nothing about the actual camera.... and to be honest its a joke we got a walk through on 'grading' when it was simply filmconvert. I don't mean to be rude because a lot of the shots were decent but hearing you call NYC a shithole made me disinterested .... just felt like a lot of whining. And its not magic most 20 something living in Williamsburg can afford rent they have there parents paying the bills so don't cry for them to hard. I mean why is this even a on here? What did we learn? sorry but Phillip Bloom teaches more in a simple instagram post. We can do better..... Good luck in the country buddy I was born and raised in Manhattan and it usually spits out most transplants eventually so don't feel bad .....

March 10, 2015 at 9:56AM

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Hey, Francisco.............you need to grow up and show some intelligence and respect when addressing your superiors. Take a look at Ed's website, http://www.kittyguerrilla.com and then tell him how great you are.
Or maybe you can tell us all about the last multi-million feature you directed.
Or maybe you should look in a mirror.

March 10, 2015 at 1:47PM

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Jerry Roe
Indie filmmaker
970

Superiors!? your cute Jerry. The link did very little for me and the ego pissing match is typical and so predictable. Good luck with that.

March 11, 2015 at 12:16PM

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Actually Francesco I'm not a transplant - I was born and raised in Fairfield, CT - a suburb of New York City. A transplant is someone who moves to NYC from a distance greater than 50 miles. But anyway, yes it's sad isn't it to have someone who lived in Brooklyn and Manhattan for 10 years total come in and show from his experience what he thinks is wrong with it - that it's too expensive and loud and cold and uncaring? No, I've gone down this rabbit hole before online, it's not easy to hear some "outsider" talk critically of "your home." But just so you know, NYC is not your home - it's just a place. It's a collection of apartments on top of land and cement. The people come and go a lot there - and there has been a lot of change since the 90s. It's not the city you grew up in - whatever age that was. And it's a difficult concept to come to terms with. I am glad you stated your opinions, that was brave of you. Thank you.

March 10, 2015 at 7:11PM

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Ed David
Director of Photography
1426

Your perception of Manhattan will not be like mine just like I have no vision of what growing up in a suburb is like. So as a viewer and audience member of your work it is not exciting to hear negativity tossed at the place you call home. On a metaphysical and spiritual level no it is not my 'home' and unfortunately my post was driven off the initial chemical kick of disliking your tone in the narration. As far as concept goes I am fine with that and yes the landscape has changed drastically for better and worse in different pockets. But this is all taking away from your camera and work.... the color scenes looked really great and you did a lot of good visually with essentially a prosumer camera .....

March 11, 2015 at 12:25PM

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also I'm not going to do a full tutorial and show you 84 pages of notes and how to get skin tone right - if you want to learn color correction - Color Correction handbook is an amazing place to start - http://www.amazon.com/Color-Correction-Handbook-Professional-Techniques/... . This was more to show you what you can do with a cheap camera and even cheaper lens. It wasn't an advanced masterclass. I'm not a professional colorist either.

March 10, 2015 at 7:16PM, Edited March 10, 7:16PM

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Ed David
Director of Photography
1426

Nice grade, however branding the post as 4K is irrelevant as the resolution equivalent of this video is less than Super 16. Not bashin, was just expecting a camera demo based on the title.

March 11, 2015 at 10:40PM

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Steve-O
Director of Photography
184

Could you tell me what the master black levels
Saturation
Contrast
Color levels
And any other gamma setting were for this film

May 19, 2017 at 5:59PM

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