» Posts Tagged ‘instagram’

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HyperlapseInstagram played a huge role in making vintage photo filters accessible and ubiquitous. Through the years they’ve added new looks, a social media dimension, and a Vine-like short video application. Yesterday, they took their brand to the next level by launching a standalone app that photographers and videographers alike (as well as everyone else) will appreciate — Hyperlapse, a time-lapse app that has some pretty exciting features: its simple design, sharing capabilities, and especially its image stabilization technology, which is not only absolutely key for time-lapse photography, but was something absent in mobile videography/photography until now. More »

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Like Me

If you’re looking to tell people about your film and get some buzz going, social media is probably your best bet, seeing how Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and so many other platforms have helped filmmakers not only find their film’s audience, but get their films made. Filmmaker Robert Mockler shares how he used social media to do just that for his film Like Me, which is currently in the running for Indiewire’s Project of the Year.

This is a guest post by Robert Mockler. More »

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Emmanuel LubezkiFollowing celebrities on Instagram is nothing new. I’m sure you or someone you know religiously (and/or secretly) checks out Rihanna’s, Kim Kardashian’s, or even the Biebs’ posts, but if you’re like me and you haven’t quite jumped on the “Instagram as social media” train, you may want to make an exception. Six-time Oscar-nominated cinematographer Emmanuel “Chivo” Lubezki, one of the greatest DPs of our time, not only uses his exceptional eye for moving images, but for stills that he posts quietly on Instagram. More »

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Vimeo EchoVideo technology is at an explosive crossroads as the mobile experience perpetuates our media landscape. With apps like Instagram and Vine, creators are constantly redefining how images are experienced. With the acquisition of Echograph, Vimeo changed the iOS app from its $2.99 market price to a free app, suggesting that they are most interested in exploring what draws people to a mobile experience. Hit the jump for more info and a juicy interview with Vimeo CEO Kerry Trainor: More »

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Steve Jobs movieBack in March we talked about how a “flip book effect” became “the world’s first Instagram film experience.” Given the advancements in video recording and sharing, not only by Instagram, but similar platforms, like Vine, my excitement seems cute now — like when I played Star Fox on Super Nintendo for the first time (“How are these graphics possible?”) And as always, new ways are being found to use Instagram, like in the case of Jobsthe Steve Jobs film starring Ashton Kutcher, being the first to use the app to upload a trailer. Are we about to see apps like Instagram and Vine become marketing and advertising platforms? More »

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vineWhen Vine, Twitter’s video-sharing app, was introduced earlier this year, it was expected to be a simple add-on to Twitter, i.e., a way to share short videos as supplements to tweets (“Hey guyz, check me out at the grocery store. :) lol #justinbieber”). The app, which allows for 6 seconds of looping video and no retakes or editing beyond internal jump cuts, took off, and filmmakers like David Lynch and Adam Goldberg made art and comedy out of the app’s inherent limitations. On Monday night, your humble correspondent went to the Upper East Side of Manhattan to meet with Vine master Kyle Williams (aka Keelayjams) and learned some of his secrets. Click below to learn how Kyle makes his Vines, and some tricks to put Vine to use for you as an indie filmmaker. More »

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Video thumbnail for vimeo video 'Video on Instagram' - nofilmschoolThis doesn’t have to be confusing, so let’s briefly recap: various apps and services have quested to achieve the status of being the ‘Instagram of Video.’ Instagram, of course, is known for essentially being the ‘Twitter of Photography.’ Twitter itself has stepped up as a favored contender in this quest with its 6-second-maximum micro-video service Vine. Now, Instagram itself is offering ‘Video on Instagram,’ which allows up to 15 seconds maximum micro-videos. All of which is — well, good — and hopefully fun, but how viable are these apps for the creation of artistic content? More »

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Has Instagram become the new mutoscope? Well — not completely, but the folks at the Toronto Silent Film Festival have come up with an inventive way to replicate this visual illusion in order to draw attention to their upcoming event. By uploading stills from famous silent films on Instagram, users can quickly scroll down the images and watch a scene play out — kind of like a mutoscope or flip book, only digital. Despite a few technical kinks, these stroboscopic “trailers” are bringing silent films to life to a brand new generation of moviegoers. More »

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Twitter is “the internet’s SMS.” Instagram is the Twitter of pictures. Some app somewhere is prophesied to be “the Instagram of Video.” I’ve used epic words for social media’s ‘cinemaminigram’ before, because it’s apparently that big of a deal — or it may just be YouTube. Then again, if Instagram is Twitter for photos, but Facebook nabbed Instagram — all while ‘Instagram for Video’ is still out there — what’s a Twitter to do? The next best thing, or better: Twitter has just dropped Vine for iOS. It’s a lot like Instagram, but for 6 second looping videos. Given that Twitter already is, well, the Instagram of words, this app could be the ‘IoV.’ Is this saga at the beginning of its end? More »

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Though I understand where these things come from, calling something like Lomography “the analog Instagram” is like calling Kodak’s new Super 8 stock “the chemical MiniDV,” or even better, “the new digital from back before digital” — for the sake of modern analog (dear lord I just said that) we’re getting our chicken-and-egg orders mixed up. That said, we’ve seen some pretty interesting blends of the old and the new… and then back to the old again. There was The Impossible Project’s Impossible Instant Lab, which made Polaroids of cell phone stills — which we also called “the Real Instagram,” though again, I understand why. Thanks to (both a hobby and) a company called Lomography, the opposite chicken-egg process is possible — with some help, your smartphone is now also a digital scanner of film negatives. Read: Instant scanning, insta… sharing. More »

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I wasn’t really expecting to have to refer to the theoretical ‘Instagram of Video’ for another while — major choices for mobile users are already in place and ‘in the running’ for such a title, and it could be a while before everyone in the discussion unanimously declares one app the victor (if ever). The Verge (seemingly in a nod to comments) acknowledged YouTube as the elephant in the room for these apps, because even on iOS where the YouTube app is read-only (well, watch-only — no uploads), the service is the megalith for easily-socialized video. A complete YouTube experience is already native on Android (again, YouTube is Google is Android), perhaps to the chagrin of recent Android-joiner Viddy. A new development may totally shift the dynamics of this interplay, however: Google just yesterday released YouTube Capture for iOS. More »

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Where is the supposed ‘Instagram of Video?’ Is it even possible for a motion-based media/social service to be as lightweight, sharable, and just plain easy as Instagram makes stills? The jury is still out, the verdict on which of the contenders will stick — if any at all — is still to be determined. We covered a bit on some of the startups stepping into the ring already, and since then, some other relevant material has surfaced. In one corner, heavyweight Viddy (one of the favorite bets) has just released an Android version of its service for many smartphones, while in the other, small independent startup Lumify wants to make “filmmaking for everyone” and attempts to answer “Why our mobile videos suck.” More »

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Instagram has proven to be a social media force to be reckoned with, and none of the major players already entrenched (or looking to break into) that world are treating it lightly. In fact, several are attempting to reinterpret its model in some fashion or another for a more video-based type of platform. There are already a few startups offering Instagram-type creation and integrated sharing, though it’s unclear what staying power or growth any of them will have in the long run. If one does start growing roots, an ‘Instagram for video’ could become another prime facet of the increasingly cross-pollinated social media ecosystem. But what, if anything, does this all mean for we who deal in pretty moving pictures as our profession? More »