» Posts Tagged ‘filmgrain’

Description image

Rgrain - Realistic Film Grain Plates for Your Digital FootageOne of the secrets to getting your digital footage a little more cinematic is to add some grain in post. While even footage originating on film sometimes gets this treatment, it’s a nice way to bring back some organic feeling into an otherwise clinical medium. Rgrain, who has been producing realistic grain plates (not actual scanned grain) for some time now, is introducing a brand new pack that extends all the way up to 6K resolution. Check out an introduction video below: More »

Description image

Hollywood films often use tools that regular users can’t easily afford. A good example of that is with a movie that Shane Hurlbut shot, Act of Valor, filmed on the Canon 5D Mark II. The post-production of that film involved a software suite called Dark Energy that is often used with restoring film prints, but in this case they used it to clean up DSLR footage and get rid of compression artifacts and noise, as well as add realistic grain. Well not too long ago, Cinnafilm, the company behind Dark Energy, introduced a Windows plugin for Adobe After Effects. Until Friday, March 15th, the plugin, which is normally $400, is down to just $150. Click through to learn more about it. More »

Description image

Film is going the way of other elegant, exotic, but evolutionarily condemned creatures such as the Tasmanian Tiger, the Dodo bird, and the Macarena. Somehow chart the decline of film use against the rise of digital and you’ll hear a lot about ‘how to make digital look like film’ in your research. It’s almost an existential crisis for shooters of our transitional generation, and the heart of digital’s identity crisis. If film is the look of cinema, what’s the key ingredient? Resolution? Latitude — or worse, light response curve? Motion transfer? Color reproduction? Or should we just let “the digital look” evolve into its own beast altogether? That’s a lot of heavy questions for a Sunday afternoon read, but ones unavoidably raised by a post from Art Adams of Pro Video Coalition about the wide open lensed and low light look of ’80′s and ’90′s films. More »

Description image

Many of you have been using Rgrain with great results after we covered it here. Now they’ve extended their grain packages to even more 16mm and 8mm filters. Film grain filters are fantastic for giving your movie that little bit of dirtiness to compensate for too clean of an image. These new filters also have an advantage over their other filters – they cost a lot less. More »

Description image

Yes, you’re probably thinking, why is yet another company making film grain plates? Especially when there are already others doing it well, including CineGrain, which we’ve covered here before. Well, Rgrain is a little different, as their process does not involve scanning real film frames, but instead is a very close approximation of the real thing. This also gives Rgrain a huge advantage compared to the other guys: cost. Let’s take a look at some samples: More »