May 18, 2017

See the Entire ‘A Clockwork Orange,’ ‘The Shining’ and More as Single Long-Exposure Images

Inferno-Jason-Shulman
British artist Jason Shulman uses ultra-long exposures to turn every frame of your favorite films into a single image.

What would you learn about your favorite movie if you could see the entire thing as one picture? How is that even possible? Sculptor Jason Shulman has already done the work for you, developing a process to record each and every one of a film’s 130,000 frames (typical of a 90-minute feature) and merge them into a piece of art.   

How did he do it? According to American Photo, “Using a high-resolution computer monitor, Shulman began playing out the entire length of various films, training his camera’s lens on the screen and leaving its shutter open for the entire duration of the movie.”

“Hitchcock is all about character, whereas Kubrick was preoccupied with structure.”

The resulting images of classics like Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey and The Wizard of Oz reveal what Shulman calls the “genetic code” of each film—and insights into their directors, too. Shulman told Wired that “Blurred human figures emerge in the Hitchcock films, whereas what stands out in the photographs of the Kubrick [film]s is symmetry, or some kind of formal composition.” He continued, “I don’t know if you can really draw conclusions from this, but to me it says that Hitchcock is all about character, whereas Kubrick was preoccupied with structure.”

Aside from being a visual treat, the images become an object lesson in cinematic tone, texture and palette, giving us a new way to analyze some of the all-time most beloved and successful films. If you happen to be in London, you’re in luck: new large-scale versions of the images are showing at the Photo London festival until May 21 and at London’s Cob Gallery through June 4. The rest of us can get a little taste below:

A Clockwork Orange

Stanley Kubrick, 1971

Credit: Jason Shulman

Close Encounters of the Third Kind

Steven Spielberg, 1977

Credit: Jason Shulman

Rear Window

Alfred Hitchcock, 1954

Credit: Jason Shulman

The Shining

Stanley Kubrick, 1980

Credit: Jason Shulman

The Silence of the Lambs

Jonathan Demme, 1991

Credit: Jason Shulman

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre

Tobe Hooper, 1974

Credit: Jason Shulman

Featured image of 'Inferno' (1980) by Jason Shulman

Your Comment

7 Comments

Close Encounters reminds me of Turner's paintings. I love those paintings :-)

May 19, 2017 at 12:22PM

0
Reply
avatar
WalterBrokx
Director, DOP, Writer, Editor, Producer
8743

May 19, 2017 at 1:40PM, Edited May 19, 1:40PM

3
Reply

I'm having these printed on canvas

May 19, 2017 at 6:59PM

0
Reply
avatar
Thomas Bunink
Student
102

I would think much more value could be obtained by presenting each film as a series of long exposures. One for each scene.
Another alternative: One exposure for each of the three acts of the film (assuming a three act structure, of course).

May 20, 2017 at 2:32AM, Edited May 20, 2:32AM

5
Reply
Matthew Stephens
storyboards
305

Go for it! We'll publish the results. ;)

May 21, 2017 at 12:42AM

0
Reply
avatar
Liz Nord
Editor-in-Chief & Lead Producer
Documentary Filmmaker/Multi-platform Producer

Is there any site that provides a more detailed look at his methodology? That American Photo article doesn't reveal much. Neither does his website. In any case, it seems this was merely an art project. I'm skeptical of any data that could be obtained regarding directorial style and intent from single images like these. The Eye of the Beholder sees all, I suppose.

May 21, 2017 at 6:01AM

0
Reply
Matthew Stephens
storyboards
305

May 20, 2017 at 6:30PM, Edited May 20, 6:30PM

0
Reply

Blue and orange.

May 21, 2017 at 5:11PM

1
Reply