» Posts Tagged ‘sonyf65’

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Super Bowl 4K[As some of you might have heard, there's some kind of sporting match happening today, a big one apparently.] All jesting aside, the Super Bowl isn’t just an epic clash between the NFL’s two best teams. It’s also the absolute pinnacle of sports broadcast media, as both the league and Fox (among others) shell out incredible amounts of money to ensure that the production is as technologically advanced as current broadcast standards will allow. This year is no exception. As the Broncos and Seahawks go head to head today (go Broncos), the Fox Sports production team will be utilizing over 100 Sony cameras, several of which will be 4K, to ensure that we, the viewers, have the best seat in the house. Here’s a brief look at how it will all go down this afternoon. More »

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Oblivion, the new film starring Tom Cruise and shot on the Sony F65 by Claudio Miranda (with some RED EPIC for one of their practical effects), has only just launched into theaters, but we’ve got a tremendous amount of behind the scenes material already available online. The director, Joseph Kosinski, who was also at the helm for Tron: Legacy, wanted to use as many practical effects as possible for the film, and it certainly shows in many of the clips and videos available online. Check out the extensive BTS as well as an in-depth look at the sound design for the film courtesy of Michael Coleman and SoundWorks Collection. More »

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The Blender Foundation is constantly pushing the boundaries of availability, openness, and access to the raw materials it uses to create its ‘proof-of-Blender’ animated shorts. This type of access is usually more associated with open source software than filmmaking, but especially since the Project Mango live-action CGI/VFX-heavy  Tears of Steel was realized, that distinction has become increasingly blurred. Now filmmakers, animators, or compositors looking to cut their teeth on professional-grade material have access to the entirety of Tears of Steel‘s footage, in 4k OpenEXR (in the ACES color space), courtesy Xiph.org. In the meantime, the Foundation has also made available a number of resources concerning their post-production pipeline, which allowed them to transcode 4K Sony F65 footage to those Linux-workable OpenEXR frames. Check below for more details. More »

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Photo © David James, Universal PicturesLast month cinematographer Claudio Miranda, ASC, took home the Academy’s top prize for cinematography for his work on Ang Lee’s Life of PiHis forthcoming feature, Oblivion, will be the first major motion picture shot with the Sony F65, and he recently talked with Jon Fauer of Film and Digital Times Magazine about his experiences with the camera, as well as some of the interesting techniques that the production used in place of shooting with a blue screen. Check out the trailer and a special behind-the-scenes video for Oblivion below: More »

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The FOR-A 4K high-speed camera from FT-ONE didn’t get all that much attention when it was first announced, due in part to the fact that it’s probably going to be a rental only, but also because the name of both the company and the camera are easily confused and/or forgettable. No worries though, the camera does exist, and it’s capable of some pretty astounding frame rates at extremely high-resolution. It’s a specialty device for sure, but that doesn’t mean we can’t fantasize about using one, right? A Swiss company, Kamerawerk GmbH, put one to use in their recent No Sleep 4K music video (which they will be releasing as a 4K download), and they’ve posted a behind-the-scenes video showing the camera recording 4K at an astounding 860 frames per second, as well as another video showing off the rest of the production which is utilizing the Sony F65 as well. More »

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Some of you may have noticed something very, very interesting about the body designs of Sony’s upcoming F5 / F55 Cinealta cameras (they are, after all, nearly identical). These newcomers display something that the still rather-young F65, and for that matter, pretty much any other Sony cinema camera before now, has never featured (yes, aside from being shoulder-mount-friendly) — true modularity. Since its big announcement last week, Sony posted a video featuring Cinematography Product Specialist Richard Lewis demonstrating the level of modularity and extensibility built into the New F series — read on to check it out. More »

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As you likely already know, Sony has made some pretty major announcements recently, which we’ve been hard at work following, though pricing details are currently still under-wraps (likely because of a major price cut by RED). We do know that the F55 will be capable of on board 4K compressed shooting and 4K RAW with an external recorder, while that recorder will also enable 4K RAW capabilities with the on board 2K-capable F5, and bring a 2K RAW recording option to the FS700. Plus, further RAW resolution abilities are down the road for the F65, to be activated in conjunction with an upcoming firmware update. As far as handling some of this media goes, Sony has developed new AXSM media cards (for use in the external recorder module) as well as new XAVC codec technology for 4K shooting (among other things) — a lot to take in all told, we know. With all these details (and X’s, and A’s) flying around, it can be tough to see the importance of each one. Rest assured, though, that this new codec marks an important new step for Sony and its shooters. Read on to find out why, with some discussion of the F65′s future as well. More »

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So you just got hired onto a production as an AC or a Camera Operator, and you know that you have the knowledge, talent, and skill to produce some beautiful images. There’s just one problem: You’ve never laid a hand on the camera that’s being used in the production. It’s probably not going to look too good if you have to spend a lot of time fiddling around in the menus to find the settings you’re looking for, but not to worry. Canon just released a camera simulator for the C300, and there are also simulators available for the Arri Alexa, and the Sony F65: More »

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I was in the room at this year’s NAB when Sony revealed the F65, and one of my first thoughts was to wonder why it was called the F65 if the F35 was named because its sensor size matched that of 35mm film. With their announcement today that the F65 will retail for $65k, perhaps the camera was named because of target price? Strange. The F65 has the same size sensor as the F35, but upgrades the pixel count to a “true” 4K (I’m putting “true” in quotes because the F65 has a nonstandard pixel array that producers a resolution of 8768 x 2324). More »

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I’m not going to go into much detail on Sony’s new F65, which I covered at launch, or the new offerings in the ARRI ALEXA lineup, because cameras that run six figures aren’t exactly the purview of DIY filmmakers (though they’re nice to think about, at least as a rental). Briefly, here’s what I saw at NAB about the latter: the ALEXA has gotten a number of new features, upgrading it to Plus status — 3.5K ARRIRAW codec, 120FPS shooting mode in 2K (which was working fully on the camera I toyed with briefly), and iPad wireless camera control. There are also two new models — the ALEXA M, which separates the camera head from the recording body, and the ALEXA Studio, which has a mechanical shutter, optical viewfinder, and 4:3 sensor with anamorphic de-squeezing. And of course, Sony has their new F3. More »

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At their press event today at NAB, Sony demonstrated their previously previewed 8K camera and officially gave it a name: the CineAlta F65. When we’d last heard of this 8K camcorder, I’d assumed the high resolution was designed for the purpose of providing a full 4K image after de-bayering. But it turns out the sensor has dedicated green photosites for every pixel (unlike other bayer-pattern sensors, as far as I know), and thus Sony is designing the F65 for not only 4K, but beyond. More »