March 11, 2017

2 iPad Apps That Will Make Post-Production 1000 Times Easier for You

If you're using your iPad primarily for binging on Netflix and YouTube videos, you're not using it to its greatest creative potential.

iPads have made a lot of people's lives easierand not just by giving them a larger screen on which to watch movies and play Candy Crush. There are plenty of apps out there that help filmmakers complete their work faster and with greater control, and if you don't know what these apps are, then today is your lucky day. The team over at Film Riot have named a couple that can not only help you more quickly accomplish certain tedious tasks in post, like masking, but also help you gain more control when fine-tuning certain areas in your timeline.

I've had an iPad for a while, but I have yet to really look into its potential as a cinematic tool. However, the two apps host Ryan Connolly mentions in the video certainly provide a strong case for using an iPad on film projects for those, like me, who haven't thought to do so yet.

Astropad

The first app Connolly talks about is Astropad, which is a $30 app that allows you to mirror your Mac workspace with your iPad so you can take advantage of its touchscreen feature. Essentially, once you sync your iPad to your Mac, you can use it like a Wacom tablet to do a number of different things in post, like create masks, a zillion times faster. All you really need is a stylus to get going.

CTRL+Console

CTRL+Console turns your iPad into a touchscreen console for Adobe Premiere, Final Cut Pro, and other post-production programs. With it your iPad becomes a powerful extension of your workspace, one that gives you a tactile experience sans mouse. You can add gesture controls, choose which consoles you want, and not have to worry about lag. It's free to download, but in order to get the console you want (Premiere, Final Cut, etc.), you'll have to fork over $30 for the editor and $5 for the controller.

Have you ever used Astropad or CTRL+Console? Do you think they're worth the money? What are some iPad apps that you think filmmakers should check out? Let us know in the comments below.      

Your Comment

14 Comments

I don't understand this at all. It will never be as quick as knowing your keyboard shortcuts and having some practice with them. You can't map a full keyboards worth of controls to a touchscreen, and at that point it's just another keyboard. This will only slow you down, no matter which way you look at it.

March 11, 2017 at 10:18PM

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Joshua Bowen
Editor
649

Have you used it to give a proper assessment? It is a tool like any other tool. When NLE's came on board the guys from tape editing days weren't very happy about all this digitisation and gave it hell... FFWD, who's using tape anymore for editing? I'd say, give it a run before you chastise it. I've used it and I Edit Commercials, Music Videos, Films and just working with it is pretty nice and slick.

March 13, 2017 at 11:31PM

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Wentworth Kelly
Director/DP/Colorist/Drone Op
2105

I'd argue that "tactile" and "touchscreen" are mutually exclusive...

The idea is good in principle, but the whole point of having a tactile console is that you don't need eyes on it. This is not the case with a touch screen as you have no tactile frame of reference.

March 12, 2017 at 1:17AM, Edited March 12, 1:17AM

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Hendrikus De Vaan
Producer - Director
272

Yeah weird. What he's doing with that wheel seems pointless if you're using J,K,L and ctrl V or whatever your preference is. The thought of glancing to one side to touch an iPad seems like an added hurdle.

March 12, 2017 at 7:24AM, Edited March 12, 7:24AM

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Liam Martin
DP, editor, part time director
608

Astropad looks similar to Duet Display, which is what I use. If I recall correctly, it was only $10. Super handy for hotel room editing and logging. Only problem is that it doesn't work as well with Premiere as it does FCPX. Perhaps Astropad is better.
As for CTRL+, While I agree that a pro should have keyboard shortcuts down, many people that are new to editing don't. I'm happy to see that companies are easing the point of entry. I prefer the tactile feedback of a real console, but day-to-day, I see no problem with just a keyboard.

March 12, 2017 at 9:31AM

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I can see how the use of a tablet beside your computer could be helpful with drawing masks in AE or pinning tracks on Mocha, quickselection is photoshop etc. I'd love to see a windows/android alternative though.

March 12, 2017 at 6:33PM

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Jeroen Rommelaars
Owner of Cropped Media Videoproductions Amersfoort, The Netherlands
656

I use a Wacom tablet to mask in Mocha. I bought that after serious RSI related problems. It turned out to be a pleasant way of working, healthy too.

March 13, 2017 at 2:27AM

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Interesting. I mainly thought this was a good idea because a tablet shows you the underlying video while working, but maybe thats not necessary and a wacom as you say could do the trick as well. Never really learned how to decently work with those, though, but I may just need to dive into those tablets again.

March 13, 2017 at 5:54AM

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Jeroen Rommelaars
Owner of Cropped Media Videoproductions Amersfoort, The Netherlands
656

I also have a WACOM Cintiq that I use for PS and will switch to in a pinch for more precision when drawing more detailed masks in AE or PPro. A mouse has NOTHING on a stylus when it comes to precision.

Like others said, back in the linear days using shuttle wheels and buttons worked well because it was a physical console sitting there with dials, wheels, & sliders. You knew what you were touching by feel. A screen doesn't offer anything truly tactile. A screen just feels like a screen. You have to look down to see what you're doing which sort of eliminates the whole point of efficiency. Unless, you're working directly on the screen(Ipad or Surface are far too small)....something I look forward to in the future. I'd like to edit by touch right on my 34" Dell Ultrawide=)

March 13, 2017 at 11:23AM, Edited March 13, 11:23AM

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Josh.R
Motion Designer/Predator
862

Never will I ever take my hand off of the keyboard to play or pause the content while I am editing.

What would be useful would be an app that can do something a keyboard can't: use the unique touch/pressure interface

If I could click on a curves adjustment, clip, or color wheel and then reach over to a touch surface and use that interface to control something that would be an incredible step forward (i.e. when I touch the ipad the brightness or shadows move up or down as I move my finger up or down w/ the intensity referencing the distance from my init touch, or a color wheel shows up where I touched and the direction I move away from the init point controls saturation while the angle affects hue, one finger could be color for shadows, two for gamma, three for highlights etc.)

It is cool this kind of stuff is getting traction because we're closer to these things being integrated in a useful way.

March 12, 2017 at 8:37PM

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Drew
18

Clickbait article title.

March 13, 2017 at 12:39PM, Edited March 13, 12:39PM

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Adam J. Richman
Cinematographer
28

I use the Remote control for premiere and it is pretty decent... left hand on iPad and right hand on mouse... I love it! its practical.. maybe not to a few but you can find it useful.

March 13, 2017 at 7:36PM

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Wentworth Kelly
Director/DP/Colorist/Drone Op
2105

Thanks for the support Wentworth!

March 13, 2017 at 9:32PM

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Jeff Chow
Founder, CEO, Chief Creative
15

I use Astropad extensively when editing photos, because you can mask, shade and select with great accuracy. It's my poor man's Cintiq, but it's bloody brilliant. I haven't used it for video editing yet because I don't need to do masking or any fine-grained control, so keyboard shortcuts are sufficient.

(As an aside, I did get Pro Cut X after reading about it on NFS. It's dreadful)

March 16, 2017 at 2:32PM

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Dan Horne
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