April 13, 2015
NAB 2015

DaVinci Resolve 12 Has Powerful New Editing Features, Fusion 8 Coming for Mac & Linux

Blackmagic today unveiled Davinci Resolve 12, and as you might have expected, the color correcting and non-linear editing features have been kicked up a notch. Plus there's a powerful new keyer that gives Resolve compositing abilities as well. Here's a video from the NFS team on the ground at NAB to show you more about what's new in Resolve 12.

Blackmagic also has some great videos on their Resolve page, but despite my best efforts I could not embed them (I tried, you guys). Anyhow, here's a quick rundown of the new features in Resolve 12.

Resolve 12 Editing Interface

New Editing Tools

  • Slick New Interface that's Cleaner, Easier on the Eyes
  • Multicam Editing with a Host of Sync Options
  • Improved Trimming including Advanced Simultaneous Multi-Track Trimming
  • Nesting Timelines for Working on Large Projects with Multiple Complex Timelines
  • On-Screen Controls for Manipulating and Animating Motion paths of Graphics
  • Highly Customizable Transitions Using Curves Editor with Bezier Handles
  • Real Time Audio Mixing by Recording Fader Moves
  • VST and Audio Unit Plugins for Full Control of Audio
  • Export to Avid Pro Tools for Professional Audio Mix
  • Improved Media Management and Bins

New Color Correction Tools

  • Enhanced 3D Tracker¬†
  • Brand New 3D Keyer for Color Correction and Compositing

Honestly, Resolve's non-linear editing capabilities are now up there with many of the established NLEs right now. Outside of the cloud-based collaboration features that you can find with Adobe and Avid, there's not much that you couldn't accomplish as an editor on a Resolve system that you could do on any other NLE. Not only that, but Resolve is still among the most powerful and intuitive color correction tools out there. And at a price of $0 (if you opt for the lite version), it's safe to say that professional editing doesn't have to cost a dime anymore (especially after Avid's announcement yesterday).

Blackmagic also announced today that the upgraded version of Fusion (their node-based compositing software) will officially become available for the Mac and Linux operating systems sometime during the third quarter of 2015. We've already talked extensively about the significance of Fusion before, but we'll be covering the new features in version 8 in an upcoming post.


No Film School's complete coverage of NAB 2015 is brought to you by Color Grading Central, Shutterstock, Blackmagic Design, and Bigstock.

No Film School's coverage of NAB is brought to you by Color Grading Central, Shutterstock, Blackmagic Design, and Bigstock

Your Comment

24 Comments

Great but the download links are to the old version, how can I get 12?

April 13, 2015 at 6:37PM

5
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According to the BMD website: Coming Soon!

April 14, 2015 at 10:21AM

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Taylor Russ
Director of Photography
668

Is this going to be a free update for existing users again, like Resolve 11 was?

April 13, 2015 at 6:38PM

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Christopher Kou
Production Manager
199

It will be a free upgrade, and the release of 12 will be in July.

April 13, 2015 at 7:19PM

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Nathan
Cinematographer
88

When can I download 12?

April 13, 2015 at 7:31PM

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Caleb Rasak
Camera Operator / AC
388

July.

April 13, 2015 at 8:57PM

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Nathan
Cinematographer
88

I think this is Adobe's biggest competition right now. MC First needs to match Resolve lite's abilities to have a chance, I fear Avid crippled it far too harshly.

April 13, 2015 at 8:26PM

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David Sharp
Video Editor, Cinematographer, Teacher
299

Guess you're dismissing final cut pro?

April 13, 2015 at 8:44PM

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Charles C.
Editor/ Director/ Director of Photography/ Wannabe Thinker
1003

The mass dismissal of Final Cut X is less an indictment of the software and more an uneasiness in placing faith in Apple again. They burned a lot of trust by releasing FCPX like they did, completely stripped down and severely lacking in features professionals needed. It was iMovie Pro.

They've improved it significantly since, but everyone moved onto Adobe or back to Avid. It's going to take a long time before people are going to trust Apple enough not to just dismiss the pro community like that again.

April 13, 2015 at 9:04PM, Edited April 13, 9:04PM

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Joshua Bowen
Editor
525

This.

When my livelihood is at stake, there's just no way I'm going to invest in a workflow that may dramatically change (or stop being supported) without notice.

I have no faith that Apple are going to stay in the game for the long haul. I have no faith that Apple place their professional users at the heart of what they do. But I do have that faith with Adobe and BM.

April 14, 2015 at 7:20AM

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Agreed and I'll add that even if FCPX had never been released and Final Cut had remained more consistent, I still would have switched simply due to the fact that FCP was and will likely always be tied to Apple hardware. This isn't a price issue or even a quality issue for me, but one of flexibility in both my own workflow and in being more able to work with a client's workflow. The terrible product that was FCPX only quickened my switch.

April 14, 2015 at 1:51PM

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Bruce Ingram
Editor and Colorist
166

You've hit the nail on the head. The 'dismissal' of Final Cut X is less to do with the software's capability and everything to do with the attitude of Apple towards professionals.

April 14, 2015 at 12:05PM

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Kayode
895

Im editing on Final Cut X right now. So " Everyone " has not moved to Adobe or Avid. Cheers.

April 14, 2015 at 1:21PM

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Claire McHardy
Cinematographer
331

Not trying to dismiss FCPX at all, I'll never be able to get my point across if I have to mention every NLE out there either ;) it just more speculation about the future of Editing and who seems to be getting most of the chatter these days. Most of the social circles I run in all the talk is about Adobe and BM. These 2 seem to be evolving their software the fastest for their communities. I think BM is being very smart about aggressively making their software available to the next generation of editors. Which is how FCP, and Pespi were able to get so popular back in the day.

How you choose to work is the most important determining factor on what software you pick these days. They are all functional, they will all get the job done. Forcing people to work a certain way just because is a bureaucracy.

April 14, 2015 at 12:10PM

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David Sharp
Video Editor, Cinematographer, Teacher
299

The feature set is getting close, but I've tried using the editor in Resolve 11 before, and it's way too clunky to compete with Premiere. In general, the interface is slow and inflexible, there are tonnes of timeline tools missing (sans the very basics), and we've had multiple sync issues when importing XMLs.

Although, I'm interested to see how they've improved 12, because it's still better than all free editors I've used (when discussing the lite version).

April 14, 2015 at 1:13AM

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Clay ton
Director/Cinematographer/Editor
88

Sorry, for some reason I can't edit comments on here?

I just double checked Resolve, and it does actually seem to have most of the same tools available, but I still feel as if the implementation is too clunky to use in place of Premiere, or even come remotely close to competing with Avid.

April 14, 2015 at 1:42AM

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Clay ton
Director/Cinematographer/Editor
88

My biggest problem with Resolve is that I can't run it on machine that doesn't have a dedicated GPU. Premiere Pro and FCPX run fine on these machines.

April 14, 2015 at 1:47AM

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Mike Tesh
Pro Video / Indie Filmmaker
498

Yup, I found it incredibly slow. I had someone from BM telling me to upgrade my hardware then he/she went silent when I mentioned After Effects, Premiere Pro and Speedgrade all ran nicely, even when all opened at the same time.

April 14, 2015 at 12:07PM

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Kayode
895

Resolve is very GPU intensive. You need something bigger than a typical 512MB graphics card. They're quite rare these days but, I just put an EVGA GTX680 2GB in my aging 2008 Mac Pro and it can handle Arri raw files (3424x2202) pretty well now. Not as zippy as HD but, I don't get the "Your GPU memory is full" message anymore and I seem to be able to add as many nodes as I feel is necessary.

I'm not an expert but, if you have a later model Mac, look into the GTX700 series.

Wondering now if Resolve 12 will run on Mountain Lion.

April 15, 2015 at 10:10AM

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Richard Krall
richardkrall.com
1167

Again, same as last year, this makes me want to permanently switch to Resolve for main editting. They make it look soo easy. However, last update it turned out to be not quite there yet. I hope this update will enable me to just stay inside resolve.

April 14, 2015 at 3:59AM

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Jeroen Rommelaars
Animator - Videographer - Motion Tracking
698

Wow! VST Support is awesome. I am from an audio backround, so I can do all my sound design and mixing inside Resolve? Thats mighty.

April 14, 2015 at 7:30AM

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Anyone know if 12 will run on Mountain Lion?

April 14, 2015 at 10:47AM

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Richard Krall
richardkrall.com
1167

Wow this might save me a lot of time. No more round tripping to Premiere maybe?

April 14, 2015 at 11:48AM, Edited April 14, 11:48AM

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Clayton Arnall
Camera Pointer
165

Premiere just never seemed to handle my Mac Pro trash can--crashes a lot, etc. And I know it's hardly using my GPU at all so I'd love to switch but... Resolve 11 didn't come out until August of last year. Will we really have to wait that long again?

April 24, 2015 at 8:38AM

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J Robbins
368

Hi, please, anyone: do you know how can I get a slow motion out of 60fps in Davinci Resolve 12? In FCPX there is this "automatic speed". Is there anything alike in Davinci? Thank you so much!

July 31, 2015 at 10:10PM

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Thiago Pereira
Editor
81