» Posts Tagged ‘color’

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DaVinci ResolveIn the process of narrative filmmaking, a talented cinematographer can achieve the desired aesthetic through closely controlling the characteristics of light, color, and composition. In these cases, color correction shouldn’t really be needed (although a creative grade can certainly take the image to another level). In documentary filmmaking, however, where many of the images are captured sporadically as the action unfolds (which can very easily lead to mismatched footage), the process of creating a unified aesthetic is usually left to the colorist. Luckily, John Ryan Seaman of GranolaTech has some excellent tips for grading your documentary-style footage that should help get you up to speed on the core concepts and techniques for color correction. More »

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davinci-resolveRED has held back for quite some time letting other manufacturers use 3rd-party hardware acceleration in their software with RED’s proprietary .R3D codec, but that time has now passed. In the new 10.1.3 update for Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve, GPU acceleration is now supported with RED files, which will mean faster workflows for anyone not already using a ROCKET or ROCKET-X card from RED. More »

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Seedgrade CCColor grading is one of those practices where an in-depth knowledge of your software is absolutely essential to get the job done right. While DaVinci Resolve is quickly becoming the gold standard for grading applications, Adobe users have an extremely powerful alternative in Speedgrade CC, which now has the ability to roundtrip with Premiere much in the same way that other Adobe programs do. One of our readers, Dave Andrade, sent me an excellent tutorial that walks us through the entire process of grading inside of Speedgrade, from small exposure adjustments to output and everything in between. More »

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DaVinci resolveWe got our first look at DaVinci Resolve 10 at NAB 2013, and at that moment it was clear that Resolve was taking aim at NLEs with the new “Edit” tab in the application. However, until version 10 was officially released, it was unclear just how the editing features of the program would function, and more importantly, whether or not they would allow Resolve to become a one-stop post production solution. In that first iteration, the editing features were solid, but not enough to unseat any NLEs. However, in version 10.1, Blackmagic has added a few new sophisticated editing features, as well as other enhancements. Read on to see what’s new. More »

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Premiere Black and WhiteBlack and white seems to be going through a resurgence of sorts. In the past year, a plethora of well-received black and white features have hit theaters, from Frances Ha to Nebraska, the cinematography of which we’ve talked about extensively. While there are multitudes of methods for capturing black and white images in camera, more often than not, modern films are shot in color and then converted to black and white in post processing. Unfortunately, many younger filmmakers think that the only way to accomplish this is through complete desaturation and maybe a boost in contrast. However, the infinite possibilities of our modern color tools open up a world of possibilities when it comes to black and white. Stick with us, and learn how to take creative control of your black and white inside of Premiere Pro. More »

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SpeedgradeLast month, Adobe released a major update for their creative video applications, which added, among other new features, the long-requested ability for a direct link between Premiere Pro and SpeedGrade. Before this update, there wasn’t much reason to choose SpeedGrade over other grading applications such as DaVinci Resolve. However, now that the direct link between the two programs is in place, editors and colorists have plenty of incentive to learn SpeedGrade and incorporate it into their workflow. With that said, here’s everything you need to know to get started with Adobe SpeedGrade. More »

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Resolve 10Last week, Blackmagic Design released version 10 of its world-renowned grading application, DaVinci Resolve. Beyond some of the more obvious enhancements that will benefit independent filmmakers, most notably the fact that the free version of Resolve now supports 4K content, the folks at Blackmagic have introduced some really astounding and innovative new features that are sure to make a difference in your color grading workflow. SpliceNPost, a New York post production house, has put together a comprehensive video overview of the best new features in Resolve 10. Check it out: More »

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Filmmaker IQ Digital ColorColor is one of the most important and powerful visual tools through which filmmakers can convey ideas and emotion. Choices in the color palette begin with the production designer and the art department, continue through the work of the cinematographer, and end with the colorist. Through gaining an in-depth and holistic understanding of the process through which color is embedded in the films that we watch, we can begin to make the same informed color choices in our own films. Even though learning the ins and outs of color can be a life-long process, it doesn’t have to be intimidating. John Hess of Filmmaker IQ has put together yet another excellent lesson, this time explaining the intricacies of color in the digital age. More »

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Hawaiki ColorApple threw us a major league curveball when they introduced FCPX a couple of summers ago. Not only did they re-conceptualize the notion of the timeline, they also completely changed the way we apply color changes to our footage. Although the new interface offers an interesting new take on color correction, for many people it doesn’t beat the simplicity of traditional color wheels. Luckily, plugin creator Hawaiki has introduced their new Color plugin which restores traditional color correction functionality to FCPX in a sleek and easy to use interface. More »

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A Trip to the Moon_colorWe see it every day, everywhere we go. We use it to make sense of our world. We use it in our art, to mark errors, and to know when it’s time to go at a stoplight — color. Adding color to films was one of the first major developments of cinema before the advent of sound, digital, and 3D, and John P. Hess from Filmmaker IQ gives us a video lesson on not only the history of color in filmmaking, but also the science behind it — from Isaac Newton’s experiments with optics to today’s digital color manipulation. Check out the video after the jump. More »

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itu r rec 709 2020 hdtv 4k uhd ultra high definition 2As some have speculated, the recent push for 4K/UHD may have as much to do with hype as it does with quality. And, as has been stated time and time again: you may not get a huge benefit from 4K in your home, depending on viewing distance and screen size. There are some other factors, however, that make ‘Ultra HD’ technology desirable, regardless of clarity so crisp you can’t even tell how crisp it really is. These factors are the other important goals defined in the ITU-R’s (aptly dubbed) Rec. 2020 spec for 4K/UHD. Namely, they are (larger) color space and (progressive-only) frame rate. More »

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Ed Lachman on Craft TruckCinematographer Ed Lachman has had a storied career working with some of cinema’s finest directors, the likes of which include Robert Altman, Steven Soderbergh, Sofia Coppola, and Todd Haynes. Craft Truck sits down with Ed to discuss his background in German expressionism, his approach to storytelling and his philosophy behind his use of color in his films. Hit the jump for the excellent two-part interview: More »

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Tommy Edison Blind Film CriticHave you ever wondered what it would be like to be blind? Many of us couldn’t fathom life without the use of our eyes, and as filmmakers, visual information is everything. Or is it? The self-described ‘Blind Film Critic’ Tommy Edison has an excellent catalog of videos from his YouTube channels that really have me thinking. Here Tommy answers questions about color, dreaming, attractiveness, and he even reviews movies! Hit the jump to get a glimpse into Tommy’s life. More »

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waveform monitor histogram after effects adobeDepending on the acquisition system, waveform monitors and vectorscopes can guide quality control of your imagery from shooting all the way down the pipeline to grading, mastering, and compression for delivery. Scopes can seem a little intimidating and esoteric to the new user, but getting the basics down can really help in owning your image. Recently, Alexis Van Hurkman over at ProVideo Coalition has answered some key questions about scopes: find out which ones he considers the most indispensable below, plus when it may be a good idea to trust your own pair of eyes in making adjustments — even when your scopes are reading ‘A-Okay.’ More »

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Sin CityWe’ve been talking quite a bit about Adobe over the past few months, as they’ve announced new versions of all their major desktop applications and ended the Creative Suite as we know it. Even though some folks are none too thrilled with Adobe right now due to the complete switch to the Creative Cloud, they still make what many consider to be the rising star of NLEs with Premiere Pro, and it’s more packed than ever with features to make filmmaker’s lives easier. Today we’re going to explore two of the lesser known color effects that come with Premiere Pro, the Leave Color and Change to Color effects. While these might not be something you will use day-to-day, they’re an excellent option when you need to create some highly stylized shots at a moment’s notice. So without any further ado, here are the tutorials, straight from Creative COW: More »

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Color spaces and color models can be difficult to wrap your head around completely. There are additive and subtractive spaces, like RGB vs. CMYK, and different format/display technologies, like analog’s YUV vs. digital’s YCbCr — all of which you may have to traverse to achieve the final ‘look’ you want for your imagery. Not to mention that many color spaces are not absolute, meaning they don’t profile device-specific color representation. This can certainly induce a bit of a headache for newcomers to the color science realm. A great post by photographer Mark Meyer, featured recently on PetaPixel, explains how you can quite literally better-orient yourself to color spaces and models by, well, modeling them — in 3D open suite Blender, no less. More »

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The most common way we get color images with digital cameras is with a Bayer pattern CMOS sensor, but there are plenty of variations on that design being used today. The upcoming Aaton Penelope Delta uses a Bayer pattern over a Dalsa CCD, for example, while the RED EPIC-M Monochrome uses the MX CMOS sensor foregoing color filtration entirely. By their very nature, though, color filters of any kind cut down the amount of light transmitted to the sensor. That’s why Panasonic is developing a brand new type of color filter that will employ diffraction to split up the color spectrum, instead of filtration, and thus will be capable of doubling the light sensitivity of the sensor. More »

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This is a guest post by Tristan Kneschke.

With the release of Apple Color several years ago, the once-niche field of high-end color grading trickled down to the average user. When Blackmagic released DaVinci Resolve on Mac it became more obvious that color grading was the next big wave. Having already been grading professionally with Color shortly after it was released, I quickly decided to invest in a traveling DaVinci Resolve Mac Pro tower. The client demand for color grading in particular, and a traveling station specifically, has grown my business at a rate I never thought possible. Now, with Resolve 9 nearing its official, non-beta release, Blackmagic has separated itself even more from Apple’s killed product. More »

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Many argue the legitimacy of games when it comes to learning, but games can certainly exercise the mind if they challenge you to think and problem-solve. I’ve never really seen a game of any kind that could possibly help me become a better filmmaker — that is, until now. If you’re brand new to color correction, or even any sort of graphic art where color is involved, there is now a game called Color that will help you improve your skills. More »

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Gamma & Density make high-end tools for DIT (Digital Imaging Technicians) such as their complex 3cP data management system. However, as more and more productions go digital, it seems to me there will be a need for a more budget-friendly DIT solution. Utilizing the iPad seems like a perfect way to allow cinematographers and directors to communicate their aesthetic intentions on-set. However, G&D’s $400 pricing seems a bit high for the indie crowd; anyone know of any alternatives? Here’s the promo video: More »