October 31, 2016

Final Cut Pro X Gets Full Redesign for 10.3

While many users have moved over to Avid and Premiere, Final Cut keeps on developing.

Alongside the release of the new MacBook Pro last week, Apple also unveiled Final Cut Pro 10.3.  While there are a few key software details that are clearly intended to work seamlessly with new features on the MBP, this release is much more than that. It offers a complete redesign of the user interface, powerful new audio organization tools, the integration of wide gamut workflows, and many more features that will likely make some filmmakers reconsider an app many left behind.

FCP-X 10.3 Touchbar IntegrationCredit: Apple

Of course, the feature demonstrated on stage last week is the first many noticed, with strong integration between the touch bar and the newest version of Final Cut being one of the ways Apple promoted the new keyboard interface screen. With the ability to zoom and navigate your timeline, dynamically change your palettes, and otherwise interact more closely with your footage, Apple is clearly hoping you'll consider giving FCP X a shot with the purchase of your MBP. However, Adobe was also on stage, previewing new features for Photoshop, so we can assume Premiere will have smart integration, and Resolve is apparently already working on putting the Touchbar to good use, as well. Therefore, while the touchscreen integration is exciting, it alone isn't necessarily enough to get users who walked away from Final Cut after 7 to consider coming back.

Rec. 709 vs. 2020Credit: Apple
We're going to be hearing more and more about "wide gamut" workflows for a while, as we finally leave behind Rec. 709—the HD color gamut originally designed for CRTs back in the 90s—and into Rec. 2020, designed for UHD, flat panel LCDs and other modern technologies. A bigger gamut allows for more colors to be reproduced accurately in a system, and the combination release of FCP X, which allows for switching between 709 and 2020, and the new Macbook Pro, which has a 2020 capable screen, is another area where the hardware and software combination development that Apple is so famous for will benefit users. Of course, until the systems are widely out in the field we won't know how accurate the wide gamut workflows are, but seeing this feature should be exciting for all filmmakers regardless of when the last time you personally used Final Cut is. Rec. 709 is the past, 2020 is the future, and more systems need to integrate it.

Apple is pushing for pro users with this update.Credit: Apple

One interesting set of upgrades is an increased variety of options for second screen workflows. Considering the focus of Apple on single screen interfaces (to better facilitate iMac and Macbook Pro work), FCP X has often felt frustrating for multi-screen editors in a way that Premiere and Avid haven't. Even Resolve hasn't always used the extra screen real estate well and can seem like it was really meant to be a single screen application. However, this revision allows for full screen timeline and browser modes when working dual screen, which, in combination with the customizeable palettes, should make for better use of large screen real estate.

FCP-X layoutCredit: Apple

An interesting area of improvement is the new "magnetic timeline 2," with improved "role" functionality for audio clips. FCP X was built from the ground up around a dynamic, magnetic timeline that changes depending on how it's being used. This is a paradigm shift for many editors and has slowed many people from adopting, or even trying, the software. With 10.3, the magnetic timeline has been improved and might be more familiar to traditional editors, and you'll also get the added ability to group your audio into "lanes," which will allow you to have some of the benefits of tracks while still offering the dynamic responsiveness that FCP X is designed for. By assigning audio a role, either on import or even before ingest through iXML, the audio clip will know whether it's an effect, dialogue, music, etc. When doing pre-mixes or exporting stems, it'll be easier to group the audio together by selecting only elements that follow a specific role, instead of having to double check your entire timeline to make sure you arranged the audio properly and no clips are in the wrong track.

Credit: Apple

This seems like a lot of improvements for a release that doesn't change a full revision number, but there is a major perk to this being a 10.3 as opposed to Version 11. This is a free upgrade for all existing users of FCP X, going way back to its release in 2011. Releasing an upgrade this thorough five years after purchase is a great way to support the filmmakers that have dived in to FCP X.

But the question remains: is this enough for you to feel like Apple still cares about filmmakers?

Available now at Apple.com for $299, with a free 30-day trial available.

Tech Specs:

  • New UI
  • Customizable workspaces with memory
  • Rec. 2020 workflow option, with out of gamut range check
  • Color code and batch assign roles
  • Full screen timeline and browser options on 2nd monitor
  • 64-bit architecture uses beyond 4GB of RAM
  • Automatic Touchbar integration
  • LUTs automatically applied to footage, including Log
  • PCIe and Thunderbolt devices for external video monitoring

Your Comment

71 Comments

This brilliantly cut video shows the new features from Final Cut Pro 10.3 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mRbJH-GDumg

October 31, 2016 at 1:18PM

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Jonny Lewis
Self shooting editor
118

Started to watch video and quickly decided it was a waste of time. Far to choppy to analyze what the new changes really mean.

October 31, 2016 at 4:54PM

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Robert W.
182

If you want in depth watch this https://www.hazu.io/pixelcorps/fcvug-8 - jump to 3:20 for the start

October 31, 2016 at 7:49PM

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Jonny Lewis
Self shooting editor
118

Also check out Ripple Training https://www.youtube.com/user/rippleguy/videos

October 31, 2016 at 7:50PM

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Jonny Lewis
Self shooting editor
118

Cool. So... its DaVinci Resolve now.

October 31, 2016 at 1:30PM

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doman nelson
Director, Editor
213

No, because Resolve works in tracks. X still involves no patching and organizes everything via metadata. Remember, Resolve borrowed the trim tool and the inspector from X so there were already similarities.

October 31, 2016 at 1:39PM

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Brad Jones
Director/Producer/Writer/Editor
257

If anything Resolve and Premiere have taken a lot of cues from FCP x over the last 5 years it just goes unnoticed. FCP x is a very solid and underrated NLE now.

October 31, 2016 at 1:46PM

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Charles C.
Editor/ Director/ Director of Photography/ Wannabe Thinker
998

Whole-heartedly agree. Been working FCPX for years and it keeps getting better. It also has a lot of utility that I would be sorely missing if I moved over to any other NLE.

October 31, 2016 at 3:02PM

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Daniel King
Videographer, Editor
262

The point is that it is not NLE. It is linear editing software.

October 31, 2016 at 6:49PM

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Marek Kremer
Editor & Colorist
107

Uh, it's actually the most non linear option out there https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=yzcnXFhTC1k&ebc=ANyPxKrbBtwNKZuT4nA079CpnS...

October 31, 2016 at 9:39PM

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Brad Jones
Director/Producer/Writer/Editor
257

I think you've probably never worked on a tape-based system if you think FCPX is linear...

October 31, 2016 at 10:48PM

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Noah Leon
Videographer editor
255

You keep using this word "linear". I don't think it means what you think it means.

If anything FCPX has the LESS linear timeline of ANY current "NLE".

October 31, 2016 at 11:15PM

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True

November 1, 2016 at 12:38PM

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Jan Becker
DP, Director, Producer
104

This is a great update that allows you to organize your media by metadata instead of patching tracks. It really is another revolutionary feature for an already revolutionary NLE. Here's the full list of updates.

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201237

October 31, 2016 at 1:36PM

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Brad Jones
Director/Producer/Writer/Editor
257

The one thing that it is really missing and ignorant that they did not add it was Video Lanes as well. Seeing how this option works with audio would be a no brainer to have the same option for video. With that feature, it would get us close to track editing capability so you could marry the two. This would also be a win-win because they would win both markets with that. Fix it Apple...

October 31, 2016 at 3:54PM

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Mustafa Johnson
Director/Videographer/Editor
95

Video Roles would not work in the same context. While the vertical role order for audio makes no difference in how it the sound plays back, forcing a Video Role order would very much impede the flexibility of compositing order of various elements like titles, overlays, effects, etc.. I questioned this at first, but it's a non issue.

October 31, 2016 at 5:00PM

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Insert obligatory "lol imovie pro/nobody uses FCPX/it's not professional/etc. etc." comment.

Now that that's out of the way, I absolutely love this new update. The new audio organization tools are fantastic and unlike anything I've ever seen. Love it!

October 31, 2016 at 4:15PM

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The elephant in the room for me has always been that you can't divide up the interface across mutiple screens, causing me and many others to flood to Prems..
Has anything changed? Sure you can customize but can you divide?

October 31, 2016 at 4:57PM

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It has more options that it did before - you can choose different layouts across multi-display set ups. They're not all independent windows, though. Honestly, I don't really care because the options it gives me are more than sufficient.

October 31, 2016 at 5:35PM

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Daniel King
Videographer, Editor
262

You can now punt either the Event Browser, Viewer, or Timeline Window to a second screen. The Timeline window is the real winner here, as the extra vertical space is great when in expanded Component view. Additionally, you can now hide the Timeline Window entirely, if you're focused on logging.

November 1, 2016 at 1:26PM

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I'm confused by your comment... I've been using FCPX for quite a while and I always work with a 2 screen layout. I have my timeline, browser and EFX on one screen and my viewer and CC on the other. There are other ways to do it with the older version and even more with this new version.

November 1, 2016 at 6:10PM

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Toll
Producer/ Director of Photography
111

With Final Cut Pro X, Apple has develop a new editing paradigm that is really the future of editing. Fast, simple and really efficient.
I very rarely say things like this but: everybody else does it wrong.

Once you witnessed how efficient FCPX is, it is impossible to go back to archaic times of a rigid timeline. I really don't get why there are still so many users who are afraid to jump ship for the best.

October 31, 2016 at 4:57PM

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ron fya
28

You've obviously never used Vegas Pro. FCP X from the beginning and in this update basically took many features and concepts from iMovie and Vegas and created FCPx. And everybody else is not doing it wrong. Vegas is now with Magix and it's timeline, as old in design is it is, still is superior for one-person shops to any other NLE. It has tracks but audio tracks can move around anywhere, be grouped, nested but yet still has more powerful DAW tools that Premiere, Resolve and Avid combined. It's weaknesses are metadate and multiple sequences but the new company Magix is moving forward and I expect to see those and more added.

I've used all the major NLE apps (Lightstorm I've only tested never cut a project) and none of them are perfect. FCP-X is for Mac only users that don't work in groups, don't post professionally (I make DCPs and FCP-X projects are a nightmare to get, always have bugs in visual and audio output). If you are making web videos, it's a fine tool. But people who need more have jumped shipped.

I have hard data too. My DCP business deals with low-budget filmmakers. 5 years ago, FCP7 dominated - 80% of projects were cut on it. Today more projects are STILL cut on FCP7 than FCPx. It's about 60% PPro, 10% Avid, 10% FCP7, 5% Vegas & FCPx and 15% other.

October 31, 2016 at 9:56PM

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Stephen A van Vuuren
Filmmaker
131

That's interesting. I've put out atleast 50-60 televised ads out of FCP X in the last 4 months never once felt I needed the program to do more. Guess I'm "professionalling" wrong

October 31, 2016 at 10:42PM

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Charles C.
Editor/ Director/ Director of Photography/ Wannabe Thinker
998

Stephen was mostly referring to Theatrical releases, hence the DCP stats.

November 2, 2016 at 6:38PM, Edited November 2, 6:38PM

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Spence Nicholson
Writer / Director / Producer
94

No they don't have Rec.2020 capable screens. There won't be any in the near future.

October 31, 2016 at 5:25PM

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Driftwood
307

Actually the new MacBook Pro and the 5k IMac are P3 displays so they do show rec 2020 as does the new monitor they develop with LG.

October 31, 2016 at 9:49PM

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Brad Jones
Director/Producer/Writer/Editor
257

P3 color space is more than Rec709, but less than Rec2020: http://www.avsforum.com/forum/imagehosting/17662543dab6fdc0b7.jpg

November 1, 2016 at 12:26PM

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Jared White
Writer/Director
74

The P3 monitors display something like 80% of the Rec 2020 color space to my understanding. The software knows this though as I have a 5k IMac which I can switch to Rec 2020 in FCPX and I have a 2015 Macbook Pro which I cannot view Rec 2020 in FCPX. So there is a difference in the display options for wide color gamut. P3 is the minimum to view HDR content.

November 2, 2016 at 1:49PM

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Brad Jones
Director/Producer/Writer/Editor
257

FCPX was written with a mistaken impression of what an editor does. Firstly, the magnetic timeline. A unnecessary piece of eye candy. For professional editors audio and video are separate animals. The mistaken idea that sync needs to always be maintained is erroneous. Editors create their own sync. Audio and video content is very often captured and ingested by different devices and at different times. How out of sync audio and video is useful information but a profession editor handles that. Many times I purposely throw sync off to either cheat or compress the content. Tracks are also a good tool. Media is created by camera or sound recorders on tracks. Mapped keyboards in Avid and Premiere maintain the workflow for final delivery. FCPX deliverables seem to be just iPhones and MacBooks. It's always easier to create simple mixes for simple playback devices. However we're still using TV's and showing films in theaters. Professional editors have to be able to create for all that.
Secondly, media management and collaborative workflow. A few years ago meta data was the rage in media software. Though metadata has it's uses most editors just want to get their work done. Wasting times organizing and tracking meta data for minor rewards is time consuming. Media's most useful metadata is the date it was shot, who shot it and what was shot. Beyond that you're going into the realm of the annoying. Then you have the issue of where the media is and what form it is in. Avid has solved that very well over the last few years. There is no automatic transcoding in the background to a drive somewhere where the "Event" resides. The media belongs on the media drive and if that drive gets full more media is put on another drive. Where the project or 'Event" are is secondary and separate. The media and the edits don't have to be together. Each sequence isn't a event it's just one stage of a project. In Avid these are all shareable and pasted around or are on the server that multiple editors use. Premiere also does this.
I know that some of what I've written about is possible in FCPX but it requires using FCPX in an alternative way, not the way Apple wants it to be used.
Some random thoughts Apple should consider. Final Cut Pro 7 was a good program. FCPX isn't. Apple needs to accept that keep the very few things right with FCPX and correct the mountains of useless workflows or just plain dump it.

October 31, 2016 at 5:42PM

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Whoa boy, you know nothing Jon Snow. Where to begin with this.

First off, FCPX was developed by a guy named Randy Ubillos. He invented the original premiere pro, the original final cut pro, Aperture and the later incarnation of IMovie. IMovie was originally developed as a logging tool for FCP7. Randy had figured out that the media management in the original FCP could be improved with an external program but Steve Jobs made this software into the new IMovie. So to say that the people behind X knew nothing about professional editors is ludicrous and uninformed. Clearly the guy who invented every major NLE out there except for Avid most likely learned a few things when developing software and reading through feedback from thousands of editors over the years to improve his own software.

In regards to your gripe with the magnetic timeline, most timelines you have to put into ripple mode to not leave gaps. X took the opposite approach and by default is in ripple mode and you have to tell it to leave gaps in the timeline. This honestly works better for a lot of editors including myself as in FCP7 and Premiere I was always ripple trimming and deleting so there wouldn't be gaps in my story unless I wanted them to be there. In regards to the sync, I would say 95% of the time, we want things to stay in sync. We don't want them to go out of sync unless we tell them to (which you can do as well in X). Things like "clip collisions" which are just annoying are a thing of the past in X.

In regards to the complaint about the metadata, first off if this is such a bad thing why has both Premiere and Resolve tried to implement their own versions of meta data organization via smart folders? Clearly they thought it was a pretty fucking good idea too because it is. However, no other NLE has implemented this as well as X. I can make smart collections that I can take to each bin (event) that will sort footage automatically for me. Gosh, that sounds efficient. Well we can't have any of that nonsense. You bring metadata from set via IXML and organize and name all your audio channels on import (stop it, you're making my job hard). Actually, there is all kinds of metadata that is important and generated metadata is part of that. If I need to know where my multicam clips are I can sort these instantly with in a matter of seconds with a smart collection. I no longer need to make string outs because the subclipping is so efficient it renders that process kind of moot. I can also reject parts of clips that I will never use and I never want to see again such as the crew waiting for a plane to fly overhead but the camera was already rolling, etc. You're dead wrong about metadata and that is proven by the fact that all these NLE's are copying that feature from X.

The transcoding in X is not automatic, you have to tell X to transcode to optimized or proxy media and you can decide where you store this media in the library settings.

In regards to your complaint about turnovers, X is the easiest for broadcast turnovers because of roles. If you have assigned your roles correctly (which you can do on import) setting up your multitrack turnover files takes a matter of seconds in X and you can save that preset to be used again later if you are doing this on a regular basis. So your textless, split track files are done with very little work compared to constantly having to patch the right assets (music, sound fx, etc) to the right track for final delivery.

Next time you post a rant about X it might help that you learn to use the software first because you just look like you don't know what you are talking about. Sorry to be so blunt but I have learned one thing over the last five years; the most vocal group of people against this NLE have no idea how to use it because if they did they wouldn't be so loud.

October 31, 2016 at 10:30PM

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Brad Jones
Director/Producer/Writer/Editor
257

Couldn't agree more, and thanks for the history lesson, Brad. Well said.

October 31, 2016 at 10:42PM

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Noah Leon
Videographer editor
255

If you threw your audio off on purpose at our prod house you'd have hell to pay. Never heard that audio being in sync was an annoyance. Thats news to me haha. Also Final Cut Pro 7 was a good program. FCPx is a great one.

October 31, 2016 at 11:17PM

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Charles C.
Editor/ Director/ Director of Photography/ Wannabe Thinker
998

> FCPX was written with a mistaken impression of what an editor does. Firstly, the magnetic timeline. A unnecessary piece of eye candy. For professional editors audio and video are separate animals. The mistaken idea that sync needs to always be maintained is erroneous.

I call BS.

October 31, 2016 at 11:18PM

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Lastly FCPx's current user base is higher than FCP 7 at its height just figured I'd put that out there

October 31, 2016 at 11:18PM, Edited October 31, 11:59PM

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Charles C.
Editor/ Director/ Director of Photography/ Wannabe Thinker
998

I was two paragraphs into a raging takedown of this nonsense, but Brad Jones beat me to it in style, so I'll abstain – except to say; Chris Mara, WHAT THE HELL ARE YOU TALKING ABOUT?!

You want your Audio out of sync? then disconnect it from the video clip like in any other NLE!

FCPX deliverables "seem" to be just iPhones and MacBooks? If a 4K ProRes 4444XQ file isn't enough for you, then export an xml and bring it into Resolve – again, like you would with any other NLE!

The first thing you do when creating a new library in FCPX is deciding whether to keep imported files in place, or bring them into the library – having centrally stored and shared media in Final Cut is just as easy an any other NLE!

Every single thing you're saying is just totally uninformed. How can you have such strong opinions on a program you've clearly only opened once on an iMac at the local Apple store?

October 31, 2016 at 11:58PM

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Why did Apple resigned from calling it iMovie? It was such a good name.
;)

October 31, 2016 at 6:56PM

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Marek Kremer
Editor & Colorist
107

Is that your you in the picture, or your son? Because the comment really feels like it was made by a 12 year old.

October 31, 2016 at 11:20PM, Edited October 31, 11:20PM

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Woooaaahhhh clever! -_-

October 31, 2016 at 11:23PM

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Charles C.
Editor/ Director/ Director of Photography/ Wannabe Thinker
998

The extraordinary ignorance of so-called pros pooing FCP X and pontificating that it has "useless workflows" is stunning. The fact of the matter is FCP X's workflows work quite well for many open minded pros who happily go about creating great content despite the naysayers. I shake my head in amazement that this nonsense is still spouted. The vitriol is so disappointing.

October 31, 2016 at 7:32PM, Edited October 31, 7:58PM

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Carl Olson
Podcaster, Content Producer
136

My disappointment is with Apple. They were close to taking over the NLE market with a decent product in FCP7 and they threw it away. The NLE industry is developed. It worked. It wasn't broken. There are many aspects to it that are part of the viewing experience. A example is the transition from 35/70mm projectors to DCP projectors. Instead of re-inventing the entire experience they took the best of theater viewing and created what we have today. The DCP projectors use Xenon bulbs just like before. It's 24fps but instead of running film in front of the bulb there's a transparent chip that changes it's image 24 times per second. This maintained the viewing experience. Apple is in a unique situation that would allow them to leverage their hardware with the software. FCPX is very fast because of this. However they were seeing a problem that professional editors were not seeing. Producer/editors were though. Because the industry was restructuring many jobs that used to be done by multiple people were now being done by one person. Projects were being handed off to people to produce and direct entire shows. Many people were having trouble with accomplishing soo much. Along comes Apple with FCPX. It'll simplified the workflow. However it had to cut a lot of corners to accomplish that. Corners that professional media creators weren't really happy with. In the end it has a niche market. Too bad...

October 31, 2016 at 8:20PM

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What corners did they have to cut in order to have a fast and efficient workflow? Have you used FCP X 10.3 and identified these cut corners?

October 31, 2016 at 9:55PM

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Carl Olson
Podcaster, Content Producer
136

Though the release in 2011 was a complete failure on Apples part. In the 5 years since they have taken a decent product and made it a great one. FCP x is a great editing experience.

October 31, 2016 at 10:46PM, Edited October 31, 10:47PM

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Charles C.
Editor/ Director/ Director of Photography/ Wannabe Thinker
998

I agree. They kind of shot themselves in the foot by missing a few key things like multi cam, and since then they've corrected those issues and made something really great. I kind of wish they had called this update Final Cut Pro 11 so that more people would give it another chance.

November 1, 2016 at 8:27AM

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Beau Wright
Filmmaker
374

I'm an editor since 1999. I edited with AVID, Premiere, Media 100 and SphereOUS (I know few people know it and I think it doesn't exist anymore). FCPX was just the more promising software I ever used. With this release it just became the best software I know. I already edited 5 long documentaries with it and many little things and I loved using this piece. Apple (I'm not an unconditional apple fan, I don't like their politics sometimes, for example the last Macbook Pro) put some real improvements to FCPX many wanted. Just this once, Apple listen to his customers and did a great editing software. Can't wait to use it.

October 31, 2016 at 8:08PM, Edited October 31, 8:08PM

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Frederic Monpierre
Filmmaker / Editor
119

I love all of these changes, even the UI changes have really grown on me. The lanes with the color coated roles is a thing of beauty and now that I have used for a few days I'm wondering how I survived without it for so long. Glad they are listening to us. I was a little worried after 10.2 as there were some nice features but 3D text seemed like it should have been implemented much later. Great update!

October 31, 2016 at 10:34PM

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Brad Jones
Director/Producer/Writer/Editor
257

FCPX is pro software, and if you want to see it continue and not die, I would really ask that people stop being so negative about it, and get behind the developers who have, in this iteration, finally completed (in my opinion) an editing system which is so fast at getting through huge amounts of footage from shoot to delivery, that it boggles my mind that I could have ever considered anything else. I began with FCP 5, 6 and 7, switched to Premiere CS6 for a while (which is a great piece of software, don't misunderstand me) and then as pressures mounted to get projects done faster and faster, but still the same or better quality, I found I was driven to Final Cut X, I didn't do it on purpose, it was simply the only tool that would allow me to cut six to eight hours of footage into an hour-long programme, and export it with all effects, titles and grading in 45 minutes, on a Macbook, on a train/plane/Starbucks. There is simply nothing like it. Once you establish a workflow in FCPX, it is simply impossible to go back.

October 31, 2016 at 10:47PM

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Noah Leon
Videographer editor
255

> But the question remains: is this enough for you to feel like Apple still cares about filmmakers?

You keep hammering this BS over an over in the article. FCPX the first version had some features cut not because Apple didn't "care", but because they cared so much that they rewrote the app from scratch, to get rid of legacy code and better position the codebase for future updates. They could also have redone an implementation of the same tried and tired editing timeline, but they tried to invent a new one.

Since then, they have added most, if not all, of the missing features back, and improved into lots of areas, with .1, .2. and now .3 (e.g. added great multicam editing).

And while a lot of people, especially change averse people, jumped to the familiar FCP 7 workflow of Premiere, a lot of use stick with FCPX, including lots of editors for major features. And it's one of the best selling apps on the App Store, which means millions of sales.

So, there's that.

October 31, 2016 at 11:13PM

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Haters are gonna hate and most hate stems from ignorance.

October 31, 2016 at 11:17PM

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Brad Jones
Director/Producer/Writer/Editor
257

Funny. This reads like 2012 all over again.

This 10.3 update is really good. I miss the 3D look but I'll probably get over that.
It now has some new features that are very useful.
It runs much faster thatn 10.3 in fact I had been planning on getting a new computer to replace my 2008 Mac because FCPX was sluggish sometimes but now I don't need a new computer with this update because it's positively snappy.

November 1, 2016 at 2:42AM

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Still won't run on a PC which means you have to buy one of their crummy, non-expandable computers. The REAL production world uses PC's. Apple is in it for the money and nothing else.

November 1, 2016 at 5:47AM

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Jerry Roe
Indie filmmaker
581

"The REAL production world" says the indie filmmaker...

November 1, 2016 at 6:19AM

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November 22, 2016 at 5:39AM

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Jerry Roe
Indie filmmaker
581

yup. Moviemaker does it all.

November 1, 2016 at 8:28AM

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Kristian Appel
Director of photography
81

We have 12 Macs at our productions house...We put out at least 350 ads in 8 months from them...at least half of those out of FCPx...just saying you might be off there a little

November 1, 2016 at 12:15PM

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Charles C.
Editor/ Director/ Director of Photography/ Wannabe Thinker
998

I think how v10.3 looks like should have been the update in 2011 already. Especially the "new" audio lanes. Don't get me wrong - I am using FCPX from the beginning and was convinced by the new approach and I was always hoping for the improvements Apple made so far, but all the "new" features with the 10.3 update everybody is celebrating are not so new in the world of editing apps.

November 1, 2016 at 6:46AM

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"While many users have moved over to Avid and Premiere, Final Cut keeps on developing."
Jeeez what a headline...
FCP X is my goto workhorse. Its so stable, fast and easy to work with. Avid, Premiere and Resolve are way behind when it comes to core editing.

November 1, 2016 at 8:20AM

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Kristian Appel
Director of photography
81

What I can see from this upgrade of 10.3, is that we don't get 4k Ultra HD image output. Considering the wider colour gamut additions and being able to handle 4k footage. In addition, no improvement to colour correction tools and no Cimema DNG sequence imports. The three features I wanted most.

November 1, 2016 at 9:15AM

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*Rides in on his grey steed, 18 hands tall, clad in white and grey cloth, holding up what look like a mac book pro in one hand and a computer tower in the other, but you can't be sure*

He bellows 'Friends, Fellow Humans, Film-makers and creatives, do not argue about why it is good and both bad, my father once told me something wise beyond his years, and still beyond mine'

*Dismounts horse and shakes random hands whilst pointing and winking at other NFS users*

This quote was "Different strokes, for different folks" What his means is, each to their own!

November 1, 2016 at 9:22AM, Edited November 1, 9:22AM

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Every tool has it's role and is useful to certain people and workflows. Many people love FCX and many people love Adobe CC. "Better" is a matter of personal choice and experience. As a Mac user for over 20 years, I really love the OS but I can't help but take notice of the direction of the company as of late and its priorities. I've simply grown to trust Apple less and less over the years to provide the tools I personally desire. I also have a distrust that they will continue support for certain tools based on their past. FCPX is really nice and but it's not enough to keep me on the Apple platform. I've just recently switched from Mac to PC and will be using Adobe CC not because it's better, but simply because it's more of what I personally desire in a creative tool. If FCPX was availabel on PC, I'd definately consider using it from time to time but I'd most likely use CC as my main editor.

November 1, 2016 at 9:55AM

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Dantly Wyatt
Musical Comedy & Content Creator.
557

First off, let me say I'm not on here to bash FCP X. Tools are tools, and if the tool works for you, and you turn out professional work, guess what? It's a professional tool.

But I do have a serious question for regular FCP X users.

My history is I started on linear systems, learned Avid as early as 94, was full-time on Avid from 96 until about 2001. I switched fully to FCP by 2004. And with all the keyboard customization options, I had gotten my editing process blazing fast by the time of FCP 7, which is still my favorite editor. Now, I primarily use Premiere and Avid, but I find both a little limiting, though in different ways.

My question is this: how keyboard-intensive can you make the FCP X experience? I tried the software for a day or two last year, but didn't find a compelling reason to stick with it. To me, my best editing scenario is one driven almost exclusively by the keyboard. The less I touch the mouse, the better.

November 1, 2016 at 11:21AM, Edited November 1, 11:20AM

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Wayne Franklin
Writer/Director/Editor, ACD
86

Keyboard shortcuts are plentiful just like any other NLE.

November 1, 2016 at 12:22PM

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Charles C.
Editor/ Director/ Director of Photography/ Wannabe Thinker
998

You can, quite literally, map ANY function to any unused keyboard combo. You can also re-map any existing one to your liking. You can even save these keyboard shortcut setups and switch between them for multiple users. Like the shortcuts in AVID or CC? You can download setups people have shared to accomplish that. On Google search "FCPX command editor".

November 1, 2016 at 1:02PM

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Kyle Farris
Owner / Director of Photography / Colorist
1

You can absolutely customize FCP X's keyboard shortcuts as much as you like. In the most recent update, they added shortcuts to select clips above/below the currently selected clip (Command-up/down) and to let the Trim Start/Trim End (aka Top/Tail) commands work on multiple clips at once. Much improved. This article should give you a few advanced examples: https://www.macprovideo.com/hub/final-cut/final-cut-pro-x-the-best-advan... and here's the official list of defaults: https://support.apple.com/kb/ph12724?locale=en_AU

November 1, 2016 at 2:13PM

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That’s a great question! My podcasting pal Chris Fenwick is a master of using a keyboard for FCP X. We talk about it a bit in the latest Digital Convergence Podcast.

November 2, 2016 at 11:39AM

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Carl Olson
Podcaster, Content Producer
136

FCP X is now a brilliant piece of software and I love using it, especially since it works so well on Macs (even older ones).
On the other hand I do 80% of my work on Premiere.
I think it's important to stay fluent on both although I'm not even an editor.

November 1, 2016 at 12:37PM

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Jan Becker
DP, Director, Producer
104

I'm liking the look of the new update for FCPX, but my biggest problem, which is arguable, where are the pro machines to back this up? Apple aren't innovating the same way Windows based machines are regarding the creative market and Premiere Pro still looks the most attractive.

November 2, 2016 at 5:34AM

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I really love the new update, the ability to shuffle roles has pretty much fixed all the issues I have had with other NLE.

Plus with the organization tools implemented in this update I will not have to spend hours putting things into folders that are pretty much labeled the same.

Apple really has outdone themselves and the whole industry with this one update. They are simple fixes, but for the most part so progressive in making a faster and more accurate workflow than any other on the market.

November 2, 2016 at 2:48PM

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Kyle Dockum
Videographer and Editor
399

I've been cutting a commercial on FCPX and it will take a lot more than these updates to make it worth while to consider switching. I feel that they only thought of half of the issues when creating the magnetic timeline. Sure setting roles might be great for grouping things for export but the whole magnetic timeline creates such a huge disorganized mess when editing that it becomes a hindrance to the creative flow more than being "invisible" like they claim it to be.

November 3, 2016 at 5:21PM, Edited November 3, 5:21PM

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Jared Isham
Writer/Director/Editor
81

I used Final Cut Pro X on two recent projects, and I liked it. I do like the magnetic timeline.

However, the sticking point for me is the hardware. The Mac is overpriced and not very expandable. If you've ever priced out a Mac Pro, you probably learned that the same specs in a PC cost a fraction of the money.

Of course, the downside of the PC is the Windows OS, which does occasionally have buggy updates.

Alas, there is no perfect balance.

November 3, 2016 at 7:01PM, Edited November 3, 7:01PM

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Glenn Bossik
Videographer
456

Indeed, I feel like I would love the concept but I cannot stand the retarded MacOS and hardware limitations, therefore I'll have to stick with Premiere..

November 3, 2016 at 9:23PM

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zetty
Filmmaker
771