» Posts Tagged ‘audience’

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Jon Reiss no film school interviewUnless you are the 0.0005 percent of filmmakers who got picked out of the line-up of would-be Hollywood auteurs, you should stop thinking of ‘entrepreneur’ as a dirty word, and start thinking about how to find your audience yourself. That’s what producer/director Jon Reiss suggests, and he’s carved a living in independent film since, well, before the Internet. In the No Film School video interview below, Jon Reiss talks about anything from a filmmaker’s goals dictating a release strategy, to making music videos with Danzig and Trent Reznor, to the interactive theatrical experiences of his latest indie sequel Bomb It 2. More »

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doctor who twitter trending future of storytellingI recently wrote about new technologies that might be reinventing the form of cinema. However, all these groovy tools focused on one aspect of media: how the individual receives content into their brain (like, in the future, directly.) What about the missing element of cinema that many nofilmschoolers have cited as the best part of the fading theatrical experience: being part of an audience? Two nerds of the highest caliber, Kevin Slavin of the MIT Media Lab, and Kenyatta Cheese of Know Your Meme, have an interesting viewpoint on how looking up hashtags about the Doctor’s TARDIS may actually point you to the real cutting edge technologies of storytelling. (I knew it!) More »

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Insider Access at ChillThe Chill distribution platform has been on the rise since the beginning of this year and the company is continuing to improve and evolve their platform. One of these evolutions is Insider Access, a new feature designed to help filmmakers create an exclusive destination for their audience to follow along with a production before the release of a film. It’s where all your exclusive content can go, including anything you want to publish direct to boost audience interaction and growth. Get the scoop on Chill’s latest after the jump. More »

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Seed and Spark Emily BestWe are back to play hardball with Emily Best, Founder of Seed&Spark, a new crowdfunding and digital distribution platform that claims to be part of “the future of filmmaking.” Yesterday we explored the genesis of the website and its differences with other crowdfunding giants. Today, the conversation gets more interesting. More »

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Being an independent filmmaker usually requires one to wear a lot of different hats — not only during the production process — but also in the arenas of promotion and marketing. It’s hard work to build your audience from the ground up, and NoFilmSchool has covered this topic in multiple posts that will hopefully make this process somewhat easier and more understandable. But while we have explored audience building on YouTube quite a bit, we haven’t really gone into using social networking sites as much. However, in his recent webinar Richard Harrington talked to Scott Bourne — one of the most followed photographers on Twitter and Editor of PhotoFocus.com — about the best methods to use for audience building on Twitter. More »

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Depending on how much time you spend on or around YouTube, you may already be aware of the site’s original channels venture – which is not to be confused with its partnering program, a far easier monetization leap to make for the everyday user with a high-traffic upload. Interchangeably called ‘YouTube original’ or ‘premium’ channels (but not like cable TV premium channels — they mean quality of content, not ticket price), the venture was announced about a year ago and launched just this past January. Unfortunately, the returns so far have been pretty lackluster. Now, YouTube is certainly not giving up on what seems to have been an overall rough turnout —  they are, however, seriously cutting back numbers on partner renewals. More »

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As many of us here consider ourselves DIY filmmakers, the thought of packaging our scripts with talent may not cross our minds frequently. Yet, even for the most independent project, we need an audience. As writers, we need to write for our audience. By this, I don’t mean we should pander to the audience or write what the audience expects. Rather, as we craft our stories on the page, we need to keep our readers engaged. Those readers include producers, casting agents, and talent, as a recent WGAw educational panel reiterated for aspiring writers. More »

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How do you build an online community? Building an audience for your work is one thing, but building an entire online community around a single idea, not just your work (like NoFilmSchool — DIY), might take months, or more likely, it will take years. Philip Bloom, who has been a huge part of the online filmmaking community, sits down with Vimeo’s Blake Whitman and motion designer Nick Campbell to discuss how to grow and maintain an audience for your work. The video is obviously a bit long since it was a panel at the recent Vimeo Festival, but even if you only have a mild interest in the conversation, there are great tidbits that extend into just being a filmmaker in the 21st century. More »

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This is a guest post by Brian Newman.

Freddie Wong (FreddieW). Ryan Higa (NigaHiga). Jenna Marbles. Kevin Wu (KevJumba). These are four names that I can mention in conversation with almost everyone I know in the independent film business and get blank stares. They aren’t the only four names that I could mention, but to me, they are arguably the four most important names that every indie should know about, but somehow no one does (hyperbole, I know). More »

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10,000,000+ views. 33 viral videos on YouTube’s front page. 50,000+ subscribers gained.

In the last three years, my company has driven millions of people to our videos and our clients’ videos, and turned many of those people into advocates for the material they see. We’ve done it through social networking, sharing, generating traditional PR, postings and links from blogs and websites, audience development and good old fashioned advertising.

Along the way, I’ve learned a few things about what YouTubers like (and don’t like!). I’m applying what I’ve learned to promoting my new film, Drinking Games (premiering in LA on June 4th), and I thought other indie filmmakers who self-distribute — or need to compliment their distributor’s lackluster marketing efforts — might benefit from reading about my experiences past, present and, eventually, future.

So, here goes: More »

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YouTube has released a 70-page Creator Playbook aimed at helping video creators build their audiences online. This is exactly the kind of thing that would come in handy for actors looking to build their own career, in addition to filmmakers. The digital download, which YouTube says will be updated regularly, looks to be an excellent resource on building an audience (not just with YouTube, but by using Facebook and Twitter as well). Here’s the release: More »

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Last week I wrote about bestselling author Seth Godin’s switch to self-publishing and what it could mean for filmmakers. Scott Macaulay at Filmmaker Magazine linked to the post in his invaluable Instapaper Sunday Morning Links, along with a pro-publisher argument written cogently at TechCrunch by author Paul Carr (whose book Bringing Nothing to the Party: True Confessions of a New Media Whore has been in my queue for a while). The slug of Carr’s post — “Self Publish and Be Damned” — makes his views pretty clear, but upon further reflection I think both Carr and I are oversimplifying the argument and missing out on a viable distribution strategy for the published and unpublished alike. More »