» Posts Tagged ‘waveform’

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Digital Imaging Technician Harddrives [Photo by Christian Dressler]

This is part three of a 3-part series on the evolving role and responsibilities of the contemporary Digital Imaging Technician. Nofilmschool interviewed 4 working DITs from New York and L.A. to help contextualize the role they play and offer insights into the business. Part 1 went into misconceptions about DITs, part 2 offers information about getting hired — now this one is for the gear-head in all of us. Read on for a look into some tools and practices behind the job. More »

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waveform monitor histogram after effects adobeDepending on the acquisition system, waveform monitors and vectorscopes can guide quality control of your imagery from shooting all the way down the pipeline to grading, mastering, and compression for delivery. Scopes can seem a little intimidating and esoteric to the new user, but getting the basics down can really help in owning your image. Recently, Alexis Van Hurkman over at ProVideo Coalition has answered some key questions about scopes: find out which ones he considers the most indispensable below, plus when it may be a good idea to trust your own pair of eyes in making adjustments — even when your scopes are reading ‘A-Okay.’ More »

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Talk about your digital leatherman: The number of ridiculously handy — and practical, and portable, all in one — apps for filmmaking on mobile devices is probably one of the greatest tech-vantages we’ve got going for us these days second to low-cost high-res acquisition. Uses range from lighting plot diagramming and shooting scheduling all the way to Canon DSLR control via Android and RED control via iOS — there’s an app for all that, and more. Now, thanks to Adam Wilt of Pro Video Coalition (and a lot of other great stuff), your iPhone is now more of an asset on set than ever before — and that’s because his new $5 app Cine Meter turns your iOS device into a light meter, waveform monitor and false-color display. More »

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When Divergent Media’s Scopebox was released a few years ago, it was a $700 piece of software that was fairly unique at the time: a way to turn any Mac laptop into, well… a box of scopes. Waveforms, vectorscopes, and RGB parades were handy on-set aides, and though similar to Adobe OnLocation (now bundled as part of Premiere Pro), the fact that the forthcoming version 3.0 of the software will drop the price from $700 to $99 makes it a new ball game. More »