July 27, 2014

This DaVinci Resolve Course, Now 75% Off, Will Get You Color Grading Like a Pro in No Time

Learn Color GradingThere are many factors that go into making a film look cinematic, like lighting, blocking, and camera settings, but creating a good color grade is certainly somewhere near the top. If you're completely new to color grading, but are looking for an opportunity to really get a firm grasp of it (or even if you just want to learn a few new techniques), this intensive DaVinci Resolve class, which will teach you everything from the basics of the interface to advanced color control, is now 75% off  ($49) on the online learning platform Udemy.

I can certainly attest to the frustration of having to piece together a messy and incomplete understanding of post software from a salmagundi of random YouTube tutorials. (I may know the 87 steps it takes to create a realistic-ish explosion in After Effects, but I wouldn't know the first thing about what any of the settings actually do.) This course's curriculum seems quite exhaustive, offering over 70 lectures on topics like general project settings and export and delivery, which is good news for those who have never touched color grading software before and want a thorough comprehension of DaVinci Resolve. And not only that, but the course also teaches basic theories on color and grading, so you'll know the why behind the what.

The course is taught by Dubai-based cinematographer Alex Jordan, who founded Learn Color Grading to teach young filmmakers and colorists how to color grade. Here's a bit about what the course is all about:

This course is designed with the absolute beginner in mind. No prior knowledge of Davinci Resolve or color grading is required. The course will guide you from basic subjects, like what is saturation and reading the scopes, all the way to advanced subjects such as selective tracking and keying. Along with monitoring tools and techniques.

Once you pay your $49 (the regular price of the course is $199), you get unlimited lifetime access to over 70 lectures which totals out to about 3.5 hours of content. The course is designed to make the process of learning DaVinci Resolve as simple, straightforward, and quick as possible. The requirements for the course state that you'll only need DaVinci Resolve Lite, which means that certain features available in the full version, like a host of stereoscopic 3D features, collaborative workflow options, and certain noise reduction and motion blur effects, won't be addressed in the lectures. The course is consistently being updated to the latest version of the software, so as new features are added, you'll be able to learn all about them.

Here's an intro video to the course:

And here are a couple of sample videos that show you what the course will be like:

If you're interested, head on over to the course page, peruse the lectures, watch the previews, and see if it's worth your hard-earned cash. (We're not sure how much longer you can get it for 75% off, so the sooner the better!)

Link: Easy Color Grading Course with DaVinci Resolve -- Udemy

Your Comment

32 Comments

Or as all the colorists I've talked to from Fotokem and CO3 say: just read the manual. It's pretty easy to understand from what I've read of it.

July 28, 2014 at 12:24AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Steve

Or watch Alexis Von Hurkman's excellent courses on Ripple Training. He's the guy that wrote the manual (literally), and it's exhaustive. I'm sure this guys course is great, and wish him the best, but I've been very happy with what I learned from the Ripple Training courses. It would really depend on how in-depth you needed to learn the program, as the Ripple Training courses are much longer (16 hours) but also about $70 more expensive (during this sale, at least).

July 28, 2014 at 1:19AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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I don't want to come accross as pissing on the headline but learning Resolve won't get you grading like a pro. Learning to colour grade will. If you care more for learning what makes a colourist and some of the theories of colour grading then a better resource is Mixinglight.com

July 28, 2014 at 4:33AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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I can't agree more with you Kraig. It doesn't matter what the grading tool is, a good colorist will always do a better job with the 3-wheels CC in his NLE than a beginner in Resolve... Also, grading is like shooting : a lot about practicing, with trial and error process to get better doing it. Definitely, MixingLight.com is the way to go.

July 28, 2014 at 5:49AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Seconded. Study paintings, fine art photography, art direction and costume design if you want to become a good colorist.
The techniques can be learned in a week. Some of the best resources for that are www.colorgradingcentral.com and mixinglight.com.

/out

July 28, 2014 at 8:42AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Jay

These teal and orange examples are worse than a Michael Bay movie.

July 28, 2014 at 5:45AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Jesper

Thanx Already enrolled

July 28, 2014 at 6:01AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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I bought this course around 2 weeks ago and I have to say I'm very happy with it. I really like that I have access to the videos whenever I want (without recurring fees), it covers Resolve plus coloring concepts, and it's straight to the point.

July 28, 2014 at 6:22AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Eric

Wow I learned something new even in those short 2 min vids, thanks!!!

and so true about the VFX, there are a ton of those tutorials but very few on color grading and sound mixing I find. 2 aspects that are vital!

July 28, 2014 at 10:29AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Kevin

I'm sorry but although it may be affordable and decent for beginner, anyone calling nodes "nods" consistently either doesnt understand the term or is mispronouncing it due to a language conflict, as Ive never seen it called anything but node in every software package Resolve, Smoke, Flame, etc. I HIGHLY recommend te slightly higher priced tutorials from MixingLight.com, RippleTraining from Alexis Hurkman,Tao of Color, and even Color Grading Central. You will learn a lot more and it will be more accurate and likely more knowledge for your money. No offense to this instructor, just doesn't seem qualified.

July 28, 2014 at 1:13PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Jason Bowdach

Yes, he has an accent. So what?
If the only bad thing about this course is the pronunciation of "nods", then I'm very happy with it.
Besides, all the other courses are membership-based. With this course I got all the info I need, plus I have lifetime access to ALL the videos for 49$. That's a steal!
I actually took the course and was very impressed. Before you judge his qualifications, take the course.

July 28, 2014 at 1:49PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Eric

Just to complete this absurd analogy; Stephen Hawking must not be a very knowledgeable guy since his pronunciation of some words is just not correct. By all means, his accent is horrible - doesn't seem qualified.

As Eric said, there are certain benefits to Udemy's access-structure. He might not be as experiences or knowledgeable as other people, but hey, it's a fair price for some people and they like the fact that it isn't membership-based (me included).

We can't all be native English speakers - actually, most people aren't. So let's all just look past some grammer or pronunciation errors and worry about the content of the message.

Anywas; thanks for pointing this deal out. I am looking to learn more about grading, and Resolve in particular - so this came in handy for me.

July 29, 2014 at 4:05AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Peter

Are you taking language courses? Everyone knows he meant nodes.

July 29, 2014 at 10:00AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Max

that is the most asinine thing i've seen in comments on this site. borderline prejudice. just because he was born in a different country from you and english isn't his first language he is inferior in his knowledge?! if you intended to be a jerk with that statement, congrats you won the prize on that one.

July 29, 2014 at 12:45PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Chris

Actually, I'm looking at paying the $50 but decided to scroll down the preview page to see what the lessons will entail. Then I saw the section on "Nods" and thought - wait, they are labeled "Nodes" in the software. Why is this misspelled consistently. Honestly, i came back here to the comments to make sure these lessons would be legit.

For me, when people mistake important spellings or terms in software, I can certainly forgive, but when I'm about to pay $50, it makes me less confident in their ability.

Make sense? Anyone take the course and like it?

August 1, 2014 at 8:56PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Matthew Battershell

Yea, I know what you mean. But I took the course and it's great. I learned so much from it. I can't believe i got it for that price.
I think i'll email him about the typos (teh instead of the, and nods instead of nodes, etc.). I can see how they can give the wrong impression. It's a shame because the course is really good.

August 2, 2014 at 10:25AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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David

The language conflict you're talking about is called " An Accent" which effects the sound of words and sentences only . I find it highly offensive to doubt the accuracy of a content based on how it sounds to your ear, after all it's not like he pronounces fork instead of knife, it's more like pronouncing kniffe instead of knife, Challenge yourself in life a little, connect the dots & save money in this case.
I don't know where you're from but pick any other place in the world ( English speaking or otherwise) and I bet your pronunciation sounds funny to their ear, should that stop the people from listening to you? don't fink so.

August 9, 2014 at 1:11AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Sepi

Your other traits though will.

August 9, 2014 at 1:24AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Sepi

I can't believe the comments of some spoiled brats in NofilmSchool lately. I bought this yesterday and I can tell it's an amazing catch for the price, a steal. I've only been through 35% of the videos and already got to improve the project I was working on. There's no ultimate way of learning whatever, you must always learn from different sources until you develop your own bag of tricks, and that is for everything. Anyway thanks for pointing this one out.

July 29, 2014 at 9:45AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Marcus

Does this course come with sample material to work with?

July 29, 2014 at 1:25PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Kyle

Go for Hurkman or Eagles. They are the proven pros.
Don't waste your money on this.

Buy cheap, buy twice.

July 29, 2014 at 2:20PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Fresno Bob

Wow. I have the EXACT OPPOSITE reaction. As a beginning user I've tried BOTH Hurkman's and Inofore's tutoriuals. YES both are masters in their field however their tutorials were, for me, extremely difficult to to follow and SLOOOOOW --Often leaving me with some confusion and more questions than were answered. So slow and SOOO complex I almost gave up.

THANK GOD I found Alex Jordan's lessons. I feel I have understood FAR more and in FAR less time. While yes.. I am a beginner but I can also tell by --how these sections were titled—(accurately) that it will be EASY to go back if I have questions and to find the exact thing I need to know when I get to be intermediate user -- i.e. EXCELLENT reference for the future. Versus other tutorials where I can only GUESS at what 15 min. section has that piece or topic I need a refresher on.

I can not recommend this series HIGH ENOUGH!!! And that comes from having experienced FIRST HAND, HAND’S ON the tutorials series of the other pros. Having said that – it will be great to have those other tutorials maybe for later on.. but seriously if you are new, or even intermediate DaVinci user, this is where you want to start.

June 23, 2015 at 9:20PM

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Marc W
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While some of his tricks with the software are helpful and educative, as a slightly advanced user I have a problem with his tutorials that I have with quite a few others as well: I personaly don't like his work and artistic quality. It might be completely subjective, which is in the nature of all questions of taste, but I'm constantly searching for masters of their field, who are acutually able to impress me with their results and enlighten my artistic view, rather than show me new tricks with the functions of a software or tool but on footage that I actually dislike.
The incredible blogs of roger deakins or (to a lesser extend) shane hurlbut are good examples of this in regard to cinematography and in the field of color grading Juan Melara (http://juanmelara.com.au/) comes to my mind. I would pay a lot of money for an actual online course from guys of that caliber....
If someone has a recommendation I'd be happy to hear it!

July 29, 2014 at 3:24PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Felix

Agreed. My issues is not his language or accent, it that he truly isnt very skilled at what he is teaching. Color grading is just as much art as it is as software skill, and it REALLY helps to be shown how a well trained artist works with color compared to someone who just knows how to use the software. It appears this instructor understands the software but his "art" of grading is not very good. Trust me, when working with a task as context sensitive as color grading, the better the person teaching you, the better you will learn both the art of grading and the software behind it. If you want to learn DaVinci's software, go read the manual or go to Vimeo or YouTube. If you are paying to learn, at least learn from someone that can help you do more than learn how to push buttons IMO. No offense to the Udemy course, but there is a reason Hurkman's Ripple training and Resolve fundamentals from Tao of Color are so well respected and its because they teach BOTH the art of grading and the software, as there are enough button pushing "colorists" out there.

July 29, 2014 at 8:45PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Jason

Obviously, you didn't take a look at the course. There is a whole section dedicated to the art of color grading (not the science). Art is subjective. Stop accusing people just because you don't personally "like" their work. This guy help demystify Davinci without me having to pay for subscriptions or watch a 13 hours video. No offense to their work. I just need something simple and easy to understand. And really?? reading the manual and searching YouTube? It simply doesn't work. Videos on YouTube assume that you got the basics covered.

July 30, 2014 at 8:10AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Eric

No need to be accusatory, I did look at the course prior to saying anything (hence why I brought up the misspelling of nodes....I never even mentioned an accent). To each's own: I personally do not feel you can even get the basics of the "art of color correction" in a section. There are reasons the other courses are longer, but I can understand why some want a quick course.

PS: the manual is actually one of the most useful pieces of documentation you can find on davinci, as it happens to be written by Alexis Van Hurkam, an actual colorist, not a typical software developer. Dont be so quick to throw away one of the best "provided" resource, along with YT and Vimeo, which has numerous useful tutorials on ALL of the basics. Prior to taking the "subscription" courses you refer to with such a negative connotation (where it can sometimes takes that long to discuss some of the features\technique, hence why there are sections and chapters), I learned the majority of Resolve using YT\Vimeo-hosted tutorials.

To be clear, your statements clearly states that you are more interested in learning the software than learning the actual art of "color grading". That can be learned in the short period of the class, but certainly not the mindsets and techniques of WHY you do something to an image. Just be sure not to get those confused, as they are NOT one in the same. Learning the software is the easy part.

No need to be so accusatory. I didnt say I didnt "like" his work, I stated it wasnt good training on the actual art of color grading. Why is he performing the operation in the first place, is that the best option for the image, which technique would be better suited for X\Y? Would this image benefit from a certain style or color scheme? These type of questions are questions that should be discussed when learning color grading, as these are the decisions a colorists needs to make hundreds a time a grade. Who cares why you are doing an "operation" to an image if you dont understand why.

I'll sum up: feel free to use this to learn Resolve, but I HIGHLY encourage further study of color grading if you want to learn the actual art of color. The Art of Color Correction from Hurkman is a fantastic book (for those not wanting video classes) as is ripple training. For more in-depth training, you can grade-along with a professional colorist and even get a consultation about how you are doing with the Tao of Color grade alongs. I have no affiliation to these programs\lessons aside from the fact that I've taken the courses and learned a ton from them. Good luck and happy coloring!

July 30, 2014 at 5:53PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Oh, you are the node vs nod guy! (if anyone is reading this comment check out the "nod" comment). I'm sorry, but after that "nod" comment, you lost all credibility.
And by the way, you have to learn how to operate a camera properly before using it to create art. you can't just watch a film and start creating art right away, you must learn the tool first. Plus the course cover a lot about the art and different styles of color grading. And who ever learns how to use a camera by reading the manual? Try reading the manual of an Ari Alexa. Same goes with Resolve.

July 31, 2014 at 5:57AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Eric

I'm sorry you feel that way, but Im not concerned with your opinion regarding my credibility. This will be my last comment as I can see my input is not welcome here despite my good intentions. The fact you blatantly discard the manual to a application (which is far different than reading a manual for a camera) explains enough about your willingness to learn. You seem to be far more combative than anyone else, but good luck with your studies regardless.

PS I never brought up cinematography, as that is an entirely different conversation, however, it is also an art that cannot be learned in a "short" udemy class. THat being said, if you dont read your manuals, you're simply doing yourself a disservice but thats your own decision. I'm sure you know the native ISO for every camera you've ever shot on.

July 31, 2014 at 1:29PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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I am halfway through the course and so far i'm impressed. Not everyone can teach. Being the best doesn't automatically mean you can explain things clearly. This guy knows how to simplify and clearly explain stuff.

July 29, 2014 at 4:12PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Chris

Well in all this discussion, and because of the arguments, I have learned of some new great sources for study! Thank you everyone! Personally I will find value in learning from all the above mentioned materials and don't mind paying for each one. A quick overview course seems to suit me as I begin and then move onto to more advanced teachings. Anyhow, I just bought this course - $50 seems like a super bargain!

August 1, 2014 at 11:14PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Watching it right now. It's really for beginners and he (so far) concentrates a lot on just colorgrading but it's pretty good. It's very used at Technicolor where I work so I'm learning it to stay on top...

November 27, 2014 at 9:07AM

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Vincent Galiano
Filmmaker / Screenwriter / Photographer
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UNBELIEVABLE! Why didn’t I discover this first?!

I am utterly astounded at the difference in Alex Jordan's ability to teach DaVinci vs. other tutorials. He makes it very intriguing in a blazing fast, easier to comprehend manner that removes so much of the mystery. I don’t know if it’s a case of A.D.D. but I can only describe the previous tutorial packages I’ve tried as a slog --where half way through my head is swirling with confusion and often asking more questions, than have been answered. Not to say the other tutorials were bad, not by any means, but they felt like a lesson in rocket science where as ‘DiVinci Resolve Simplified’ literally lives up to its title! As a fledgling user with a passion to learn I finally feel like I might now have a chance at becoming a REAL color grader. So much easier and faster to grasp the concepts. This is better than Christmas.

Thank you Alex!

June 23, 2015 at 9:04PM

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Marc W
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I can't seem to find the $50 version. Whenever I try, it shows $99. What'm I doing wrong?
Thanks.

March 20, 2016 at 7:42AM

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Hey people, lately i've been working a lot with color correction and grading, and im self taught for now but I would really love to do a full professional course, I can't seem to find anything. Does anyone know of any? I have no problem in travelling somewhere and staying for the duration of the course, cheers!

June 20, 2016 at 12:48PM, Edited June 20, 12:48PM

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Felipe Gera
Editor/Colorist
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