» Posts Tagged ‘learningdslrvideo’

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GH4 Dave DugdaleAnybody who has been learning the ins and outs of shooting video with DSLRs during the past few years is likely very familiar with Dave Dugdale and his excellent educational site Learning DSLR Video. Like the rest of us, Dave started out from square one, with a Canon T2i, a few lenses, and an insatiable hunger to learn anything and everything about the process of DSLR filmmaking. A few years later, Dave is shooting corporate and real-estate videos, and doing it quite well. While his gear has changed a bit since that first DSLR, he has been a Canon shooter since the beginning. Until now, that is. His 45-minute review of the Panasonic GH4 explains why. More »

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Dave Dugdale Swim CommercialBack at NAB 2014, Dave Dugdale, who runs Learning DSLR Video, took some interview footage and b-roll he had shot previously, and sat down with editor Chris Fenwick for a three-hour editing session. The goal was to see what Chris could do with the footage having never seen it before. The video has some great tips for editing interviews down to their most powerful and interesting bits, and if you’ve never used Final Cut Pro X (or you want to know it better), Chris talks about how he uses the program effectively. More »

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Good location audio will make your film shine. The less you have to redo in post the better, as nat sound will bring a level of realism to any project. There are many tools available to help you achieve better sound, from a bevvy of tried and tested field recorders to some crucial on-camera mics like the ever-popular Rode, but what about those hard-to-reach areas away from the camera? Clearly wireless mics are the solution, but which mid-range system is the best? Thanks to Dave Dugdale of Learning DSLR Video, we have our answer. Check out the wireless mic battle of the ages after the jump. More »

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Dave Dugdale over at Learning DSLR Video pits the recently announced Nikon D5100 up against its similarly-priced brethren, the Canon T3i. Dave runs through low light, aliasing, and rolling shutter tests (be sure to watch it in HD). The interesting thing about the D5100 is, despite its visuals holding up pretty well in the comparisons, according to Dave it lacks basic manual movie controls (for those, you have to step up to the D7000), which makes the T3i a better choice for filmmakers. Here’s the shootout: More »