March 26, 2014

BMCC, Anamorphic, & Kickstarter: How the Beautiful Sci-Fi Short 'Prospect' Was Made

Back in 2012, we covered the Kickstarter for a short film called Prospect, which would eventually go on to premiere at this year's SXSW film festival. Besides using relatively inexpensive gear to create some fantastic visuals, the directing duo of Zeek Earl & Christopher Caldwell had quite a bit of help from enthusiastic volunteers who found out about the project after the Kickstarter campaign. The short film has finally been released to the public, and you can watch it below, and read about some of the lessons the team learned throughout the entire project.

Prospect is the coming-of-age story of a teenage girl on a toxic alien planet. She and her father hunt for precious materials, aiming to strike it rich. When the father is attacked by a roving bandit, the daughter must take control.

Here is a little background on how the film was made:

We shot Prospect out on Washington's Olympic Peninsula using two Black Magic Cinema Cameras (2.5k/RAW) over the course of four days. For glass we paired inexpensive Nikon Ai lenses and one Tokina 11-16 wide with a re-purposed Panasonic AG-LA7200 Anamorphic adaptor. The anamorphic adaptor required a whole range of huge diopters to properly focus at various distances. The amount of adapters, diopters, ND filters etc... on the rig was pretty ridiculous and shaky at times - but it got the job done and stayed pretty cheap. We powered the BMC's with Anton Bauer batteries, which though expensive are one of the best purchases we've ever made; they were 100% reliable and lasted for ages. We used a Small HD DP6 monitor which was able to adjust for an accurate anamorphic view. We edited in Adobe Premiere and graded in Resolve. All the "toxic dust" was shot in my basement and painstakingly layered on in After Effects which took weeks.

[This is a guest post from Zeek Earl & Christopher Caldwell]

After a year-and-a-half of developing our sci-fi short Prospect and screening to small film festival audiences, it’s incredibly satisfying to finally have the film online, out in the open. Like many indie film efforts, Prospect began on the internet with a Kickstarter campaign. To our surprise, the network of backers, press, and collaborators that came from this campaign was as (or possibly more) valuable than the funds raised.

The Numbers

We raised $21,298 from 338 backers based on an $18,000 goal. After fees and Kickstarter rewards costs, we were able to use $17,500 to make the film. We received an additional $5,000 grant from 4Culture in Seattle and pitched in the remaining money ourselves. The total cost of Prospect came close to $28,000. However, given the huge amount of volunteer time, labor, and talent donated to the effort, the actual cost would probably have been closer to $100,000. Full disclosure: we also run Shep Films, a small production company that had much of the necessary equipment to make the film.

Before the Kickstarter campaign, we had a core team of 6 people. Quickly after launching the campaign, we received a steady flow of emails from enthusiastic volunteers. Not only was it incredibly encouraging to have all this unsolicited passion hurled at the project, but it also gave us a great pool of talent to draw from. We assembled our 18-person crew largely from volunteers who reached out to us via Kickstarter. In addition, numerous valuable post-production services were offered including VFX and marketing from several groups including the awesome team at Gigantic Squid. Our campaign page, designed to solicit funding, actually became a powerful pitching tool to solicit collaboration, an effect we never intended, but was instrumental in making the film what it is today.

In addition to volunteers, the other unexpected side effect of the campaign was press. We did a lot of background hustle to get our campaign publicized in as many outlets as possible, but, again, our sights were set on funding. What we got was more powerful than just money. Our publicity efforts for the campaign continue to payoff as we publicize the film. We now have a roster of press contacts with a vested interest in the final film. When we cut the trailer, a number of publications immediately picked it up, generating buzz before our festival premiere. And now, with the online release of the finished film, we’re able to follow-up again. Getting attention on the internet often requires that big initial push just to get noticed. Because of our Kickstarter campaign, the ground-work had already been done.

In the spirit of this retrospective, here’s a few things that we feel contributed to the success of our campaign:

1. Be Prepared to Work

Developing and running a campaign is a lot of work. Crowdsourcing is not free money. Research other campaigns to see what’s worked. Put in time on the front end to develop your campaign’s video and other assets. Build a schedule. Reach out to press in advance of launch. You’re basically starting a small business. Make sure you’re prepared.

2. Don’t Be Entitled

Nobody owes you anything. Be gracious. And, most importantly, put in the effort to prove why you won’t waste anyone’s money. We focused our efforts into a concept reel for the film. We invested in creating some initial costumes and props and shot test footage on location. This served as a sign of our commitment and a demonstration of our ability to execute. And it also ended up functioning as a pre-trailer to the film, getting people excited about the film’s aesthetic.

3. Create Compelling Content Around the Campaign

We didn’t think that the pitch would be compelling enough just by itself. While we had a lot of great assets – concept art, design prototypes, even actual props and test footage -- we wanted to do everything we could to create additional content around the campaign, disguising the plea for money in a bunch of stuff that was interesting in its own right. A local artist illustrated a poster for the film. We released behind the scenes documentaries. We created a super-contained companion short to deepen the world of Prospect. We released our previous short film In The Pines online. And we were active in the comments in places like Reddit and here on No Film School.com to be transparent about our development process for those who were interested.

All in all, through Kickstarter we created a community around our film that made it much bigger and better than we had even planned. And the big surprise was that the payoff came more in the form of people than money -- people who were interested in helping us make our film and people who were interested in watching our film. For a couple of guys who did not go to film school and don’t live in a hub of filmmaking, we were able to create opportunity on our own terms that would have been impossible just a few years ago.

Links:


Zeek Earl - Christopher Caldwell - Bio PhotoChristopher Caldwell (left) and Zeek Earl (right) are based in Seattle, WA where they founded their production company SHEP Films. Their first short film, In The Pines, premiered at SXSW in 2012. Prospect, which premiered at SXSW 2014, is their second film together.

Your Comment

120 Comments

Congratulations on your beautiful film. May I ask why did you choose to release it online straight after the festival premiere and not try out VOD or other distribution strategies first?

March 26, 2014 at 12:18PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

4
Reply

At this stage of our career it's much more important for us to have as many people see our film as possible. Our goal is to make a feature film and hopefully we can use all the online attention we get as leverage for financing.

March 26, 2014 at 12:44PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply

Id love to hear more about there experience shooting with the Blackmagic?

March 26, 2014 at 12:22PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

5
Reply
Gavin

I would also be very interested in hearing more about the using the camera.

March 26, 2014 at 12:25PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

1
Reply
Curtis

Is there anything specific you guys would like to know? I really love the camera. We had no glitches or problems when we treated them nicely. The file sizes are massive and it was tight on time in terms of dropping footage and then backing it up. We should have had more SSDs to make that less stressful. I love the color and texture of the camera. The only downside was that it felt restrictively tight when we were shooting the interior tent scenes. The Metabones speed booster wasn't out for the BMC back then; I have it now and love the camera even more now that it's closer to a 35mm look.

March 26, 2014 at 12:49PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

9
Reply

It looks fantastic. Did you shoot RAW or ProRes?

March 26, 2014 at 10:46PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Andrew

which asa did you setup the blackmagi camera?

July 18, 2014 at 10:33PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
yukio

Rather enjoyed it. Had very nice colours and production design. Although at times the shakey camera and anamorphic blur was a little distracting, overall a very nice piece of work. I wonder what is next for this team.

March 26, 2014 at 12:23PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Curtis

not bad but it was more like an scene..

March 26, 2014 at 12:34PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

3
Reply
sebastian

Ahh the good ol Panasonic la 7200. Gosh I missed the days that anamorphic adapter was sold for cheap. Great but. Very great looking film. Congratulations.
I have more of apersonal question to the filmmakers: did they have apprehensions spending 28,000 on a short as opposed to going for a full length feature. I am battling spending a significantly large amount of money (relative to my project) but trying to decide if it's rather justifiable to stretch it for my feature script
Gorgeous images in the short btw

March 26, 2014 at 12:45PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
t. cal

That's a fair question. We definitely didn't intend to spend that much from the get-go, but I can't think of any costs we could of cut. For us, this is the first step to making a feature film in the same vein that will require even bigger and crazier production design and that will cost waaaay more than $28k. We're in talks with producers and financiers now, and the short film will hopefully earn their trust and get us a much bigger amount of money.

March 26, 2014 at 12:58PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

4
Reply

Thanks for the reply. Very generous of your time. You guys have what it takes to make it big. Good luck

March 26, 2014 at 2:23PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
t. cal

Zeek, how tough was it to film on the Peninsula? And were you going for a "Gravity"-esque feel? It feels like "Gravity" if Bullock had landed on a strange planet. Great work!!!

March 26, 2014 at 1:07PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Chris

The funny thing about filming in the rain forest was that it was supposed to rain the entire time we were there, and instead ended up being freakishly sunny. We had planned for rain including building custom rain gear for all the equipment. With the crazy weather change we decided to film at dawn and dusk instead... so the challenged turned from escaping the wet to having to get up really early. It was a lot of driving and long days, but it was such an incredibly beautiful place to hang out in we didn't mind at all.

March 26, 2014 at 1:13PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply

Zeek! Thanks for the reply! And check your email!

March 26, 2014 at 1:21PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Chris

Why not a feature? With all the advancements in movie making tools and a very small but kind of doable budget. I don't see why so many aspiring film makers are still going the short film rout. I'm not saying the short film doesn't have a place. But fifteen years ago with the expense of film and processing and having to pay for edit and color post work, because very few people owed the equipment then, It wasn't like today where everyone has a NLE and resolve on their laptops. The sheer difficulty of the technical side of making a movie back in the day gave rise to the short film. Most of those barriers have been obliterated with the digital revolution. I'm not just throwing stones, I went that rout and made a short and I wish I would have just put in more effort in the beginning and done a shorter feature. Is the short film still relevant if you aspire to be a feature film maker?

March 26, 2014 at 1:15PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

6
Reply
CC

I think it is. We couldn't make a feature version of Prospect for under $200k... tactile/real production design is a huge part of what we want to do and it simply takes time and money to build stuff. The short film is helping us get access to larger financing.

March 26, 2014 at 1:37PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

5
Reply

Production costs are still very expensive even now that the shooting and editing costs are now more reasonable. Feeding a small cast and crew properly can get expensive quickly on long weekend shoots, and that's just the bare minimum.

March 26, 2014 at 1:58PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Marc B

You can shoot a feature on 28K. Maybe not THIS feature. From my experience aiming to make a feature, even a very simple feature could get you closer to to the goal of making feature films.. if that is the goal. If you've been to a film festival or even on youtube lately you'll see that short film are a dime a dozen. These guys are smart they are reaching out on the web, and maybe have different goals or motivations. But to aspiring film makers out there I would say if your going to do it... go all the way. A short is good for showcasing talents, no doubt. But a feature you can sell, and it shows investors you can handle the full scope of the work.

- advise from random internet guy

March 26, 2014 at 2:21PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
CC

I did my feature for $10k. Just takes a long time and you have to do everything yourself. spacetruckerbruce.com

The Black Magic Cameras do complicate things as they need many TB of hard drive space to store the RAW video. that and a computer fast enough to run Resolve.

March 27, 2014 at 5:43PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply

Congratulations. I also took a look at your short film In The Pines and was wondering if you could give just a few details about the kit and technique for the close-up of the ant, thanks.
http://vimeo.com/53532069

March 26, 2014 at 1:50PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

7
Reply
Saied

March 26, 2014 at 1:51PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

3
Reply

I'm in preproduction for a feature I'm hoping to pull off for around $25K... We'll see how it goes, maybe I'll do a writeup about it when I'm done. I hope you get your financing on the merit of this project. If you crowd fund the feature, I'll throw a bit in the hat.

March 26, 2014 at 1:52PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
CC

sorry this was meant to be a reply to a comment from Zeek

March 26, 2014 at 1:53PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
CC

Thanks! Best of luck... there's some pretty cool features that get made in that budget range

March 26, 2014 at 1:58PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply

I met the filmmakers that made the film that won this year's SXSW Film Fest - Fort Tilden - they wrote, produced, shot and completed their feature in a fraction of the time it took us to make Prospect and it's great!

March 26, 2014 at 2:00PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply

Well, this is a nice effort but truly a waste, considering the end result is mediocre and all that money wasted on a short film when he could've made a feature film. A real success story is a spanish film called Musgo by Gami Orbegoso, also featured here on nofilmschool a while back. Shot on a GH2 with nikon and tokina lens, graded in colorista in adobe premiere pro and with a budget of less than 5k. And that was a feature film that looks nothing like it was shot on GH2, even though the film itself wasn't that good but the filmmaking is strong and a better success story than this one. And that guy didn't go to film school either. So, to me, this is wasted effort on a mediocre film with expensive equipment and lot of crew thrown in. Musgo was shot by 1 guy, think about it. That guy proved it's the filmmaker not the tools. Give the tools these guys had to the Musgo filmmaker and I'm sure he'd make an even superior film. Check it out here: http://vimeo.com/45596420

March 26, 2014 at 2:39PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

5
Reply
man

Don't be that guy, man. Musgo sounds like quite the achievement, but it and Prospect are 2 complete different animals. From what I can see from the 5min that you posted, Musgo has a much more simple (not a bad thing) straight forward style to it (again, not a bad thing). Prospect had a great deal of world building that, in my opinion, warrants a higher budget. Sure, it could have been made for less money, and perhaps its could have had a longer run time, but when all is said in done, I watched a 13min short film that left me satisfied and inspired. I don't care how much money a film costs as long as I feel the way I did after I finished watching Prospect.

March 26, 2014 at 3:24PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
CoolHandLuque

Well, that's all nice and stuff but if you watch the whole of Musgo and watch the 13 minute Prospect you will know what I mean. The overall impact is different. Prospect left me saying "That's it? Haven't I seen this before?" feeling, which is not good when so much money and so much time is spent on a short film and I wasn't even emotionally satisfied. Whereas Musgo makes you marvel at what was achieved with so little even though the film itself is poorly written but the filmmaking left me more inspired and want to go out and make a film of my own. Musgo looked like it was shot with the budget of Prospect. That's just me. I just like it when so much praise goes to something mediocre or average when something great like Musgo or Upstream Color get little attention and both done with cheaper cameras and gear. I understand Musgo and Prospect are two different beasts and I saw potential in Prospect but the end result left me underwhelmed not satisfied. Just my opinion.

March 26, 2014 at 3:36PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

8
Reply
man

*I just don't like it when so much...*

March 26, 2014 at 3:37PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

5
Reply
man

Not sure what your definition of less attention is, as I remember there being quite a bit of info/buzz regarding Upstream Color...I was even able to see it in theaters here in Cleveland, OH. That does not happen unless a film has a little bit of buzz behind it. I thoroughly enjoyed the experience of that film, much as I did with Prospect.

This article doesn't feel like an unwarranted puff piece, but rather a logical conclusion to a previous article NFS did back when the Prospect kickstarter was running.

To each their own I guess. After 13min of Prospect, I would totally see more of what these guys produce. Conversely, after watching 5min of Musgo, I do not really have a desire to see the rest of the product. It sounds like a great story with how it was made, but the subject matter and style I saw in the first 5 min did not appeal to my sensibilities. *shrug*

March 26, 2014 at 4:15PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
CoolHandLuque

Yea, that's what I'm saying. Filmmakers behind upstream color distributed everything on their own without any backing from any studio they went full independent and they made great profit, and Shane Caruth never went to film school and he didn't use kickstarter to waste people's money on some film school project. In fact, he even said he would never use kickstarter in the future for his movies and he shot that movie in GH2, so that's something to talk about and praise. By "Attention" I meant Musgo. It didn't get that much attention as Prospects is getting here. Prospects bored me with the lack of imagination and weak execution on an idea that had potential. If it focused on characters amidst that setting and emotionally invested me, those 13 minutes would be better than a feature length cuz so much would've been expressed in such a short time, but it featured amateur acting at best. Anyway, my point is though this is a good effort, we shouldn't praise it like it's something groundbreaking, especially considering those other two "Feature Films" shot on GH2 achieved so much without resorting to Kickstarter or Festival support. If Prospects were made on GH2 or a lesser camera with as much money as Musgo, I would've been impressed technically. I bet most people here like it cuz it was shot on Blackmagic Camera.

March 26, 2014 at 5:02PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
man

You're saying the Musgo film was poorly written and basically wasn't a good movie but you liked the fact it looked good and was done by one person? Doesn't make much sense. There are no rules and no one situation as every film is different. To do movies of any length correctly where you don't have to rush or do everything yourself is gonna cost money. Filmmaking is about collaboration and teamwork, anybody can pick up a camera and shoot but can that one person direct performers, hold a boom mic, create costumes, sets, focus the camera, slate, feed the crew, find the funding, edit the film, create the music, write the script, find the actors, locations, i highly doubt it and if there is 1-5 guys doing all that then something is gonna get sacrificed. To me paying attention to all the details and making sure everything is done the right way the first time is more then half the battle and to ensure that happens you need a team of people you can trust, money and some great dedicated actors. This short film is great and i got an instant emotional response from the stroy and characters not by how it was shot or what went on behind the scenes as that's irrelevant when you are in the audience watching the actual film. Taking the short film route to hone your skills and show that you can create and execute a film and possibly get it turned into a feature is a great path to take.

March 27, 2014 at 4:25AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Brad Watts

Well said. I feel the merit of shorts have recently been diminished with so many micro budget features coming out. There is something very satisfying about watching a well made short film.

March 27, 2014 at 8:35AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

7
Reply
CoolHandLuque

Hi Zeek! beautifully shot!! I loved it! Though I'm a sucker for scifi like this.
Smallest of "complaint" if you want to call it that. The small purple particles weren't always tracked in 3d in the shots. So, for example when she would run during an extended shot, the particles just chilled out on the screen, instead of going past the camera. Noticed that throughout and was a bit distracting.

Honestly, it's just nitpicking because everything else was gorgeous! Kudos!

March 26, 2014 at 2:43PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Josiah

Thanks Josiah. I'm sure any effects pro will find a million things wrong with how I did the particles - I definitely did them myself and did not really know what I was doing. The thing is we didn't want to use any 3D CGI... we wanted to use real dust for the texture of it, so they're all 2D layers of dust shot in my basement. For those tracking shots I tried to increase the scale of the 2D layers as the camera went through them in an attempt to match the motion. I would actually genuinely love to hear any ideas on how to do this better!

March 26, 2014 at 2:55PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply

Thanks for writing back! And I admire the plan to stay away from 3d entirely! Definitely a fun goal to set! And hey, if you are asking for tips, this is how I would do it (I think).

You could track the scene you want to use with After Effects. (right click on the clip in AE, and click "track camera") Once the scene is tracked, you can use that data to insert your particles into the scene. Just add the particle layer, and set the layer to 3d. And just duplicate and position the layers to the desired location. You could even rotate the layerson the x and y axis to change it up. But from that point on, the whole layer will move in xy&z with the motion of the camera shot. There are probably other ways of doing it, but off the top of my head, that's how I would approach the idea! If nothing else, maybe at least tracking the x&y would be enough to help sell it using motion tracking.

Anyways, don't know how well you personally know AE, and if this makes sense or helps at all? But just a thought. Hehe. And like I said before, stellar work regardless!!

March 26, 2014 at 3:40PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Josiah

Thanks! Appreciate the pointers

March 26, 2014 at 4:10PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply

Beautiful!!! I want to see the Feature Film!

Also, Chris and Zeke can you post a few ungraded frame grabs to get a better sense of what the Black Magic gave you before you did your own magic? Thank you and Good Work!

March 26, 2014 at 2:56PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Ko

Thanks. There's some screenshots up at http://shepfilms.com/prospect

March 26, 2014 at 2:59PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

5
Reply

Funny how easy it is to waste that much money and sell mediocrity. Not dissing or anything, it was a nice try but it was just a student film with more money in it. Seriously, people praising here makes me wonder. I mean watch that spanish film shot for under 5k on GH2 by just 1 guy and 1 camera and it's a feature film and tell me that's not a better filmmaking and better champion for independent filmmakers than this kickstarter money wasted film school student project? Musgo may not be the best film but if you watch what the guy was able to do with his incredible filmmaking and with so little money, this short film feels insignificant and waste of time. Even the plot and execution is boring and cliched. Just a like a film school student film. I admire the effort but not the result that's being praised here.

March 26, 2014 at 3:18PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
man

I guess you mean Musgo.
http://nofilmschool.com/2013/02/panasonic-gh2-shane-carruth-upstream-col...
The makers are not in competition and are cut from the same cloth. They actually delivered and were good enough to share the experience to help others. Sure, there may be a tactical element of publicity and networking, but I think a certain grace should be given when people achieve things.

March 26, 2014 at 3:47PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Saied

But you can't deny one has achieved more than the other by wasting less money and time.

March 26, 2014 at 3:50PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
man

To be fair I watched the first 2 minutes of Musgo and was bored shitless.. so bored that I didn't want to watch the rest of the first 5 minutes. Way too long intro with... well pretty pictures, but no content or introduction to the story. May be pretty looking and all, but that just doesn't cut it when you want to capture your audience.
If you just fill it out with "empty" pictures with no relation to the story... it is quite easy to make it a full feature. Of course can't tell what the entire movie is like, but then again I don't think I'd want to from what I saw. In my world that is a much worse crime, wasting ppl's time and money on something long and boring, than on something shorter but entertaining.

With Prospect I was caught instantly, and would love to see more.

The story on Prospect could perhaps be more thoroughly produced, and given that extra care for the script, specially in the ending, but I really enjoyed and was captured by the feel and setting in this...strange world. Well done guys. It's brave to take on the sci-fi genre on low-budgets, nomatter what.

March 28, 2014 at 9:33PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Lasse

Wow, you already made this exact comment further up the thread. No need to be so upset.

March 26, 2014 at 4:48PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
JoshBroban

Exact comment? did you even read what I wrote?

March 26, 2014 at 5:04PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

2
Reply
man

Exact comment? did you even read what I wrote? No need to be so defensive of this film. Someone has to point out the mediocrity here.

March 26, 2014 at 5:05PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

6
Reply
man

Hey Zeek. I really liked the color correction. Can you tell me why you stayed away from blacks, or at least deep blacks, in the image? Seems to be a trend these days and normally I don't like it but it worked here.
Thanks!

March 26, 2014 at 3:36PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Nick

Thanks. We were going for a grainy sort of 70s look and super high contrast didn't feel right. Also it was just a natural bi-product of layering all the dust on. Because the dust was real footage of dust and not CGI, the particles where not perfectly isolated from background.Mmuddying up the image with all that floating crap reduced the contrast.

March 26, 2014 at 3:46PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

4
Reply

From a business/accounting viewpoint, did you do this all under your company Shep Films, otherwise are there any admin hassles to beware in borrowing equipment from your company and accounting for it on a private project ?

March 26, 2014 at 3:52PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

8
Reply
Saied

We did it all under Shep Films, which is generally not a good idea because it puts liability on us. But because the financing was crowd sourced and we don't plan on making any money off the short, it shouldn't be a problem. For a feature film we would definitely need to start a new company.

March 26, 2014 at 4:06PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

1
Reply

Most of the people on this blog just missed one of the most important pieces of advice on this piece!
If you're going to be in the film business staying on top of the tax and accounting issues (especially if you have outside money) is one of the MOST IMPORTANT THINGS YOU CAN DO.

/just got high fived by Legal & Accounting.

March 26, 2014 at 10:00PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
marklondon

the most important question for filmmakers today is "how?"
if they know "how?" only than they think about "what?"
and the most important question "what for?" is never asked nor answered

March 26, 2014 at 4:10PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
guest

Visually the quality of this is really, really, good! You guys really make the BMCC shine. But I don't know if a $17,500 budget is represented here. The story is kinda slow boring. Nothing really happens and 85% of it is them just walking around... with a build up for nothing really...

March 26, 2014 at 4:59PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

3
Reply

It's simply because it was poorly written, characters not focused on and I think most of the money went to equipment to achieve the look than story or character or even decent acting. This would've been great if it focused on deep characters with top notch acting against that backdrop and setting but like you said the story went nowhere and acting was amateur and characters were hardly developed and what you see is a film school project wasting kickstarter money. I'm surprised people are even praising this here.

March 26, 2014 at 5:10PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

2
Reply
man

I think you've made your point, but we've covered both Upstream Color and Musgo, so I don't know what you're getting at there.

http://nofilmschool.com/tag/upstreamcolor/

http://nofilmschool.com/2013/02/panasonic-gh2-shane-carruth-upstream-col...

March 26, 2014 at 5:14PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
avatar
Joe Marine
Camera Department

I'm simply expressing my opinion here. I mean this short film is getting too much attention without pointing out mistakes or flaws and the overall results achieved with so much money. Nobody here is saying anything negative, they're all praising whereas on Musgo or Upstream Color boards I saw people dissing those films, why's that? Also, I just don't like the idea of wasting crowdfunded money on projects as insignificant as this. If it were a feature film that would've been amazing regardless of other issues. But it's just a 13 minute expensive film school student project that leaves you underwhelmed. I understand this site is dedicated to independent filmmakers everywhere but we should cover topics that feature groundbreaking results in indie filmmaking, not bit projects like these that are better off on vimeo than high profile festivals and websites like these. I've loved everything you guys cover but this just rubbed me the wrong way to feature this project here. Especially cringe when I read that it's kickstarter funded? I mean this is the best you can do with so much of people's money?

March 26, 2014 at 5:31PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

4
Reply
man

I think I know what your saying. This is NOT a short film. It's a scene/trailer for the feature. It is not a complete story in and of itself but rather a to-be-continued kickstarter-funded calling card for their feature. With such a large budget I would expect a lot more than that. So many shorts are following this trend now-a-days, it's effective but misleading. It is possible to tell a complete story in a short. This short's story is unsatisfying and incomplete.

March 26, 2014 at 7:41PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

3
Reply
Stephen

And the issues should have been picked up at the script stage. Someone should have pointed out that nothing happens for ever with no feeling of jeopardy or tension. You don't have to have written much to catch these things.

March 29, 2014 at 9:00PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

3
Reply
Steve

This guy is really pissed about something lol I lost count on how many times he brought up the same thing and tried to belittle the creators of this film smh it's really not necessary.

March 27, 2014 at 3:53PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

4
Reply
Brad Watts

I think it is also about respecting the gauntlet. I could argue that my film will be better, disingenuously safe in the knowledge that it is just a fantasy in my head at the present time. If I wanted to pour water on their film, surely the challenge is always there to go one better. To bring one's own project to fruition from the corner of the mind into the real world, and open to the critique of others is no small thing, especially if those comments are harsh. Hence, with this article I think it is better to nurse the creative gene over the critical one.

March 26, 2014 at 5:23PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

2
Reply
Saied

Agreed. But not when it's a project like this. There are far more talented, less fortunate indie filmmakers that deserve attention and the money these guys had. I can imagine the same bland, poorly written, amateurish effort if they were given feature film budget. There are other greater sci-fi shorts I've seen on vimeo with more talent and some without any budget with more creativity and originality than this. The fact this is getting more attention outside of vimeo and the fact that it is kickstarter funded and the results so underwhelming, that's what's getting me all worked up.

March 26, 2014 at 5:38PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
man

Not to be too much of a schoolmarm here, but...

"man", I encourage you to fund and make a short or feature yourself. I used to make the same types of comments on shorts and films I didn't think deserved the praise or attention they were receiving. Then I made a short myself. And it was so much harder than I ever thought possible. Nothing prepares you for leaving the fantasy in your head and smashing headfirst into the brick wall of reality.

I put it online and received a smattering of people who liked it and people who didn't. Of course, it's the harshest comments that stick with you the longest. It's an incredibly vulnerable thing to put something you worked so hard on out into the world. And people have every right to react to it however they see fit. It just goes with the territory, if you can't handle it, there's no point in ever creating anything.

But keep in mind, it's awfully easy to poop on someone's work for the comfort of your web browser. I would encourage you to put that essentially wasted energy of criticizing others to better use. Go make your own thing. Not only will you have something to really contribute, you'll also become, as all of us who take up arms and actually make something, a much humbler, kinder human being.

March 26, 2014 at 6:07PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Kevin H.

Couldn't have said it better myself, Saied. Great point.

March 26, 2014 at 5:46PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Kevin H.

Well, is it really wrong as a cinema lover and indie film supporter to criticize things that aren't worth praising. I might be no filmmaker but I have deep respect for filmmakers with great talent and originality and especially those who do it all on their own without outside support or financining, hence my undying love for Musgo and Upstream Color. I'm just another moviegoer or someone interested in the world of filmmaking especially the little man going up against the big guns and producing same quality as the big guns. But when I see stuff like Prospects being praised especially when it had so much funding help and festival boost, and the result is so mediocre, it pains me to see and imagine what those other more talented more original filmmakers could've done. I agree with your points but I can't support something like Prospects. Just my opinion.

March 26, 2014 at 6:14PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
man

"We’re all here for the same reason: to better ourselves as writers, directors, cinematographers, producers, photographers... whatever our creative pursuit. Criticism is valuable as long as it is constructive... We’re all here to help each other, so thank you for adding to the conversation!"

If you have advice man, give it. The key word in constructive criticism is CONSTRUCTIVE. I can't even watch the film because of network restrictions right now, but if you're posting please give consideration to the good in the film, the bad, the average and the awesome. Just going off about your opinion may feel good to vent (believe me, I LOVE venting about what I consider crap) but please be a bit more constructive, this is someone's work and passion. Keep that in mind.

+1 Saied.

I also feel like some films that would be great are slammed because people think they could have been made for less... To jump into animation, Tangled cost upwards $250 Million. I don't know why... I wasn't there at their budget meetings so it's not my place to say. to me it seems ridiculous. But I still thoroughly enjoyed the movie!

Great job Zeek, even though I can't watch it right now the stills look awesome!

March 26, 2014 at 6:53PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

6
Reply
Kent

Nice visuals :)
Here is my crowdfunding campaign: http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/kontinuum
Please contribute and support.
Thanks :)

March 26, 2014 at 5:09PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Moosa Saleem

Do you guys still have the budget proposal? I saw the link for it on kickstarter but the link was dead. I'd be interested to see what it looks like and how much things were estimated to cost.

March 26, 2014 at 5:12PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
evan

That's weird, not sure where that file went. We definitely under-budgeted production design... and most the labor was even donated. And there things we didn't anticipate like transportation costs where much higher. The cheap radios we were planning on using were too shitty and we had to rent nice ones... things add up quickly.

March 26, 2014 at 5:30PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

5
Reply

I'd be interested in seeing this too. Cause really I think this could have been done for less than $5k (being modest here), especially if you guys are already filmmakers and can call in favors and rent equipment.

While this looks beautiful, this is a clear example of why content is king. A better story and acting shot and this could have been shot on anything.

A friend of mine shot a similarish sci-fi short back in 2007... which I feel is much stronger than this for around $2,000 I think. It was a finalist in Steven Spielberg's FOX show On the Lot. You can watch it here: https://vimeo.com/10344356

March 26, 2014 at 5:43PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

6
Reply

Now that's impressive. That film looks so much more intriguing than this one. At least it shows that the filmmakers tried on Anthem. I didn't get anything from Prospects, especially watching it the 3rd time. The mediocrity stands out even more.

March 26, 2014 at 6:21PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
man

It sounds like you just want to hate this film! A grudge? Lets critique some of your creative output...

March 26, 2014 at 11:54PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

3
Reply
Nick

My friend Marko Slavnic did a pretty cool sci-fi short that was just awarded a "vimeo staff pick."

It's more of a fast paced sci-fi than "Prospect." I can appreciate both styles. https://vimeo.com/87307121

March 26, 2014 at 5:32PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply

Agreed. That's what I was talking and ranting about. Far more talented individuals with no financial backing but with more originality on Vimeo than this kickstarter funded "Short Film" that got big boost in a major festival. I can't believe people are praising this rather than highlighting the problems and the amateurish effort here.

March 26, 2014 at 6:24PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

10
Reply
man

Welcome to the real film business my friend: storytelling talent is good, ability to generate buzz is as good if not better. :-)
If you have both? Well, Harvey Weinstein would like a word.

/Both films are fine by me BTW. The more the merrier.
/Your vociferous posting isn't just some weird GH2 trolling is it? Scientology could learn from you lot.

March 26, 2014 at 10:07PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
marklondon

You are THAT guy! Stop trolling and let people do the art they want to do. There is a lot of work that goes into these movies, a lot of time, sweat and passion. more than you would probably ever know. Having said that you don't have to like it but you do have to accept it because you have no choice :)

I can name thousands of shorts better than Musgo, does that make that movie any less worthy of existing.

March 26, 2014 at 11:33PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

2
Reply
Dimi

Nicely shot, nice props, I think, and generally good if people are brave enough to pursue a project and get it done. I didn't really like the script, though - the film ends where the story in fact seems to get off the ground, literally. No offense, guys, I think script, timing and acting need improvement. Better luck next time, you certainly know how to find your images for a story, but for my taste there were too many moments that felt unconvincing, including the general idea from what point to what point you tell the story. That's what I would say when leaving the cinema, just an opinion of a person in the audience.

March 26, 2014 at 5:48PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

4
Reply
domul

Appreciate the feedback.

March 26, 2014 at 5:57PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply

Nice short, good stuff. Black Magic looks cinematic, no doubt about it. Bravo.

March 26, 2014 at 6:19PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

9
Reply
ADC

Looks like "Deliverance from Another Planet" (TM).

March 26, 2014 at 7:34PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
DLD

Congrats all around on a well done short. Being PNW based myself I know the challenges of shooting outdoors here. You guys gota crazy super bonus with the dry weather. Good stuff. Looking forward to seeing more from y'all in the future.

March 27, 2014 at 3:14AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
keith

@Man You may not know it, but you are coming off as an asshole... Excessive commenting on how "this person is not as good as this person" is poor taste. You are not changing anyone's mind, and as someone who has an opinion, you seem to force it like its everyone else's opinion. Its fine not to like something, its fine to say so, but its counter intuitive to your argument to go around commenting how bad the film makers behind Prospect are in more then a few posts in the same article. Some how a group of people making something they believed and succeeded in finishing, and possibly making a full feature with this short, is a bad thing?

Musgo looks fantastic, Upstream Colors looks amazing, and so does this. How is putting down these film makers productive? Especially with out any constructive criticism except "These guys are not as good as *this person*, why is everyone giving these guys attention???" Please stop, we get it.

- - -

Good short guys, i am the one to prefer slower paced scifi and i really appreciate that you went the extra step in using anamorphic rather then just cropping the frame in post. It goes that extra step in making it feel more authentic. I think the handheld was what pulled me out at some moments, its fine with some scenes like following the lead character when she was on pursuit but with a simple conversation it pulled me out and made the conversation feel awkward, a weird tension to the scene. Also the ending was a bit abrupt to me in comparison to the way the rest of the short was paced. The quick cut to black and Title with the score glaring was a bit off putting as it left me with a feeling that this ending doesnt fit the rest of the short. Its too punchy and leaves me thinking I was suppose to get more from the short like a message, but it was lost on me.

I see potential, and do look forward to what you guys do next and good luck on a possible feature, I'd watch it.

March 27, 2014 at 4:31AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

7
Reply
Xiong

Thanks for sharing your project Zeek. I think some people have been overly critical, whilst there are things that could be improved in the film (for me the performance of the father, the script) there are some huge strengths. A strong female lead, some great, genuinely tense and well choreographed set-pieces and a surprising ending.

I've just made an Indie feature in the UK for ($17,000) and it's really hard. It's a drama, so very cheap production design and locations. I think crowd funded genre films are a really great calling card, for finding an audience, for getting some feedback and developing a longer narrative film.

It's easy for people to knock people, but I enjoyed the film and think it shows great promise for a feature-length story. Amazing costume on the villain as well. I'll be looking out for the feature length!

March 27, 2014 at 6:01AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply

This has been one of the most fascinating threads recently. I have been dwelling on Man's comments and offer further observations because I think even the face-on criticisms can be turned into positive lessons.

1) At $28,000 the film simply cost too much for what is shown on the screen.

Regarding the mysterious budget cost breakdown, in Zeek's own words, "That’s weird, not sure where that file went".

It took me a while to realise, but that is a completely class act from Zeek. He did this through his company, which brings it's own headaches. Sometimes the taxman might issue a bill based on what he thinks is the value of an asset as opposed to what it actually cost you. It is therefore surely in Zeek's interest to spend as little as possible but declare the highest legal allowances possible to avoid getting hammered with an excessive bill.

I think what is happening here is that everyone naturally looks to the absolute minimum possible cost to make a film (though what might cost your friend to make you a spacesuit for $100 might cost me $1000). So if the budget sheet turns up, the figures might look like wastage to us but actually make sense in the real business world. I believe Warner Brothers have been declaring a loss on Harry Potter films for pretty much the same reason.

2) How dare they take money from others and over-hype.

Many people seem to complete a film and consider an audience afterwards. Finance and marketing are probably the most necessary skills for the future. For example, I wish to make a film, but am more wary of negotiations down the line than shooting the film itself. The people chose to donate, and these guys did deliver The long game probably resembles a tortoise on the net over the hare's natural ability.

3) But the film is very mediocre compared to Musgo, Upstream Color, Gravity (couldn't resist !), etc.

That is actually the icing on the cake, because it offers hope that you do not have to make your best film to establish yourself, as long as you pay attention to those wider components. The fact that X, Y and Z film-maker didn't quite make it with a better film shows how vital that additional awareness really is to widen one's.....Prospects.

March 27, 2014 at 8:20AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Saied

Well said.

March 27, 2014 at 10:00AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Kent

I love the internet: 80 comments later we have a conspiracy theory! This is all very bizzare to me because we were actually the lowest budget short in our block at SXSW. I would say the average budget was around $50k. In many other countries you can get huge grants from the government to make short films- there was one from Canada that had a budget of $120k - yes, for a short film.

Let me give you a few examples of where our money went:
Actors: $1700 - we werent comfortable asking our actors to work for free given the commitment of this project
Food: $2400 - no fancy catering company, just two friends cooking for free.
Transportation and lodging: $2980 - we all stayed in a big cabin together to save money, some camped
Insurance: $2000 - we had explosive and dozens of people out in the forest, I definitely wanted to be covered
Squibs: $1100 - wanted to hire a pro cuz safety
Props/prod design: $12,000 - thats with much of the labor being donated

March 27, 2014 at 10:35AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply

Zeek, I was praising your achievement, not criticising. Congratulations again.

March 27, 2014 at 10:40AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Saied

I appreciate criticism Saied, but you were accusing us of using the film as a tax haven.

March 27, 2014 at 3:57PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

4
Reply

Did I ? Sorry, no accusations intended. Others were curious about the budget proposal, so I tried to make a general point that it would be good for anyone (including me) to consider any savings possible from offsetting a budget from any tax allowances, though I appreciate these varies from country to country.

If at all possible could you please publish a more detailed budget breakdown to allow others to consider how we might cope in such circumstances.

March 27, 2014 at 4:22PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

3
Reply
Saied

Impressive! I love the look, mood and pacing, though I agree the story is a little lacking.

March 27, 2014 at 10:20AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Tom

Reasonable achievements and liked the costume and production design, but a good film in my opinion needs a script and actors. This film had neither unfortunately.

March 27, 2014 at 12:14PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Keith

This looks fantastic! If you told me is what shot on film with Lomo anamorphic lenses, I would've believed you. I love the retro look of all the props and costumes. Overall it reminded me of Soviet era science fiction, and Tarkovsky in particular. In that vein, some of the shakey handheld wide shots seemed out of place, but the camerawork was really effective at the climax. I would definitely pay money to see a feature version. Keep us posted.

March 27, 2014 at 12:23PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

8
Reply
Tim McC

Really nice work!!! I don't really care how much it cost you- I didn't pay, so why should I care? Anyone who looks at a film through the prism of budget is playing a fool's game.

I LOVED the design. The actors were great- especially the girl.

My only issue is the end. You set her up to be a little girl (a "girly" girl even). Yet at the climatic moment? She puts a bullet in the guys head. I didn't buy it. Rather, her opening up his helmet and watching him die was MUCH MORE believable for the character you created.

It also felt a bit long. But this says a lot about your filmmaking skill-- in a few shots you created a mood, feeling and texture that didn't need more. But because there was more, it felt slow.

FINALLY, watching MANY short films over the decades, I struggle to see anything but an extraordinary achievement that shows the ability of the creative team behind it.

You should also be applauded for putting it out. I'm a little worried that too many filmmakers keep their work hidden, (wrongly) believing that it's a "better" idea. No way. Show it!!

March 27, 2014 at 4:29PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Chriss

Thanks for all the info on your funding and media process. I just finished my film Space Trucker Bruce and although it had a very popular run in the local Juneau Alaska theater and plenty of local press, I'm struggling to get anyone to write articles about it online. Using Kickstarter as a publicity platform is a great idea. I self funded my project and did not do much publicity beyond a Facebook page until a month before release. I think if a filmmaker is going to try and publish their work online they need to start promoting early on.

also, I loved your film except the ambiguous ending. Nicely done! Especially the stabilized shots following the actor in the woods.

March 27, 2014 at 5:19PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

2
Reply

Hey Zeek (and anyone else who has advice),

I saw your first short last year, and remember reading about this one. It came out fantastically! I just completed my third short and i'm moving into features. Do you have any advice on Set/Prop design on a budget? And also, when it comes to VFX, any recommendations? And how did you assemble the team for your vfx? Thank you for your contribution to the film community, and being willing to share your experiences, godspeed!!

March 27, 2014 at 6:50PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

5
Reply
Markus Cook

Thanks Markus. The production design was a huge learning experience for us. We greatly underestimated the amount of time and energy it took to make everything. We made prospect happen was that our two production designers Nick van Strander and Matt Acosta took it on as a passion project. The best piece of advice I can give is, is find passionate people and then sell them on your idea. I did a lot of the VFX myself and we got connected with several Seattle locals that reached out during out kickstarter campaign that filled in the gaps.

March 27, 2014 at 8:49PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply

Zeek, thanks a lot and good luck with your work!!

March 28, 2014 at 1:09PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Markus Cook

@zeek. I actually read all of the comments before I watched your short and the voice of one person (bet you can't guess which one) had me thinking it was going to be mediocre at best. It's not...it's pretty damn good. Yes, it feels like it could be part of a full length film, but I still feel it stands on it's own as a short. I also disagree about the acting. It may not be Oscar calibre, but it is certainly more than serviceable and I think they were quite believable (and I'm an actor, so I would be the first to say if I didn't think so). I actually LIKED the fact that she was a girly girl who then had to rise to the occasion and perform a task she might not normally be capable of. It gave her a bit of a character arc...again, something that helped it stand on it's own as a short. Because I'm an actor, I look for character and story first and foremost...and I didn't find your short lacking in those areas. And of course the visuals are amazing. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion...I just wanted to voice mine. Very well done.

March 27, 2014 at 7:58PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
brd

If anyone's even still reading the comments by this point, I just want to thank everyone for making this such a big crazy discussion. As opposed to Vimeo, where 95% of the comments are completely positive, I would like to thank the No Film School community for taking the time to write so many thoughtful and critical replies. It's really helpful to hear what people didn't connect with or didn't like, particularly coming from film people. You guys are the best.

March 27, 2014 at 8:54PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply

I'm so happy this turned out so well. As an aspiring filmmaker, it always inspires me and reassures me that great things are possible with such passion. I've been following Prospect since the concept trailer, and I was thoroughly satisfied. And as filmmakers, you guys really know how to get things done, not just in the shooting aspect, but in throwing yourself out there and being connected to your audience. I had emailed you guys a couple times throughout production, and Zeek, you were good enough to answer my inquiries personally so that shows alot. I'm glad there are awesome filmmakers up here in the PNW. About the Gravity thing, honestly, I respect this film way more than I ever could Gravity. It was shot with pure passion and hard work, and beautifully photographed without being completely CGI. Just a lot of hard work and DIY rigging, and custom props. Its films like this, and some of my other favorites like Bellflower and Primer, that really give me the confidence to keep pursuing my first feature. Good job SHEP FILMS, you guys are fuckin awesome. I hope this isn't the last we see of you, and this definitely isn't the last you'll hear from me.

March 27, 2014 at 10:18PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Anthony

Great job on this film. Well done Zeek! To some of the haters here, we would love to see your work highlighted here on nofilmschool.com too. Why not celebrate those that are actually taking a risk, putting out their work and doing something with their talents. Anyone can point on what's wrong on a project, but how many people here can actually put out great work like Zeek? So he spent 28,000 on a short film, big deal... It just shows me that he has people that believe enough in his work to invest into it, and that is huge. It shows me that his team believes enough in what they are doing to invest into it too. But to the critics... who is willing to invest in your work? And what have you done? Can we see your work?

Once again, great job Zeek! Congratulations to all who worked on this! Be proud!

March 28, 2014 at 1:25AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
MV

The look of the film is amazing and it's interesting to hear about the process behind it BUT I was disappointed by the story - am I the only one?! We've seen this so many times before :( I just can't ignore the lack of a fresh and interesting story.

March 28, 2014 at 5:37AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

1
Reply
Steven

Excellent work guys! I found myself wishing this would get made into a full feature. Forget the trolls, you guys have a really decent story and world in your hands, and I believe any scifi fan would want to see these characters in this whole new universe on the big screen.

March 28, 2014 at 5:53AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

1
Reply
Ali

Such a beautifully shot film! Just a shame they forgot to tick the "Recover Highlights" button in Resolve. It is very clearly visible at 06:30...

March 28, 2014 at 8:05AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Birk

I just got two BMCC 2.5 cams for my work studio. Getting new MAC PRO TOWER soon to use with DAVINCI RESOLVE color correction. Will go after the BMCC 4.K next for my home studio. An article like this is perfect for what I'm already developing. Using the adaptor and inexpensive glass? Perfect. There's soooo much great, old manual glass out there. Have to make the time to create the work w/small crew and cast and pennies.

I've been screaming for the past few years: the digital rev. is made for indies...not insiders with big cash and HWD stars. This PROSPECT? PROVES THAT.

March 28, 2014 at 8:55AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
MARK GEORGEFF

Don't worry about the TROLLS here and throughout the INTERNET. They'll never create anything, just toss out their opinions and comments.

March 28, 2014 at 8:56AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

1
Reply
MARK GEORGEFF

What would be of the american cinema without guns and revenge?

March 28, 2014 at 9:27AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Manuele

Costume and props were really incredible. They helped set the mood enormously.

March 28, 2014 at 8:09PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Jose Antonio

I liked it, great athmosphere, great cinematography. Little bummed out by the end of the story and I didnt feel a very strong connection to the story or actors. But still a great watch!

March 29, 2014 at 4:09PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply

I know the BMCC doesn't support it (I have one) but I would have chosen a camera that had higher frame rates for slow motion. Real time movement in space scenes always looks cheap and artificial to me - slowing down even 50% would have helped create the mood. Seems a couple of days rental would have been possible given the funding. For me that would have had more effect on the feel of the movie than the anamorphics.

March 29, 2014 at 6:42PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

4
Reply
Steve

And I think the sound design could have added much more to the outside scenes. Why not add tension through sound and further convince us that it's not just shot down the road a bit in a park.

March 29, 2014 at 7:02PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Steve

Why are they wearing the space suits? If there is a forrest with insects (and probably animals too), there has to be an oxygen. BTW, the image lacks contrast and looks too flat in my opinion, but the scenery looks nice.

March 30, 2014 at 2:18PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Laurel

Very nice work! But why do the frame stills in the article looks so much richer (better) that the actual film?

March 30, 2014 at 10:29PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

3
Reply

Awesome forest.

April 4, 2014 at 10:40PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Daniel

Pages