» Posts Tagged ‘stillmotion’

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Old Super8 cam

When many of us first picked up a camera, it was whatever we had lying around. Maybe it was dad’s old Super 8 at home or the Handycam in your high school yearbook class. It was available, affordable, and convenient, so the choice was already made whether you knew it or not. Today, however, there are a lot of cameras out there so naturally beginning filmmakers will ask themselves, “How do I choose a camera?”

This is a guest post by Joyce Tsang of Stillmotion. More »

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parallaxBack in November, we shared a great video tutorial by Joe Fellows that walked us through how to animate photos in After Effects by using the parallax 2.5D effect. Though the video received a warm response, there were a few questions raised, like how to stylize and texturize elements in the composition for example, which would in turn make the project look all the more profession and downright awesome. Fellows decided to make a follow-up tutorial that answers a few of those questions (some of which came right from NFS readers). Continue on to check out the video! More »

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Patrick-Moreau-Namibia-BTS3 WIDE

Here at No Film School, we’re massive fans of the fine folks over at Stillmotion. Day in and day out, they’re not only doing what they love (and doing it well) in order to make a living, but they’re also sharing everything they learn along the way on their blog and through their numerous workshops. For the past year or so, Stillmotion has been in the process of producing their first feature-length independent documentary, entitled #standwithme. Not only does the documentary itself look fantastic, but the way that it was funded, produced, and (will be) distributed breaks the mold, and it may very well set a new precedent for how independent films are made in the future. More »

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Still MotionOne of the post-production techniques I’ve yearned to know more about was animating still photos. We’ve seen this used in countless film intro sequences, and now motion graphics artist and director Joe Fellows shows us how to achieve this 3D effect in After Effects. By separating the background, mid, and foreground, you can animate your photos creating a parallax effect that will turn your simple 2D still images into moving 3D storytelling devices. Check out the tutorial after the jump. More »

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Stillmotion Lighting OutsideIt’s one of the clear-cut signs of amateur filmmaking: daytime exteriors that look terrible. This usually manifests itself in the form of harsh, blown out areas on the face of your talent, or as overly flat images in which there’s no separation of foreground from background. Avoiding these exterior lighting maladies doesn’t require an immaculate understanding of light, however. It just takes a basic understanding of a few simple concepts that are easy to put into practice. Read on to find out what these concepts are and how to start incorporating them into your work. More »

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Side by Side (Stillmotion/Marmoset Doc)

Art is a funny thing. As a form of personal expression, art, in its many forms, can be tremendously powerful and provide a sense of catharsis unlike anything else. However, when groups of people come together and creatively collaborate, something overwhelmingly powerful happens: a piece of content much larger than the individuals involved is born and takes flight. The product becomes a reflection of not only a time and a place, but an expression of what it means to be a human in that time and place. With this in mind, nofilmschool is proud to exclusively premiere a brand new short documentary from our peeps at stillmotion and Marmoset called Side by Side that celebrates the process of creative collaboration. More »

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Marmoset MusicFinding and licensing music for your film can be a bit, well, let’s just say that it makes violently tearing your hair out seem like a preferable alternative. Most music licensing sites force you to know what you’re looking for beforehand, which makes it quite difficult, if not impossible, to spontaneously find the right music for your film. Marmoset is different, in that it’s designed specifically for filmmakers who know how they want their stories to feel, but might not know which tunes or artists fit the bill. Read on to learn more about how Marmoset is revolutionizing the process of music licensing for filmmakers: More »

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SMAPPThe fine folks over at stillmotion have been providing the film community with awesome educational resources for the past couple of years; everything from tutorials on how to light an interview to how to get better handheld footage. One of their coolest resources, however, is SMAPP, the “stillmotion App.” It combines all of stillmotion’s killer tutorials with a set of story-driven interactive tools, which use input based on how you want your shot to look and feel in order to provide technical suggestions on how to achieve it. Now, a new version of SMAPP is available that adds new functionality to many of their old tools as well as some extremely helpful new ones. More »

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Patrick Moreau - stillmotionWhile any number of shoulder rigs and supports have come out in the last few years for DSLRs, some either don’t want the bulk, or need to stay quick or stealthy, and not call attention to themselves. Whatever the reason, if you’re finding yourself in this exact situation, there are a few techniques that can help you get much smoother-looking footage without a rig of any kind. More »

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The Canon C100 is an interesting addition to the Cinema EOS line. Available for about a month now, the camera spec-wise falls right in line with the Sony FS100, except it has ND filters and isn’t capable of anything higher than 30fps. It’s designed to be a budget camera from Canon — as it’s basically a shrunken C300 with a different internal codec — but it’s more than twice as expensive as the nearest somewhat-affordable and high-quality DSLRs, the Canon 5D Mark III and the Nikon D800. Many have now gotten their hands on one, so let’s take a look at some of the results, and check out some more real-world footage examples. More »

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The team over at stillmotion has come all the way from wedding films to producing Emmy Award-Winning television content, and along the way, they’ve done their part to try to teach as much as they can about their techniques and how to achieve professional-looking results. They eventually created the SMAPP App, which began its life as a low-cost app with quite a few in-app purchasable tutorials — now they’ve made it completely free, and in celebration, they are releasing a great low-budget tutorial we all can appreciate: how to light an interview with just $26 worth of equipment. More »

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We’ve covered plenty of tutorials before, but most recently, we featured a particularly useful interview lighting demonstration from stillmotion, which is designed to be a complement to their SMAPP iPhone application. This application was conceived to teach new filmmakers about all of the creative choices that going to making different types of videos. Embedded below we’ve got another tutorial, but this time instead of interview lighting, we are introduced to a deconstruction of creative film lighting and how different lighting setups can be used to enhance the mood of a scene. More »

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So you’re getting ready to interview that expert for your short documentary, and you want to review your interview lighting technique.  Or maybe you’re just looking for an introduction to lighting in general — where do you look?  Check out these two interview lighting tutorials — not only are they a great review of the basics, but they each do a great job of illustrating just how every light can help shape the subject and tone of  your footage: More »